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Anesthesia

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NEWS
February 18, 1986 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast Philadelphia woman died Sunday after undergoing anesthesia in preparation for dental surgery last month, authorities said yesterday. The woman, Anita J. Pezzullo, 21, of the 7900 block of Frankford Avenue, died Sunday morning at Germantown Hospital and Medical Center, where she had been in a coma for more than two weeks, according to the medical examiner's office. An autopsy performed by Dr. Halbert E. Fillinger determined that Pezzullo died from lack of oxygen to the brain, with the official cause of death listed as a "therapeutic misadventure," an official of the medical examiner's office said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
If you think the title - O Yes I Will (I will remember the spirit and texture of this conversation) - is affected and wordy, wait until you see the play. This one-woman show (Michelle Horman with a little help from Joseph Ritsch) by Deb Margolin, presented by Gas & Electric Arts at the Adrienne, is about a woman's 12 minutes under anesthesia when she talked nonstop to the doctors in the operating room. How come the show doesn't take 12 minutes, you ask? Well, this is the "spirit and texture," not the conversation itself.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to colonoscopies, most patients agree comfort during the procedure is key. But how much comfort? And at what cost? With more patients receiving anesthesia during colonoscopies - rather than light or moderate conscious sedation - the expense of using the drug propofol by a credentialed anesthetist or anesthesiologist has come into question. In the spring, Highmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the dominant insurer in western Pennsylvania, announced it would no longer pay benefits for monitored anesthesia for average-risk patients receiving endoscopic procedures.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
Lily Teresa Gallagher, 67, of Plymouth Meeting, a certified registered nurse-anesthetist, died Dec. 29 of multiple-system atrophy at her home. Lily Mascarenhas was born in Goa, India, and worked as a midwife for the Medical Mission Sisters in Patna, India. She came to the United States to study nursing at Cook County Hospital in Chicago in 1972, and earned her nurse anesthesia degree at Nazareth Hospital in Philadelphia in 1976. She also received a bachelor of science degree in biology from St. Joseph's University in 1986 while working full-time and teaching nurse anesthesia to students at Lankenau Hospital.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
On a midsummer Tuesday morning at the Roberts Proton Therapy Center at Penn Medicine, the children's waiting room is bustling. Preteens punch up basketball video games while younger children squash Play-Doh through a plastic mold or check doll heart rates with toy stethoscopes. At a round table in the center of the waiting room sits Carlin Beasley, a delicate 3-year-old in a pink tutu whose mischievous eyes gaze out above a wide sterile mask. Chemotherapy for a brain tumor has compromised her immune system, but it hasn't stopped Carlin from pulling out the pieces of a real-life prep kit designed to deliver anesthesia.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery Hospital of Norristown and three physicians have agreed to pay the federal government $1.2 million to settle allegations they submitted false bills to Medicare for anesthesia services. The bills submitted by the doctors were for services they did not personally administer, between July 1989 and December 1992. The settlement, announced by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, constitutes triple damages for the false submissions. The settlement is to be paid by March 15. In December, the University of Pennsylvania Medical System agreed to pay the federal government $30 million for similar false billings in one of the largest settlements of its kind.
LIVING
November 25, 1996 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In another sign of tighter times in health care, some of Pennsylvania's most highly trained nurses and doctors are battling over proposed regulations that would give doctors greater control over nurse anesthetists. Doctors argue that the new rules would make surgery safer. They cite a major study from the 1970s, which showed that there were fewer deaths when doctors did the anesthesia. Nurses counter that the regulations are aimed at ensuring jobs for highly paid anesthesiologists while costing patients more money.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Monica Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Jonathan Victor Roth has been promoted to chairman of the department of anesthesiology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. Roth has been acting chairman of the department since 1988. Roth joined Einstein in 1985 as a staff anesthesiologist and has added to that appointment chairman of the resident education committee, acting director of cardiothoracic anesthesia, acting co-director of the heart surgical unit and acting director of anesthesia research. He was a clinical assistant professor of anesthesia at Temple University School of Medicine from 1985 to 1989 and is an assistant profesor of anesthesia at Temple.
