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Andy Musser

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NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former broadcaster Andy Musser, 74, who called Mike Schmidt's division-clinching homer for the Phillies in 1980, died Sunday at his home in Wynnewood, his family said. The cause of death was not given. At one time or another, Mr. Musser did play-by-play for every major sports team in Philadelphia except the Flyers. The native of Lemoyne, Pa., broadcast Phillies games for 26 years. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to Andy's family," Phillies president David Montgomery said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012
ABOUT THIS time of year, Andy Musser and I would catch up with each other for a glass of Anchor Our Special Ale , the San Francisco brewery's Christmas beer. With the recipe for the dark beer famously changing every year - a different spice or grain - he and I would spend an hour or so trying to guess the secret ingredients. Nutmeg, I'd say. Spruce, he'd reply. Andy had retired from the Phillies broadcast booth in 2001 after 26 years as a play-by-play announcer. Years earlier, on an off-day when the Phils were visiting the Giants, he had met Anchor Brewing founder Fritz Maytag.
SPORTS
November 2, 2006 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centerfielder Aaron Rowand likely will be running into walls and sacrificing his body with the Phillies next season, even though he and the club declined their options for 2007 yesterday. All that means is that Rowand is eligible for salary arbitration. Rowand, who remains under the Phillies' control, declined a $3.25 million player option, feeling secure that he is worth more. The Phillies declined their $5 million club option, figuring he is worth less. It's a risk for both sides, but a much smaller one for Rowand.
SPORTS
March 8, 1995 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The Phillies are scheduled to play the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on Sunday, July 30. "The thing that ticks me off," kidded broadcaster Andy Musser, "is that he's probably going to want the day off. " Actually, WGMP (1210-AM) and WPHL (Channel 17) might have to import a whole new crew to work that day. Rich Ashburn, of course, will be inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame that day after yesterday's election by the Veterans Committee. And you just know that his partners - Musser, Harry Kalas and Chris Wheeler - are going to want to be there to share the moment with him and also to watch Mike Schmidt's formal installation among the immortals.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the last several years, Larry Andersen has been comfortable pitching on the mound, teaching prospects in the Phillies' farm system, or even cutting up in the clubhouse. Now, he intends to make himself at home in your living room. When the Phillies begin the 1998 season, Andersen will start his broadcasting career as an analyst on both television and radio, and all he wants you to do is save him a seat at your place. That's the kind of guy Andersen is: personable, approachable, and very much one of you. In that way, he's a lot like the man he's replacing, Richie Ashburn, who died in September.
SPORTS
July 28, 2000 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
None of the 55,352 knew it, but it began so embarrassingly for one Harry Kalas Jr. in Philadelphia on April 10, 1971. It was the day that Bill Giles had dreamed about since the first shovel broke ground at Broad Street and Pattison Avenue in October 1967. The long-awaited $49.5 million jewel of South Philly, Veterans Stadium, was being unwrapped to the approval of a capacity crowd. Everything was perfect except the weather, which was windy and cold, typically Philly for early April.
SPORTS
August 17, 1994 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Chris Wheeler was playing golf when he suddenly stopped. "I asked myself, 'What am I doing here?' " Wheeler said. "It's Sunday morning: I'm not allowed to be here. " Wheeler, one of the primary Phillies announcers idled by the baseball strike now in its sixth day, said that, until now, he hadn't had a summer weekend off since 1981, when the last strike shut down baseball. "It's a weird feeling," he said. "I hate it. " The other members of the Phillies Four - Harry Kalas, Rich Ashburn and Andy Musser - all are, as Ashburn put it, "hanging around to see what happens.
LIVING
October 18, 1993 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's kind of hard to "dis" CBS's World Series broadcast team, what with Sean McDonough being a pro and Tim McCarver being a pro, plus a former Phillie and an area resident to boot. Still, if you had your druthers, wouldn't you prefer to hear the play-by- play action and the insights from the Phillies' regular broadcast team, the guys who have lived and died with this motley crew since Day One in Clearwater? It can be done. You can always turn down the TV and turn up the radio, WOGL-AM (1210)
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Clouds nearly covered Veterans Stadium. The players for both teams filled their dugouts, many leaning over the top step. The fans in the stands, in their seats early, were asked to look up to the Phillies radio booth, just to the third-base side of home plate, where a plaque recently had been hung next to the door. The plaque reads: Rich "Whitey" Ashburn Broadcast Booth. "This game's easy, Harry. " The players and fans saw Harry Kalas, Andy Musser and Chris Wheeler standing where they spent all those days and nights with their friend, Rich Ashburn, gone since Tuesday morning.
SPORTS
March 14, 1986 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
If you're feeling hooped out by Tuesday night and need a pause from the basketball tournaments, Channel 29 is offering a glimpse of spring and summer. The Phillies and Baltimore Orioles will be on TV 29 at 7:30 p.m. from Miami. "I'm excited," Harry Kalas said last night from the Phillies' Clearwater, Fla., spring training base. "It's nice and warm. It feels like baseball. " That's easy for Kalas to say now. But how does the veteran broadcaster feel as he faces what might be the Phillies' second consecutive non-contending season?
