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Angel Investors

BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Into the fray of the U.S.-Mexico border-crossing debate rides a Philadelphia start-up - literally. Christini Technologies Inc. this week will prepare nine of its 450DS all-wheel-drive motorcycles for shipment to the U.S. Border Patrol in Texas. Though small, it's an important order in advancing the new business mission of president Steve Christini, who is steering the research-and-development company he formed in 1999 into manufacturing. "The irony is my mom wouldn't let us have motorcycles," said Christini, 42, of Queen Village, who majored in mechanical engineering at Villanova University.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three firms have been picked to share office space with The Inquirer and other Philadelphia Media Network outlets in the Project Liberty Digital Incubator , the newest local space dedicated to start-up tech businesses. The firms, selected by PMN adviser and incubator operator Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania , are CloudMine , a smartphone applications developer platform headed by CEO Brendan McCorkle; voter-guide app developer ElectNext , headed by Princeton and Wharton-trained political scientist Keya J. Dannenbaum , and SnipSnap , a print-to-mobile coupon scanner conversion service headed by Ted Mann . "We're providing these companies free rent, free office equipment, and the infrastructure to operate their business, day-to-day, for a six-month period, while they agree to develop a media product for consideration" by The Inquirer, the Daily News , Philadelphia SportsWeek , and Philly.com , spokesman Mark Block said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Eighteen months ago, entrepreneur Brian Ruby was practically laughing in the face of the recession. He'd just moved his company, Carbon Nanoprobes Inc. , to Chester County from the Seattle area after landing an equity investment from the Life Sciences Greenhouse of Central Pennsylvania . The space in East Whiteland Township had a clean room in which the nanotechnology company would make probes that researchers could use on the tip of...
NEWS
May 24, 2013
While the Internet teems with "angel" investors searching for the next jackpot, it suffers from a shortage of guardian angels. Criminals have been wreaking havoc all over cyberspace lately, while governments and corporations have struggled to keep up with them. In February, an international gang of criminals reeled in $40 million in 10 hours by hacking into a database of prepaid debit cards and draining ATMs around the world. Last month, the Associated Press' Twitter feed, allegedly hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army, falsely reported explosions at the White House, causing stocks to plummet.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2000 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
When cable TV executive Joseph W. Cece took over as CEO of Digital Access in January, a Bala Cynwyd-based startup that builds broadband networks in medium-sized markets such as Indianapolis, he confronted a situation many entrepreneurs would die for. Just before Cece came aboard, Digital Access won commitments from a bevy of venture capitalists - including two from Silicon Valley - for $450 million. Digital would have the funds needed to grow quickly. But not all local startups are as flush with venture capital as Digital Access.
NEWS
December 16, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County criminal investigator's romance with a mortgage broker has cost her her job and could send her to prison for obtaining a fraudulent loan, officials said. Asha Ritchards, 31, of Sicklerville, appeared yesterday in U.S. District Court in Camden, where she tearfully pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud and admitted she lied on loan applications for a house her then-boyfriend used as a rental property. "She fell in love with this guy. He's a smooth-talking, handsome guy," defense attorney Leonard S. Baker said.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Venture capitalists and "angel investors" who fed and were fed by the stock market's 1990s surge say the recent skid in technology-stock values has clouded the premium-priced promise that stampeded corporations, pension funds and rich individuals into investing in unproven companies that hoped to go public at high prices. "A lot of people at these [new] companies have lost tremendous amounts of paper value," said Andrew Martini, head of Bank of America's Radnor private banking office, which concentrates on high-tech executives.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1999 | By Ambre S. Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To boost entrepreneurship among young adults in Philadelphia and Newark, N.J., the Prudential Foundation is giving a $2.5 million grant to extend the Prudential Young Entrepreneur Program, which it launched in July. The nine-week program for adults ages 18 to 30 is taught at the Enterprise Center on Market Street in West Philadelphia, where Prudential officials made their announcement yesterday. The money, which also covers course materials and $15,000 business start-up loans for eligible participants, is to be split between the two target cities.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2012
IN THE REGION Three area Acme stores to close Acme supermarkets in Morrisville, Sharon Hill, and Glassboro are to be shut down by December as part of a broader cost-cutting move in which corporate parent Supervalu Inc. will close 60 stores across the nation, the Minnesota-based company said. A fourth Acme, in Stevensville, Md., is also among those being shuttered as an "underperforming or nonstrategic" store, as are 22 Save-A-Lot locations. The announcement comes as Supervalu tests the market for potential buyers of some or all of the retail- and wholesale-grocery corporation, which consists of Malvern-based Acme Markets, Chicago's Jewel-Osco supermarket chain, a food distribution segment, and other retail grocery chains.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen A. Roth, a former University of Pennsylvania biology department chairman, had been contemplating retirement after leaving the company he'd started based on his own research. Then two guys with a new idea knocked on his door in 2002. At first, Roth, 62, could not believe the concept advanced by biochemist Brad Jameson of the Drexel University College of Medicine: that serotonin, which is a neurotransmitter in the body's central nervous system, is essential for white blood cells to multiply.
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