CollectionsAng Lee
IN THE NEWS

Ang Lee

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There was a whole lot of fringe at Woodstock, the pivotal fringe festival that took place 40 years ago not in the artsy Upstate New York town but in the distant hamlet of Bethel. In the summer of '69 there were 500,000 stories in that naked village. Taking Woodstock is one of them, a microcosm of the fabled occasion that brought rock-and-roll to Rip Van Winkle country. Ang Lee's deadpan-comic account of the event sees the shaggy and fringe-vested horde through the bemused eyes of Elliot Teichberg (Demetri Martin)
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | by Yardena Arar, Los Angeles Daily News
"Eat Drink Man Woman," director Ang Lee's celebration of family life and good food in contemporary Taiwan, received six nominations Tuesday to pace the field for the 1995 Spirit Awards honoring independent films. Alan Rudolph's "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle" and Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" followed with five nominations apiece from the Independent Feature Project/West's 11-member Spirit Awards nominating committee, which chose from among 112 films submitted by the independent filmmaking community.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | This report includes material from the Associated Press, Reuters, and Inquirer staff writer Denise Cowie
Oscar may not speak English this year. Taiwanese-born director Ang Lee has received the Directors Guild award for "outstanding directorial achievement in feature film" for his Chinese-language kung fu epic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Lee, who has been nominated for an Oscar for best director, received the guild award Saturday night. The award is one of the most prestigious stops on the road to the Academy Awards, which will be presented March 25. Since it was first given in 1949, only four of its recipients have failed to win Oscars for best director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1973, the end of the Vietnam War and the third-rate burglary of a hotel known as Watergate had set off another powerful quake in an America still experiencing the political and cultural aftershocks of the '60s. But half a world away, 18-year-old Ang Lee had his own problems. To the consternation of his conservative father, the rebellious Taiwanese high school student, who could speak no English, had flunked his college entrance exams and was leaving home. It was time to begin the long odyssey that, a quarter-century later, would bring him back to 1973 and The Ice Storm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011 | By MIN LEE, Associated Press
HONG KONG - Oscar-winning director Ang Lee played an important role in "The Hangover Part II" - at least offscreen. He is the father of one of the actors. The filmmaker's younger son, Mason Lee, plays Teddy, the teenager the lead characters try to rescue as they struggle to piece together what happened during a crazy night in Bangkok. Ang Lee was clearly a proud dad speaking to reporters after catching a showing with his younger brother and mother earlier this week in Taiwan, his home country.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | By Steven Rea Inquirer movie critic Carrie Rickey contributed to this article
During the sumptuous four-minute opening-credits sequence of Eat Drink Man Woman, viewers get to see a deft display of culinary wizardry: the brisk chopping of exotic vegetables, the surgical preparation of sea bass, the bubbling pot of lotus flower soup. To shoot these scenes, Ang Lee, who co- wrote and directed this follow-up to his Oscar-nominated art-house hit The Wedding Banquet, employed a trio of top Taiwanese cooks. More than 100 recipes were used in the film, which traces the relationship between three grown daughters and their widower father - a father who happens to be Taipei's most celebrated chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Say what you will about the sex scenes in the NC-17 "Lust, Caution" - they're anything but gratuitous. Ang Lee's World War II espionage movie is about a Chinese resistance fighter (Tang Wei) who, during the Japanese occupation of Shanghai, seduces a high-ranking collaborator (Tony Leung Chiu-Wai) in order to set him up for assassination. Just about everything that's important about their psychologically tortured relationship plays out while sexual congress is in session - sessions that involve bondage, submission and what appears to border on rape.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An act of courage, like an act of love, requires a leap of faith. It is with gravity and levity and incomparable grace that Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon - by light years the best movie of 2000 - makes those leaps literally, with heroes and villains springing onto rooftops and treetops variously in pursuit of amour, adventure, revenge, righteousness, and a mystical broadsword called the Green Destiny. Set in a China of the indefinite past, Crouching Tiger melds the legend of Mulan with the tales of King Arthur and Robin Hood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012
