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BUSINESS
December 29, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Want a free workout to treat your holiday hangover? WeTrain, a Philly start-up, is offering one free workout session - if you send the company a message using social media. And you have to mention that the company just won Philly's version of the hit television show Shark Tank . A 30-minute session regularly costs $17 or $25, if you split it with another person. Philly's version of the television show is called Veteran Shark Tank. And the winners were Zachary Hertzel and Jon Sockol, co-founders of the start-up WeTrain, at the Dec. 7 competition at the Cira Centre next to Amtrak's 30th Street Station.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2007 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Entrepreneurship is alive and well, and endlessly studied on the Web. Here are a number of sites to inspire, help and warn the would-be business owners among us. Success stories. Business consultant Scott Allen runs this blog-style discussion of entrepreneurship at About.com, where we caught up on Ben and Jerry (of Ben & Jerry's ice cream fame), and perused "10 Legitimate Businesses You Can Start for Under $20. " These included "Webpreneur," house sitter, and eBay seller. For the latter, the $20 was to go for inventory - from a garage sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE THREE dumped-on employees from "Horrible Bosses" become management in the sequel, but find that life gets no easier. This time, the leads (Charlie Day, Jason Bateman, Jason Sudekis) start their own business, borrow from a pair of not-so-angelic "angel" investors (Chris Pine, Christoph Waltz) and end up trying to raise cash via a hare-brained kidnapping scheme. This allows the cast to have a go at spoofing the conventions of the caper movie - we get an imagined account of the plan unfolding perfectly, then the blundering reality of the three stooges doing everything wrong.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
While the Internet teems with "angel" investors searching for the next jackpot, it suffers from a shortage of guardian angels. Criminals have been wreaking havoc all over cyberspace lately, while governments and corporations have struggled to keep up with them. In February, an international gang of criminals reeled in $40 million in 10 hours by hacking into a database of prepaid debit cards and draining ATMs around the world. Last month, the Associated Press' Twitter feed, allegedly hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army, falsely reported explosions at the White House, causing stocks to plummet.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2000 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
When cable TV executive Joseph W. Cece took over as CEO of Digital Access in January, a Bala Cynwyd-based startup that builds broadband networks in medium-sized markets such as Indianapolis, he confronted a situation many entrepreneurs would die for. Just before Cece came aboard, Digital Access won commitments from a bevy of venture capitalists - including two from Silicon Valley - for $450 million. Digital would have the funds needed to grow quickly. But not all local startups are as flush with venture capital as Digital Access.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three firms have been picked to share office space with The Inquirer and other Philadelphia Media Network outlets in the Project Liberty Digital Incubator , the newest local space dedicated to start-up tech businesses. The firms, selected by PMN adviser and incubator operator Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania , are CloudMine , a smartphone applications developer platform headed by CEO Brendan McCorkle; voter-guide app developer ElectNext , headed by Princeton and Wharton-trained political scientist Keya J. Dannenbaum , and SnipSnap , a print-to-mobile coupon scanner conversion service headed by Ted Mann . "We're providing these companies free rent, free office equipment, and the infrastructure to operate their business, day-to-day, for a six-month period, while they agree to develop a media product for consideration" by The Inquirer, the Daily News , Philadelphia SportsWeek , and Philly.com , spokesman Mark Block said.
NEWS
January 5, 2016
S HALABH JAIN, 30, of Center City, is founder, chairman and CEO of Hyalo Technologies, a biopharmaceutical company in University City. The startup is developing a biodegradable, targeted drug-delivery system called the HyaloSphere that will reduce systemic side effects of drugs and increase patient compliance. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: As a medical student I observed that the compliance rate was low and the systemic side effects were high among some cancer patients or other patients taking prescribed medications.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross and Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals will begin collaborating July 1 to fund innovations in health care and help identify and potentially give seed money to in-house entrepreneurs. Called the Independence Blue Cross-Jefferson Health Innovation Collaboration, the $2 million partnership will be funded evenly by IBC's Blue Cross Center for Health Care Innovation and Jefferson's Innovation Pillar. The partnership creates an entrepreneur-in-residence at Jefferson and funds a fall 2015 "hackathon," an entrepreneurship curriculum, and a business speaker series for medical students and faculty.
NEWS
October 27, 2015
A DRIA BAGDONAVICIUS, 26, of Port Richmond, is co-founder & CEO of PurpleCloud Technologies. Founded in 2011, it has developed a software platform that helps hotels enhance the productivity of their workforces. The technology streams real-time information to hotel staff and analyzes data to assist management in strategic decision-making. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I worked at the Philadelphia Airport Marriott as part of my co-op at Drexel and noticed that they used outdated software, and staff was running around with two-way radios and paper reports.
NEWS
December 16, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County criminal investigator's romance with a mortgage broker has cost her her job and could send her to prison for obtaining a fraudulent loan, officials said. Asha Ritchards, 31, of Sicklerville, appeared yesterday in U.S. District Court in Camden, where she tearfully pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud and admitted she lied on loan applications for a house her then-boyfriend used as a rental property. "She fell in love with this guy. He's a smooth-talking, handsome guy," defense attorney Leonard S. Baker said.
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