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Anger

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NEWS
April 23, 1988 | By Mike Franolich and Dwight Ott, Special to The Inquirer
Amid feelings of grief and despair, students in the Deptford school system expressed their anger yesterday over the killing of 12-year-old Kim Marie Anderson, who police say was stabbed to death this week by one of their classmates. Counselors at the Monongahela Junior High School - where the youth accused of the slaying, Kenneth Houseknecht, is a student - told students to purse their lips and not talk with reporters during a day marked by tension, anger and disturbing quiet. Since Tuesday, the brutal killing was the dominant subject in the buzzing hallways of three local schools - Monongahela, Deptford Township High School and the Lake Tract School, where Anderson, known to her friends as Kimberly, was a student.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand and INQUIRER TV WRITER
These are strange times indeed, folks, in the celebrity game. The worst publicity has now become the best kind of publicity you can get. Every time this month, for instance, that TMZ sent out a new gossip bulletin on Lindsay Lohan was a red-letter day for Lifetime. It represented another quarter-million viewers for the Liz Taylor biopic Lohan is currently shooting for the channel. Or take Charlie Sheen. After one of the most depraved runs of misbehavior by a major performer ever, he returns in a new sitcom to rapt curiosity and surprising good will.
SPORTS
July 29, 1994 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
His short fuse always seems to be lit anyway, so it came as no surprise when James Toney, walking time bomb, exploded two days before his title defense tonight against "Prince" Charles Williams (HBO, 10 o'clock) at the MGM Grand. As is his custom, Toney, the International Boxing Federation's super- middleweight champion, arrived for Wednesday's final prefight press conference seething with anger over some real or imagined slight. An hour or so later, when he was asked to pose for publicity photos with Williams, Toney began screaming profanities and lunging at Williams.
SPORTS
July 25, 2012 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Monday's announcement of NCAA sanctions against the Penn State football program was met with bewilderment and anger by a large cross-section of current and former players. But nothing seemed to bewilder and anger former Nittany Lions more than the disclosure that all of Joe Paterno's 111 wins over a 14-year period from 1998 through 2011 were vacated, meaning they won't count in the NCAA record book. Adam Taliaferro, the South Jersey native who was almost paralyzed after being involved in a devastating hit in a 2000 game at Ohio State but made an inspiring recovery, couldn't control his disbelief on Twitter only a few hours after the NCAA delivered its penalties for the actions of university officials in the Jerry Sandusky scandal.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In this week's Greek elections, the far-right, ultranationalist Golden Dawn party, whose members perform Nazi salutes at rallies, got 7 percent of the vote and entered Parliament for the first time. Its leader told journalists to stand upon his arrival at a news conference and ejected those who did not. A sick joke, you say. What's 7 percent? But Golden Dawn's gains are a symbol of a protest vote that fed extremes in Greece and decimated centrist parties, making it impossible to form a government in a country on the edge of economic collapse.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a steady rain Sunday, Judy and Chuck Miller took up spots that have often been occupied by child-abuse victim advocates: the steps of the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. Judy Miller leads the Delaware branch of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), a group that hosted regular protests after the 2011 grand jury report about clergy sex-abuse in Philadelphia. Her return Sunday was prompted by last week's Superior Court ruling that overturned the conviction of Msgr.
NEWS
July 5, 2004 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Fahrenheit 9/11 made me angrier than any movie I've ever seen. It was a good anger, hard, clean and righteous, and I enjoyed it so much that I went back three days later to experience it again. Took two of my sons and two of their friends so they could become angry, too. It's not that I was unaware the movie is less documentary than propaganda. It's not that I buy its conspiracy theories tying the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to Bush cronies' thirst for oil. It is, rather, that the movie brings us face to face with things essential and disturbing about the President, his people and his war. Things like human cost, as in Lila Lipscomb, an erstwhile proud military mother who is literally bent double by grief after losing her son to a war whose righteousness she had not thought to question.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | BY DAVE BARRY
TODAY'S SELF-HELP TOPIC IS: Coping With Anger. There is definitely too much anger in the world today. Pick up almost any newspaper, and the odds are you'll get ink smeared all over your hands. We use a special kind of easy-smear ink, because we know how much it irritates you. But that's not my point. My point is that if you pick up almost any newspaper, you'll see stories of anger raging out of control, of people actually shooting each other over minor traffic disputes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My husband died recently in a fire he started in a drunken rampage. In the aftermath I am left with feelings of extreme sadness and rage. Last night I found some old letters he had written to a woman he'd left me for 20 years ago. (We patched things up and then were married later.) I didn't want to read them, but in the first letter I caught the sentence, "You are the only woman I've ever met who truly changed me. " I immediately tore it to shreds. There were others, but I tossed everything in the box into the trash.