NEWS
January 2, 1987
I was emotionally torn as I read The Inquirer on Dec. 18. Granted, there aren't many days when my specialty receives two front-page references. Quite apart from my feelings about the contents of the two articles, I must protest at anesthesia being referred to in the same breath as infection and psychological trauma as a complication of abortion. In the broadest sense, anesthesiology as a medical specialty is concerned with the relief of pain, including the pain associated with surgical procedures.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kellie Woll administered a few squirts of clear liquid to a dish full of wriggling tadpoles and within minutes, the creatures became completely still. A few minutes after that, they started to move again. No surprise, as the liquid contained propofol, a widely used anesthetic. With it and most other anesthetics, however, there is not much difference between the amount needed to put someone to sleep and the amount that will knock one out permanently. Woll works in the University of Pennsylvania lab of Roderic G. Eckenhoff, who is on a long-term quest for better alternatives.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to colonoscopies, most patients agree comfort during the procedure is key. But how much comfort? And at what cost? With more patients receiving anesthesia during colonoscopies - rather than light or moderate conscious sedation - the expense of using the drug propofol by a credentialed anesthetist or anesthesiologist has come into question. In the spring, Highmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the dominant insurer in western Pennsylvania, announced it would no longer pay benefits for monitored anesthesia for average-risk patients receiving endoscopic procedures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer
UNLIKE well-known Philadelphia landmarks that bear such famous names as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, the Mutter Museum's namesake is a relatively mysterious fellow. Dr. Thomas Dent Mutter did not start or finish his life in Philadelphia, but during his 15-year tenure in the mid-1800s as professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College, he was among the country's finest physicians - the city's first surgeon to use ethyl ether anesthesia and an early pioneer in plastic surgery.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
On a midsummer Tuesday morning at the Roberts Proton Therapy Center at Penn Medicine, the children's waiting room is bustling. Preteens punch up basketball video games while younger children squash Play-Doh through a plastic mold or check doll heart rates with toy stethoscopes. At a round table in the center of the waiting room sits Carlin Beasley, a delicate 3-year-old in a pink tutu whose mischievous eyes gaze out above a wide sterile mask. Chemotherapy for a brain tumor has compromised her immune system, but it hasn't stopped Carlin from pulling out the pieces of a real-life prep kit designed to deliver anesthesia.
NEWS
September 8, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ashley Grim suffers from a variety of medical problems, among them scoliosis, difficulty swallowing, and unstable blood pressure, so she has had to endure being poked and prodded more times than most children. Yet Ashley also has a harder time coping with medical settings than most children, as she has been diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum. When she went to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for a procedure last year, the experience of being placed under anesthesia was too much.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Michael Carroll
When I was a kid in the 1950s and 1960s, I remember my father talking about family and friends who "never got up off the table" after surgery. It was a time of modern medicine, more or less, and things were advancing and improving dramatically every year. But Dad's view of medicine was formed earlier in the 20th century. He was born in 1912, before antibiotics, before sophisticated heart and lung devices, and in an age of more primitive anesthesia. He lived in the Pennsylvania coal region, hours from city medical centers.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. said Friday that a drug designed to help patients coming out of anesthesia after surgery will require three more months of review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Sugammadex sodium is an injectable drug that reverses the muscle-relaxing effects of anesthesia. If approved, the drug would be the first in a new class of medicine in this country. Merck is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., but has a big operation in West Point, Montgomery County. The European Medicines Agency approved the drug in 2008 and it is sold in Europe under the name Bridion.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
Lily Teresa Gallagher, 67, of Plymouth Meeting, a certified registered nurse-anesthetist, died Dec. 29 of multiple-system atrophy at her home. Lily Mascarenhas was born in Goa, India, and worked as a midwife for the Medical Mission Sisters in Patna, India. She came to the United States to study nursing at Cook County Hospital in Chicago in 1972, and earned her nurse anesthesia degree at Nazareth Hospital in Philadelphia in 1976. She also received a bachelor of science degree in biology from St. Joseph's University in 1986 while working full-time and teaching nurse anesthesia to students at Lankenau Hospital.
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