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Anger Management

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NEWS
May 31, 2007 | By ANN ROSEN SPECTOR
WHAT THE @$&^$^#$ are anger management classes? It seems like almost every day we're hearing about some notable, including our very own local heiress Susan Tabas Tepper, being assigned to them. Judges across the U.S. are mandating them instead of jail time. So - what are they? Well, for one, they're an unregulated, unevaluated, non-standardized but thriving industry. Did your hot-dog cart go belly up? Start an anger-management program and market the @^$@^%$ out of it. Get downsized from Enron/Tyco/WorldCom?
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Joann Klimkiewicz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pacing in front of the chalkboard, Margie Bates watched the clock, waiting for her students to finish their 20-question quiz. Pencils in hand, they scribbled on pink work sheets, giggling and comparing answers. The students - area parents attending a workshop at Garrettford Elementary School yesterday on stress and anger management - had just completed a quiz to determine their stress levels. Test results showed that they were very high. The event was the second in a series of workshops aimed at easing the bumps along the parenthood route.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The students at Pennypack House School wrestled one recent morning with the witches of Macbeth and the indignities of the Jim Crow era, prompting one teen to ask history teacher Steven DiGiovanni, "What was lynching again?" Then it was time for lunch, so the student body - 46 boys, ages 14 through 17 - formed two lines as they waited to be led to the dining area one floor below. Each boy, dressed in a dark green jumpsuit and an identification bracelet, was thoroughly patted down.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before Indiana Pacers forward Ron Artest went crashing into the stands, touching off an ugly chair-tossing brawl and a vociferous national debate, he spent time in a program designed to prevent just such an eruption: Anger management. Today, a few short years after it simmered to prominence, anger-management training has become widely accepted and zealously applied, embraced by Fortune 500 companies selling anything from produce to propane and federal-government agencies supervising anyone from probationers to postal workers.
NEWS
April 27, 2004 | By Stephen J. Cimbala
One of the more interesting signs of our times is the rise of interest in "anger-management" seminars, training regimens, and theories. The assumption behind anger management is apparently thus: What makes you angry is your fault. You can control your emotions, so learn to ignore things that might otherwise cause you indignation or righteous wrath. It's all in your head: Think goodness when badness surrounds you. Smile, get your teeth capped, talk in corporate clich?s, and, when all else fails, warble "Singing in the Rain.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
A SCHOOL POLICE officer who was fired by then-Superintendent Arlene Ackerman for pummeling a Frankford High School football player in 2009 is working again for the district. Officer Aaron Branson was manning metal detectors at the entrance to Horace Furness High School in South Philadelphia on Friday. He was unavailable for comment, the principal, Daniel Peou, told the Daily News . Branson got his job back through an arbitration proceeding "subject to certain personnel conditions . . . [that the district]
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony "Wazoo" Hughes passed a course in "anger management" at Rahway State Prison in New Jersey, but it didn't help him keep his cool when he was confronted by a welcher in his alleged drug operation on Oct. 16, 1988. Hughes blew up at John Gooden, 31, and pumped five bullets into him in the hallway of Gooden's apartment building on Christian Street near 15th, Assistant District Attorney Charles Ehrlich said. Ehrlich said Gooden had been selling crack cocaine for Hughes and Hughes believed he was holding back $200 owed for drug sales.
NEWS
June 30, 2002 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On the first day of class, a roll of toilet paper helps break the ice. For each square the parents take, they must share one intimate detail about themselves. Instead of Bingo, the group plays Drugo. The game card offers clues regarding various controlled substances, and the players try to guess the drug, alcohol or tobacco of choice. A free program starting in July for Paulsboro parents and children puts some lighthearted twists on touchy topics. Counselors from Services to Overcome Drug Abuse Among Teenagers will take over Paulsboro High School's parenting center for an hour on Thursdays through August.
NEWS
June 1, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A West Chester career criminal reinforced his need for an anger management course yesterday in Chester County Court. After an outburst in front of an unreceptive judge, Frederick T. Ray III decided to forgo his pending jury trial and plead guilty to attempted burglary, terroristic threats, possessing an instrument of crime, and simple assault. Ray opted for a plea bargain negotiated by Assistant District Attorney Michelle E. Frei and his attorney, Assistant Public Defender Francesca A. Iacovangelo, that will send him to prison for five to 10 years, followed by two years of probation.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students here won't be greeted by police officers or metal detectors when classes start Thursday. But the district has designed a system - including bomb-threat drills and the teaching of anger management in health class - to make sure students stay safe, Assistant Superintendent Marie Louis said. While the concept of emergency planning is not new, she said, the schools in the past provided only fragmented material that often was confusing to authorities. Now a 33-page emergency plan outlines procedures that the district's 10 schools must follow to prepare for emergencies.