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SPORTS
September 6, 2013 | BY BILL FLEISCHMAN, For the Daily News fleiscb@phillynews.com
THE EAGLES' NFL championship victory over Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers in 1960 . . . Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point NBA game in '62 . . . Phillies, plus college football and basketball . . . Bill Campbell called all these events on radio or television. "Bill Campbell is the greatest all-around broadcaster in Philadelphia history," longtime Eagles radio voice Merrill Reese said. Campbell and the late Andy Musser are the only sportscasters who've done play-by-play for the Eagles, Phillies and Sixers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012
ABOUT THIS time of year, Andy Musser and I would catch up with each other for a glass of Anchor Our Special Ale , the San Francisco brewery's Christmas beer. With the recipe for the dark beer famously changing every year - a different spice or grain - he and I would spend an hour or so trying to guess the secret ingredients. Nutmeg, I'd say. Spruce, he'd reply. Andy had retired from the Phillies broadcast booth in 2001 after 26 years as a play-by-play announcer. Years earlier, on an off-day when the Phils were visiting the Giants, he had met Anchor Brewing founder Fritz Maytag.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
ANDY MUSSER'S dulcet tones filled the local airwaves with the pulse and drama of Philly sports for a quarter century. His familiar baritone would rise in enthusiasm when a great play unfolded, such as the day Mike Schmidt smashed a home run against Montreal in 1980 to help the Phillies clinch the Eastern Division title. "He buried that ball!" Andy cried, as excited as any fan within the sound of his voice. Andy brought that kind of energy and enthusiasm to his broadcasts of Phillies games for 26 years, and also did play-by-play for other pro sports - except the Flyers - as well as college games.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former broadcaster Andy Musser, 74, who called Mike Schmidt's division-clinching homer for the Phillies in 1980, died Sunday at his home in Wynnewood, his family said. The cause of death was not given. At one time or another, Mr. Musser did play-by-play for every major sports team in Philadelphia except the Flyers. The native of Lemoyne, Pa., broadcast Phillies games for 26 years. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to Andy's family," Phillies president David Montgomery said in a statement.
SPORTS
November 2, 2006 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centerfielder Aaron Rowand likely will be running into walls and sacrificing his body with the Phillies next season, even though he and the club declined their options for 2007 yesterday. All that means is that Rowand is eligible for salary arbitration. Rowand, who remains under the Phillies' control, declined a $3.25 million player option, feeling secure that he is worth more. The Phillies declined their $5 million club option, figuring he is worth less. It's a risk for both sides, but a much smaller one for Rowand.
SPORTS
September 22, 2001 | By Bill Lyon INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
Big-time, big-head, big-bag-of-wind sports announcer runs into a fan. Big Head: "So, did you catch my last broadcast?" Fan: "I certainly hope so. " It is told by Andy Musser and it is exactly typical of him - self-deprecating, wry and dry, point made gently but unerringly. In a profession of rampant egos, Musser's has always been under a tight rein. He has never thought himself bigger than the booth, or the game, and that has come through the radio and the television set along with his words.
SPORTS
July 28, 2000 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
None of the 55,352 knew it, but it began so embarrassingly for one Harry Kalas Jr. in Philadelphia on April 10, 1971. It was the day that Bill Giles had dreamed about since the first shovel broke ground at Broad Street and Pattison Avenue in October 1967. The long-awaited $49.5 million jewel of South Philly, Veterans Stadium, was being unwrapped to the approval of a capacity crowd. Everything was perfect except the weather, which was windy and cold, typically Philly for early April.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Listening to Larry Andersen on Phillies spring training broadcasts, it's impossible to tell if his knees are knocking. Andersen is in the unenviable position of succeeding the late Rich Ashburn as a Phillies television-radio analyst. Ashburn died last September after 34 years working on Phils broadcasts. Mayor Rendell called Ashburn, a Baseball Hall of Famer, "the most popular Philadelphian of the last 50 years. " Talk about big shoes to fill . . . Andersen, a former major league reliever, minor league pitching coach and renowned clubhouse entertainer, is trying to block out the Ashburn connection.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the last several years, Larry Andersen has been comfortable pitching on the mound, teaching prospects in the Phillies' farm system, or even cutting up in the clubhouse. Now, he intends to make himself at home in your living room. When the Phillies begin the 1998 season, Andersen will start his broadcasting career as an analyst on both television and radio, and all he wants you to do is save him a seat at your place. That's the kind of guy Andersen is: personable, approachable, and very much one of you. In that way, he's a lot like the man he's replacing, Richie Ashburn, who died in September.
SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The moment might come on a balmy spring day at Jack Russell Stadium in Clearwater, with palm trees swaying behind pitchers running in the outfield. It might come on one of those permafrost early April nights at Veterans Stadium or it might come at any road stop the Phillies will make on their annual North American tour. The moment will inevitably happen, though, when Larry Andersen will be called on to make a critical observation over the airwaves about a player he became close to during his last two seasons as a minor league pitching coach in the Phillies' organization.
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