CollectionsAndy Warhol
IN THE NEWS

Andy Warhol

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1991 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
This week's list of new videos is led by a look at a legend of the contemporary art world. SUPERSTAR: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ANDY WARHOL (1990) (Vestron) $89.98. 85 minutes. Sally Kirkland, Dennis Hopper, Liza Minnelli, Grace Jones. While there will never be a consensus about whether Andy Warhol was shaman or sham, director Chuck Workman's fascinating documentary film suggests that Warhol's enduring talent was not as an art maker but as a behavioral barometer and faddist. The man who, in life, predicted that everyone would be famous for 15 minutes enjoys, in death, a kind of eternal infamy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With his metallic blond wig and snug leather jacket, his Brillo boxes and Elvis silk screens, his coterie of drag queens and movie-star manques, Andy Warhol was a '60s godhead. He reigned over the New York underground scene, exuding transcendental ennui and playing a kind of Wizard of Odd to poets and poseurs, rockers and models, filmmakers and photographers, all sprawled across his Union Square studio. Among the fringe players who insinuated themselves into the Factory, Valerie Solanas holds particular distinction: On June 3, 1968, the psych major-turned-radical feminist took out a Beretta and perforated the pop artist's chest.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Campbell Soup is tapping Andy Warhol for another 15 minutes of fame. The Camden soup maker plans to introduce special-edition cans of its condensed tomato soup bearing labels reminiscent of the pop artist's paintings at Target stores starting Sunday. The 1.2 million cans will cost 75 cents each. The Campbell Soup Co.'s embrace of Warhol's iconic imagery is a switch from its initial reaction, when the company considered taking legal action but held off to see how the paintings were received by the public.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 2, John Miles began the evening swathed in blue plastic, belting out Velvet Underground lyrics, and quoting Andy Warhol ("Oh wow! Oh gee!") at a pop-up performance with the Bearded Ladies Cabaret at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At intermission, he left - and sped toward the Academy of Music in Friday evening traffic, to lend his baritone to the chorus in Opera Philadelphia's production of Mozart's Don Giovanni . That's the type of creative conflict that was bound to arise when Opera Philadelphia partnered with the scrappy 4-year-old collaborative-theater Bearded Ladies Cabaret.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | New York Daily News
Andy Warhol, 58, the pop culture prince who turned images of Campbell's Soup cans and Brillo pads into art, died yesterday of a heart attack. The artist's death came a day after he underwent gall bladder surgery. A spokesman for New York Hospital said an autopsy would be done to determine the exact cause of death. Warhol was an iconoclast and an eccentric, rejecting accepted conventions of art, society and behavior. "In the future," he wrote in a 1968 exhibition catalog, "everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1989 | By Linda Herskowitz, Special to The Inquirer
History will judge whether Andy Warhol was an artistic genius or merely a genius merchandiser. Before there was Andy Warhol, pop artist and cultural icon who hit gold with silk-screen Campbell soup cans and Marilyn Monroes, there was Andy Warhol, inspired journeyman commercial artist working hard and successfully in New York. That period of his life during the '50s largely has escaped notice in the national Warholmania that has prevailed since his death in early 1987 at age 58. Now, an exhibit touring the country casts new light on his life and work before pop. "Success Is a Job in New York . . . The Early Art and Business of Andy Warhol" attempts to explain more fully the roots of Warhol's art. Organized by Donna De Salvo and the staff of the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, the exhibit shows about 200 works made between 1949 and 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1989 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Elvis, make room. With all the yakety-yak still swirling about his persona, you get the feeling it's Andy Warhol who still might be in the land of the living. Indeed, he has made his 15 minutes of fame last beyond a lifetime. The University of Pennsylvania's Institute of Contemporary Art, 34th and Walnut streets, is getting into the thick of things with a major new exhibition, " 'Success is a Job in New York . . .': The Early Art and Business of Andy Warhol," which opens today.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Will any composer ever do for music what Andy Warhol did for art - that is, legitimize commercial or pop or other nonclassical material by importing it into a high-art context? Actually, classical composers engaged in cross-cultural travel long before Warhol rescued a soup-can label from its merely quotidian existence, giving new context to country dances (Beethoven), jazz (Gershwin) and eavesdropped sounds of life (Cage). And the five composers who premiered their Warhol-inspired works Wednesday night at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts dabbled a bit with the idea of new context, but they wisely avoided the obvious.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one expected it. Sure, Andy was famous. He'd been in Time and Life and all the newspapers. Pop was in high season. But Andy was an artist, and fame for artists is sedate, a cultured affair - critics atwitter, panel discussions and all that. So Andy arrived for his big show at Philadelphia's Institute of Contemporary Art, his first museum retrospective - how heavy can you get? - and, like locusts, they were all over him. The crush was amazing - thousands (yes, thousands) of people pushing and grabbing, throwing elbows, stomping, clamoring, "There he is!"