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There were prayers and hymns. Hands clutching tissues and damp eyes. But there was little anger evident yesterday morning as about 200 friends and relatives gathered to say goodbye to Nicole M. Leps, a young woman who had appeared to be on the verge of beginning a new career. The absence of anger seemed to please the Rev. John Taxter, who asked the mourners at the 10 a.m. Mass at St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church to keep their spirits aloft and not hold bitterness toward the man who killed Leps.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Pinelands Commission voiced anger and dismay Friday at what they called "accusatory" and "inaccurate" language used by Gov. Christie in a recent letter vetoing the use of certain funds for staff pay raises. Christie accused the board of "confiscation . . . of public funds" and a "gross abuse" of its power. "I don't question the governor's authority" to veto a commission action, Chairman Mark Lohbauer told his colleagues at Friday's monthly meeting. "But I was deeply troubled by the language of the letter," which Lohbauer said "impugns the character of the commission.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLAYTON Donna Truesdell describes her current home in The Villages, Fla., as "Disneyland for adults. " The retirement community has three town squares, countless swimming pools - even its own charter school for employees. So Truesdell, a 64-year-old former program analyst for the Department of Defense, was less than thrilled to learn this week that her future home, in Clayton's Villages at Aberdeen, may get a recycling plant nearby. "I was a little leery of the light-industrial stuff that was already bordering the one side of the development," said Truesdell, who plans to move in this summer to help care for an ailing sister in Sewell.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
SO NOW there's apparently an addendum to the Handbook for Raising Black Sons. In addition to having the talk about how not to come across as a danger or a threat to . . . anyone, there's now a socially acceptable way to behave when those lessons are still not enough to protect your child. I was channel surfing this weekend when I briefly landed on CNN and heard conservative pundit Ben Ferguson's comments on the Jordan Davis case. Davis was the unarmed black Florida teenager who in 2012 was killed by Michael Dunn, a white man who shot Davis for refusing to turn down his "thug music.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
NOTHING touches the psychological third rail as saying that "addicts are selfish. " Since early last Friday morning, when my column on Philip Seymour Hoffman first appeared online, I've been receiving emails from all over the country with various levels of outrage, self-righteousness and, most surprisingly, gratitude. I expected the comments like "I want to bitch slap you" from the woman in Florida who said that her son had just died of a heroin overdose. The supercilious tsk- tsking from those in what I call the industrial-addiction complex was hardly surprising, either.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Disappointment. Anger. Grudging resignation. And, also, gratitude. Those were some of the emotions expressed on New Year's Day by alumni, fans, and other Pennsylvania State University faithful over the expected departure of football coach Bill O'Brien, who brought stability and success to a program on the verge of ruin two years ago in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal. "I thought we had our coach," said Jeff Pawlick, 41, a 1994 graduate who was watching the Mummers Parade near the Kimmel Center on Wednesday afternoon.
SPORTS
January 2, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
WACO, Texas - Maybe it was fate that drew Shawn Oakman to Baylor, a school built on the promise of redemption, one whose athletic program itself has undergone a conversion as dramatic as any sinner's. "When I got here," said Oakman, gazing at the endless Central Texas horizon, "I had a lot of growing up to do. " Twenty-one months ago, the Penn Wood High graduate, a large and highly touted freshman lineman, was booted off Penn State's football team. His GPA was low, his penchant for trouble high.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a steady rain Sunday, Judy and Chuck Miller took up spots that have often been occupied by child-abuse victim advocates: the steps of the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. Judy Miller leads the Delaware branch of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), a group that hosted regular protests after the 2011 grand jury report about clergy sex-abuse in Philadelphia. Her return Sunday was prompted by last week's Superior Court ruling that overturned the conviction of Msgr.
SPORTS
December 30, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Campbell arrived five minutes before his 10 a.m. practice at Collingswood's Sam Coursen Wrestling Center on the day after Christmas. He was wearing an orange Flyers hooded sweatshirt with a dirt mark on the front and corresponding orange and black pajama pants. Campbell, a senior and defending District 28 champion, spoke in a quiet, unemotional tenor that reflected the slow pace at which he walked into the dimly lit gym. Coach Dechlin Moody described the two-year captain as soft-spoken and well-mannered, not a vocal kid and definitely not the kind of personality to come in yelling.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
For supporters of comprehensive immigration reform, 2013 kicked off with great promise. "Now is the time," President Obama said after a bipartisan group of eight senators released its overhaul proposal in January. Their blueprint, most of which was adopted by the Senate in June, includes beefed-up border security and a 13-year path to citizenship for many of the nation's estimated 11.7 million undocumented immigrants. Analysts agreed that Latino voters expected reform, Democrats wanted it, and Republicans needed it to be viable with Hispanics, who constitute the country's fastest-growing voting bloc.
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