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Andy Seminick

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SPORTS
August 2, 2003 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy Seminick was the Phillies' starting catcher from 1945 to 1951, and he had his best season in 1950, helping the Whiz Kids win the club's first National League pennant since 1915. But Seminick, who will turn 83 on Sept. 12, made perhaps his greatest impact in another area: developing young players. Seminick managed 11 minor-league teams in the Phillies' system from 1959 to 1972, a span interrupted by a coaching stint with the big-league Phils from 1967 to 1969. He then scouted and served as a roving minor-league instructor for the Phils until the mid-1980s.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN A BASEBALL legend like Rogers Hornsby gave a hitter advice, he'd be wise to take it. Stan Lopata, something of a legend himself as a Phillies catcher in the '50s, was having problems at the plate in 1954 when he and outfielder Johnny Wyrostek ran into Hornsby during a road trip. Referring to Lopata, Wyrostek asked Hornsby, "What do you think about this kid?" The Hall of Fame infielder (.358 career batting average, 2,930 hits), said that he had seen Lopata on TV and that he missed the ball too many times.
SPORTS
March 6, 1986 | By BILL CONLIN, Daily News Sports Writer
Andy Seminick is 65 years old now, and you don't have to thumb through "The Baseball Encyclopedia" to discover what position he played for the Phillies. If Norman Rockwell had done a Saturday Evening Post cover featuring a major league catcher, Andy Seminick would have been the one he had in mind. The old Whiz Kid walks through the Phillies' spring training camp here on legs so bowed, he could stand at attention and Ozzie Virgil could fly one of his radio-controlled planes between them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, winning is the main thing in baseball. But reminiscing is a close second. Give a diehard fan half a chance and he will take you to a season past, recalling clutch plays and colorful characters in come-to-life detail. Take William Kashatus. Growing up in Northeast Philadelphia, idolizing Mike Schmidt, he came to love the game. And when he talks about the glory years of baseball in Philadelphia, he is like a runner hurtling toward home plate: unstoppable. "So many of my fondest memories have to do with baseball," said Kashatus, a baseball historian and author.
NEWS
July 20, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Del Wilber, 83, who during a long baseball career made a brief but memorable stop in Philadelphia, died Thursday of bone cancer at The Fountains, a nursing home in St. Petersburg, Fla. Mr. Wilber, a native of Lincoln Park, Mich., had been a resident of Kirkwood, Mo., a St. Louis suburb, before moving to Florida about a year ago. Mr. Wilber spent decades in the major leagues, as a player, coach and scout with several organizations. He broke in as a player with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946, a strapping, 6-foot-3, 200-pound catcher.
SPORTS
July 1, 1986 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Joe Reilly was not the first scout to provide Steve Pindyski a sliver of hope concerning his chances of playing professional baseball. Like everyone else, Reilly started his pep talk with a word that amateurs on the pro-prospect fringe have come to despise. It's amazing how much frustration a little, two-letter word such as "if" can create. "If we needed an outfielder, because someone got hurt or released, we'd love to sign someone like you," Reilly told Pindyski yesterday, during the latter portion of the Phillies' seventh annual Lincoln High tryout camp.
SPORTS
July 3, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Ray Schulte has a pleasant surprise for Carl Goldberg. Goldberg, 60, operates a window covering company in Northeast Philadelphia, lives in Yardley and, by his own admission, is absolutely wacko about baseball. Goldberg has owned a full-season ticket plan to Phillies games since the early 1980s, when his son, Michael, was a batboy. And he has turned his basement into a miniature Phillies Hall of Fame, with such items as a turnstile and seats from Connie Mack Stadium, catcher Andy Seminick's uniform from the 1950 World Series and a program from the 1915 World Series.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eddie Sawyer, 87, who managed the 1950 Phillies "Whiz Kids" to an improbable National League championship, died yesterday morning at Phoenixville Hospital after a brief illness. He lived in Valley Forge. Two weeks earlier, Richie Ashburn, a longtime Phillies announcer who was Mr. Sawyer's star centerfielder, died of a heart attack in New York. "Rich's death was a big shock," Andy Seminick, the Whiz Kids catcher, said yesterday from Melbourne, Fla. "Eddie was up in age, but it's still a shock to hear that he's gone.
SPORTS
October 23, 2000 | by Bob Vetrone Jr., Daily News Sports Writer
There will be more than enough baseball fun to go around in New York for a while, but we wanted to have some ourselves, so. . . Welcome to the Daily News version of baseball's Subway Series, pitting Philadelphia A's and Phillies players of all eras against each other. And there's no telling who will show up to play, manage, broadcast or attend these imaginative, never-in-a-lifetime events. Some of the action might jog your memory, some might jar your funnybone. Either way, at least for the next week Philadelphia will be the second-best baseball town in America.
SPORTS
February 22, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first day of another spring training, and Bill Giles stood on the roof at Carpenter Complex yesterday, surveying the state of his empire. The good news was that, from where the Phillies' president stood, he could look down upon men who were among the greatest pitchers and catchers in the history of the franchise. The bad news was that they were people named Robin Roberts and Andy Seminick, and it appeared that they were a little bit past their prime. In fact, they were serving only as special instructors for the Phillies.