NEWS
March 4, 1987
After reading George Will's Feb. 26 column on the late Andy Warhol, I'm left wondering "what did we do to deserve" the cheap, condescending, if-I- don't-like-it-it-can't-possibly-be-any-good attitude of a George F. Will. Garrett K. Helmuth Glen Mills.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Opera Philadelphia's 2015-16 season is converging from more distant points than usual - or, possibly, ever. La Traviata (October) is imported from Bucharest. And though Andy: A Popera (September) hails from nearby neighborhoods, it's a product of the artistically distant FringeArts. The new Jennifer Higdon/Gene Scheer opera Cold Mountain will arrive in February from Santa Fe. With an epic Civil War-era production at the Academy of Music and such stars as Nathan Gunn and Isabel Leonard, it occupies the largest part of the season budget (approximately $2.4 million)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The composer usually is first to come aboard, even in the most unconventional operas. However, the appointment of Opera Philadelphia's now-in-process ANDY: A Popera composer Dan Visconti was only announced this week - for a piece that has already had public workshop performances by the Philadelphia cabaret group the Bearded Ladies. "It's great to taste ways of working that are foreign to classical composers," said the 32-year-old Chicagoan. Director John Jarboe called the collaboration "radical . . . in form and process.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 2, John Miles began the evening swathed in blue plastic, belting out Velvet Underground lyrics, and quoting Andy Warhol ("Oh wow! Oh gee!") at a pop-up performance with the Bearded Ladies Cabaret at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At intermission, he left - and sped toward the Academy of Music in Friday evening traffic, to lend his baritone to the chorus in Opera Philadelphia's production of Mozart's Don Giovanni . That's the type of creative conflict that was bound to arise when Opera Philadelphia partnered with the scrappy 4-year-old collaborative-theater Bearded Ladies Cabaret.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Having recently announced a new opera on the unlikely subject of Charlie Parker, Opera Philadelphia goes a step further with a new work about a cultural icon who was a remote, chilly presence, and famously predicted that everyone would have 15 minutes of fame: Andy Warhol. Andy: A Popera was announced Friday in anticipation of a 2015 premiere, in a collaboration between Opera Philadelphia and the cabaret group the Bearded Ladies. It's not a joke. "Do we make people famous, or does their work make them famous?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
J-Law kills early and often The New York Film Critics Circle Awards, among the earliest of the big filmic prize season, came out Tuesday. Jennifer Lawrence , natch, won for best supporting actress in American Hustle , her flick with Bradley Cooper . Shape of things to come? And guess what - Hustle won best picture! Other winners: Cate Blanchett for best actress in Woody Allen 's Blue Jasmine ; Robert Redford for best actor in All Is Lost ; Jared Leto for best supporting actor in Dallas Buyers Club ; Fruitvale Station as best first film; and the controversial Blue Is the Warmest Colo r for best foreign film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Decadence is glamorous. This holds true in depictions of the decline of the Roman Empire, the gin-fueled Roaring Twenties, and in Quintessence Theatre Group's slick, sumptuous production of The Misanthrope. In his 17th-century original, Molière indicted Parisian aristocracy and the hypocritical customs of polite society. British dramatist Martin Crimp's 2009 adaptation takes aim at the overlaps among film, stage, and journalism in 21st-century London. Here, playwright Alceste (John Williams)
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Campbell Soup is tapping Andy Warhol for another 15 minutes of fame. The Camden soup maker plans to introduce special-edition cans of its condensed tomato soup bearing labels reminiscent of the pop artist's paintings at Target stores starting Sunday. The 1.2 million cans will cost 75 cents each. The Campbell Soup Co.'s embrace of Warhol's iconic imagery is a switch from its initial reaction, when the company considered taking legal action but held off to see how the paintings were received by the public.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
1. b. Muddy Waters. 2. c. Ron Wood. 3. a. "Come On. " 4. d. Aftermath. 5. b. Their Satanic Majesties Request. 6. c. Brian Jones. 7. a. Gimme Shelter. 8. d. Andy Warhol. 9. b. She's the Boss. 10. d. Keith Richards.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Andy Warhol died on George Washington's birthday 25 years ago from complications of gallbladder surgery. Having survived a near-fatal shooting 19 years before that, he had by then become a legendary figure in the international art world, as famous as Picasso, if not more so. It's not surprising, then, that his reputation not only hasn't diminished, as most posthumous reputations do, but actually has appreciated, along with the value of his art. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012
Andy Warhol, who described his eclectic group of friends as "superstars," is getting the star treatment himself on the 25th anniversary of his death. Da Vinci Art Alliance is mounting a multimedia exhibition called "Warholized: The Silver Show. " The juried show features work by 36 artists, including prints, paintings and sculptures, all of which are inspired by Warhol's art and life. The exhibit's opening reception includes an awards presentation by James and Madalen Warhola, the pop artist's nephew and niece, who judged the work.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|