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NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The students at Pennypack House School wrestled one recent morning with the witches of Macbeth and the indignities of the Jim Crow era, prompting one teen to ask history teacher Steven DiGiovanni, "What was lynching again?" Then it was time for lunch, so the student body - 46 boys, ages 14 through 17 - formed two lines as they waited to be led to the dining area one floor below. Each boy, dressed in a dark green jumpsuit and an identification bracelet, was thoroughly patted down.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia-based rapper Meek Mill was released from a city jail Tuesday afternoon after serving nearly five months behind bars for failing to comply with a probation sentence that conflicted with his tour schedule. Common Pleas Court Judge Genece E. Brinkley granted early parole to the 27-year-old, whose legal name is Robert Williams, on the condition that he complete a plan of community service and treatment before he resumes concerts, said Tasha Jamerson, spokeswoman for District Attorney Seth Williams.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't just "hundreds of dollars," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson now acknowledges. It was just over $10,000. But he still says that all the money donated to his Peace Not Guns group was handled honestly, if somewhat sloppily, and that critics of its unauthorized use of a federal charity designation are missing the point. "The mission of Peace Not Guns is pure," the Philadelphia councilman said during a recent interview. To make his case about the antiviolence organization, which he often trumpets as the cornerstone of 15 years of community service, he invited a reporter to sift through a color-coded chart and 70 pages of documents spread across a conference table in his lawyer's office.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Bucks County woman killed by her ex-husband in front of her 16-year-old daughter Thursday has been identified by the District Attorney's Office as Violeta Isackov. She had been the second wife of Kenneth Philipp, who, according to court records, had a history of menacing behavior. Philipp, 50, was killed Thursday in a shootout with police around 6 p.m., after he killed Isackov and injured her daughter by firing three shots from a 12-gauge shotgun point-blank into their car outside a Lower Southampton dress shop, according to District Attorney David Heckler.
SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
B EN ROETHLISBERGER'S sprained right shoulder is just the start of his problems. The Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback said Wednesday he also dislocated a rib while getting sacked in the third quarter of Monday night's win against Kansas City. Roethlisberger sprained the SC joint in his shoulder on the play but says the rib issue is a bigger concern. Roethlisberger said doctors are concerned the rib could cut into his aorta. He has been ruled out of Sunday's game against the Baltimore Ravens.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
A SCHOOL POLICE officer who was fired by then-Superintendent Arlene Ackerman for pummeling a Frankford High School football player in 2009 is working again for the district. Officer Aaron Branson was manning metal detectors at the entrance to Horace Furness High School in South Philadelphia on Friday. He was unavailable for comment, the principal, Daniel Peou, told the Daily News . Branson got his job back through an arbitration proceeding "subject to certain personnel conditions . . . [that the district]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I am dating someone whom I love but who has a very short fuse, gets frustrated easily, and blames me when he cannot resolve a problem. I have asked him, while with our counselor, to get anger management or therapy on his own. He keeps avoiding going, even though he acknowledges this issue freely and willingly. I don't know how much more I can take, walking on eggshells. The reason I don't cut and run isn't just love, but also because I know his anger is pain that is unresolved (emotionally and physically abused as a child and a recent, sudden death of a parent)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand and INQUIRER TV WRITER
These are strange times indeed, folks, in the celebrity game. The worst publicity has now become the best kind of publicity you can get. Every time this month, for instance, that TMZ sent out a new gossip bulletin on Lindsay Lohan was a red-letter day for Lifetime. It represented another quarter-million viewers for the Liz Taylor biopic Lohan is currently shooting for the channel. Or take Charlie Sheen. After one of the most depraved runs of misbehavior by a major performer ever, he returns in a new sitcom to rapt curiosity and surprising good will.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | Ellen Gray
ANGER MANAGEMENT. 9 p.m. Thursday, FX. CHARLIE SHEEN'S always been a bit like StarKist's Charlie the Tuna: No one wants him for his good taste. Certainly FX, which in the wake of the former "Two and a Half Men" star's nasty divorce from CBS picked up 10 episodes of his new comedy — with an option for 90 more — wouldn't expect "Anger Management" to be "Frasier. " Home to "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" and "Sons of Anarchy" as well as to "Wilfred," "Louie" and the new "Brand X with Russell Brand" (all three of which follow a double-shot of Sheen's new show on Thursday)
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