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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN A BASEBALL legend like Rogers Hornsby gave a hitter advice, he'd be wise to take it. Stan Lopata, something of a legend himself as a Phillies catcher in the '50s, was having problems at the plate in 1954 when he and outfielder Johnny Wyrostek ran into Hornsby during a road trip. Referring to Lopata, Wyrostek asked Hornsby, "What do you think about this kid?" The Hall of Fame infielder (.358 career batting average, 2,930 hits), said that he had seen Lopata on TV and that he missed the ball too many times.
SPORTS
October 28, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Go back and explore baseball in that first week of October 1950, the last time the Phillies and Yankees met in a World Series, and if you confine yourself to what's taking place on the field and not what the players are wearing, earning or saying, you'll find a game that has changed very little. The distances between bases and from the mound to home plate are the same. Infielders still turn double plays, pitchers still outfox hitters with curves and sliders, and managers still like the sacrifice bunt.
SPORTS
February 23, 2004 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy Seminick, the former Phillies catcher who later served as a minor-league manager and major-league coach for the organization, died yesterday of cancer in a Florida hospital. He was 83. Mr. Seminick, 83, had been the last living everyday player from the 1950 Whiz Kids, the youthful Phillies team that stunned the baseball world by winning the National League championship. "If you had to pick a guy in the clubhouse who was our leader that year, it would be Andy," Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts said last night from his home outside Tampa, Fla. "He always played hard, and that was his best year by far. " Mr. Seminick was the Phillies' starting catcher from 1945 to 1951, and he hit .288 with 24 home runs and 68 RBIs in 1950, helping the Phils win their first pennant since 1915.
SPORTS
August 2, 2003 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy Seminick was the Phillies' starting catcher from 1945 to 1951, and he had his best season in 1950, helping the Whiz Kids win the club's first National League pennant since 1915. But Seminick, who will turn 83 on Sept. 12, made perhaps his greatest impact in another area: developing young players. Seminick managed 11 minor-league teams in the Phillies' system from 1959 to 1972, a span interrupted by a coaching stint with the big-league Phils from 1967 to 1969. He then scouted and served as a roving minor-league instructor for the Phils until the mid-1980s.
NEWS
July 20, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Del Wilber, 83, who during a long baseball career made a brief but memorable stop in Philadelphia, died Thursday of bone cancer at The Fountains, a nursing home in St. Petersburg, Fla. Mr. Wilber, a native of Lincoln Park, Mich., had been a resident of Kirkwood, Mo., a St. Louis suburb, before moving to Florida about a year ago. Mr. Wilber spent decades in the major leagues, as a player, coach and scout with several organizations. He broke in as a player with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946, a strapping, 6-foot-3, 200-pound catcher.
SPORTS
May 25, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly before 6 p.m. on May 25, 1951, something was disturbing the familiar pregame rhythms at Shibe Park. Long before that night's Phillies-New York Giants game, the grandstands were unusually noisy and crowded. Sprinkled throughout the old ballpark at 21st and Lehigh were hundreds of black Philadelphians, a demographic that typically showed up in large numbers only when Jackie Robinson's Brooklyn Dodgers visited. And on the field, a palpable sense of anticipation had replaced the relaxed inattention of batting practice while players on both teams watched a young Giants outfielder walk into the batting cage.
SPORTS
October 23, 2000 | by Bob Vetrone Jr., Daily News Sports Writer
There will be more than enough baseball fun to go around in New York for a while, but we wanted to have some ourselves, so. . . Welcome to the Daily News version of baseball's Subway Series, pitting Philadelphia A's and Phillies players of all eras against each other. And there's no telling who will show up to play, manage, broadcast or attend these imaginative, never-in-a-lifetime events. Some of the action might jog your memory, some might jar your funnybone. Either way, at least for the next week Philadelphia will be the second-best baseball town in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, winning is the main thing in baseball. But reminiscing is a close second. Give a diehard fan half a chance and he will take you to a season past, recalling clutch plays and colorful characters in come-to-life detail. Take William Kashatus. Growing up in Northeast Philadelphia, idolizing Mike Schmidt, he came to love the game. And when he talks about the glory years of baseball in Philadelphia, he is like a runner hurtling toward home plate: unstoppable. "So many of my fondest memories have to do with baseball," said Kashatus, a baseball historian and author.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eddie Sawyer, 87, who managed the 1950 Phillies "Whiz Kids" to an improbable National League championship, died yesterday morning at Phoenixville Hospital after a brief illness. He lived in Valley Forge. Two weeks earlier, Richie Ashburn, a longtime Phillies announcer who was Mr. Sawyer's star centerfielder, died of a heart attack in New York. "Rich's death was a big shock," Andy Seminick, the Whiz Kids catcher, said yesterday from Melbourne, Fla. "Eddie was up in age, but it's still a shock to hear that he's gone.
SPORTS
July 3, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Ray Schulte has a pleasant surprise for Carl Goldberg. Goldberg, 60, operates a window covering company in Northeast Philadelphia, lives in Yardley and, by his own admission, is absolutely wacko about baseball. Goldberg has owned a full-season ticket plan to Phillies games since the early 1980s, when his son, Michael, was a batboy. And he has turned his basement into a miniature Phillies Hall of Fame, with such items as a turnstile and seats from Connie Mack Stadium, catcher Andy Seminick's uniform from the 1950 World Series and a program from the 1915 World Series.
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