THERE ARE three principles for headache-free moviemaking, and they haven't changed since the silent era. Don't work with kids. Don't work with animals. Don't shoot on water. All three can make practical shooting difficult. Ang Lee does all three in "Life of Pi," the story of a boy crossing the sea with a tiger, and he does it in 3-D. Which raises a question: is he nuts? "Oh yeah, I had some friends, some very good friends, say I don't know what you're thinking, but drop it while you still can," said Lee, the Taiwanese director who's added the Oscar-hyped "Pi" to his impressive and diverse roster of credits - "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "Brokeback Mountain," and "Sense and Sensibility.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Ross Katz, a Havertown-raised Temple alum, directed two movies before taking on the newest Nicholas Sparks adaptation, The Choice . The first was the HBO movie drama Taking Chance , about a Marine (played by fellow Philadelphian Kevin Bacon) escorting the body of a fallen soldier home. The second, last year's Adult Beginners , was a sort of coming-of-middle-age family dramedy starring Nick Kroll as a man whose life falls apart, getting it back together only when he returns home.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar noms due The great day is almost upon us - Oscar night! The Feb. 28 event will be kicked off Thursday with the announcement of this year's nominations. Guillermo del Toro , John Krasinski, and Ang Lee will rattle off noms in all 24 categories at a live two-hour news conference on ABC beginning at 8:30 a.m. (It'll also be streamed live at www.oscars.org/live .) Murdoch to wed again Keith Rupert Murdoch , 83, has decided to take a fourth wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
A LINE OF action figures based on the characters from "Django Unchained" have recently gone on sale ($34.99 retail), but Najee Ali wants them taken off the market. Ali, director of the advocacy group Project Islamic Hope, in conjunction with other Los Angeles black community leaders, called for the removal of the toys and said they're "a slap in the face of our ancestors" that "trivializes the horrors of slavery. " But do they really? More than the film itself? Did the action figures made for Quentin Tarantino 's last film, "Inglourious Basterds," trivialize the horrors of the Nazis?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. Talk about crouching tigers! Ang Lee, director of a certain martial-arts adventure, pounces on Life of Pi , the mystical tale based on Yann Martel's novel of a wiry Bengal tiger and a wary adolescent adrift in a lifeboat. The tiger is Richard Parker, so called due to a clerical error that scrambled the name of the cat and his captor. The youth is Piscine Patel, also called Pi, an Indian boy named after the French word for pool . The lifeboat is big enough for eight humans but not for its unexpected cargo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012
THERE ARE three principles for headache-free moviemaking, and they haven't changed since the silent era. Don't work with kids. Don't work with animals. Don't shoot on water. All three can make practical shooting difficult. Ang Lee does all three in "Life of Pi," the story of a boy crossing the sea with a tiger, and he does it in 3-D. Which raises a question: is he nuts? "Oh yeah, I had some friends, some very good friends, say I don't know what you're thinking, but drop it while you still can," said Lee, the Taiwanese director who's added the Oscar-hyped "Pi" to his impressive and diverse roster of credits - "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "Brokeback Mountain," and "Sense and Sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
CALL HIM Ishmael. Or Jonah. Or Noah. But his name in this sea story is Pi. An Indian boy (Suraj Sharma) months adrift on the trackless ocean, trying to survive on a small lifeboat that he must share with a tiger - his only companion, his mortal enemy, the thing that gives him purpose, the thing that's waiting to take his life. Here we have the capital "P" makings of a parable, or in this case, a parable about parables. The entire story (drawn from the Yann Martel novel) is posed as a challenge, described by its narrator as a story that will make an atheist believe in God. A tall order, surely.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life of Pi , Yann Martel's best-selling novel about a 16-year-old boy who survives for 227 days in a lifeboat in the Pacific, will make the most cynical skeptic believe in God, boasts one of its more colorful characters. It's a doozy of a claim, and it gave some pause to filmmaker Ang Lee, whose dazzling, breathtaking $100 million 3-D film version opens on Wednesday. "I'm not sure it will make you believe in God," the Taiwanese-born American director said in a phone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011 | By MIN LEE, Associated Press
HONG KONG - Oscar-winning director Ang Lee played an important role in "The Hangover Part II" - at least offscreen. He is the father of one of the actors. The filmmaker's younger son, Mason Lee, plays Teddy, the teenager the lead characters try to rescue as they struggle to piece together what happened during a crazy night in Bangkok. Ang Lee was clearly a proud dad speaking to reporters after catching a showing with his younger brother and mother earlier this week in Taiwan, his home country.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Although it circles back on itself, bracketed by dreamy scenes of snow-covered woods where momentous things occur, Alejandro González Iñárritu's Biutiful works differently than the Mexican director's previous films. No overlapping time-loop narratives, no sprawling, interconnected cast of characters. The story is linear, the point of view belongs to just one man. And yet, this immensely powerful and haunting work resonates in ways that Amores Perros , 21 Grams, and Babel - hardly lightweight affairs - did not. Much of that resonance has to do with Javier Bardem, who was rightly accorded a best-actor Oscar nomination last week and who draws from a deep, deep well of love, pain, and who-knows-what-else.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There was a whole lot of fringe at Woodstock, the pivotal fringe festival that took place 40 years ago not in the artsy Upstate New York town but in the distant hamlet of Bethel. In the summer of '69 there were 500,000 stories in that naked village. Taking Woodstock is one of them, a microcosm of the fabled occasion that brought rock-and-roll to Rip Van Winkle country. Ang Lee's deadpan-comic account of the event sees the shaggy and fringe-vested horde through the bemused eyes of Elliot Teichberg (Demetri Martin)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|