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Angkor Wat

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TRAVEL
July 28, 2013
Cambodia has joined hands with Australia in an effort to use the Internet to help preserve its fabled Angkor Wat temple complex, the Australian Embassy announced this month. Name: angkorsunsets.com How it works: As part of a master plan to limit damage to the complex, a recently opened website, Angkor Sunset Finder, will give tourists recommendations for where in the 400-square-kilometer (160-square-mile) complex one can watch spectacular sunsets. Why it's needed: A handful of well-publicized spots from which to watch the setting sun attract too many tourists, endangering the place's physical and aesthetic integrity.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne
As we were leaving the temple of Angkor Wat a boy who looked to be about 10 years old sidled up alongside us. It's hard to guess someone's age in Cambodia, where the people are slight, even by Asian standards. His little legs matched our stride as he walked with us and offered to sell 10 postcards for a dollar. After touring Asia for two months, we've grown accustomed to aggressive hawkers, so we usually put on our game face and stoically work our way through the throngs selling everything from T-shirts to ginseng to who knows what.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, FOR THE INQUIRER
ANGKOR, Cambodia — We bounced along the road in a tuk-tuk — picture a rickshaw attached to a moped — anxious for our first glimpse through the trees of the temple of Angkor Wat. Our imaginations flared with visions of hacking our way through the overgrown jungle, then quietly discovering the nearly 900-year-old stone towers with only a solitary monkey looking on. Perhaps we've watched too many Indiana Jones movies. Angkor is the largest, and perhaps most exotic, religious complex in the world.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At some point during the chaotic war years of the 1970s and 1980s, a 1,000-year-old bust of Shiva was separated from its sculpted sandstone body near the ancient city of Angkor. The 16-inch head was a priceless treasure, one of hundreds of sculptures looted from the legendary site. The mystery of where Shiva's head went has now been solved. But how it left Angkor Wat and reemerged halfway around the world has yet to be revealed. Since 1985, the bust has been in the collection of that Western temple of sophisticated art, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. It was not until April, three years after the Angkor Conservancy distributed a catalog with photos of 100 pieces of stolen art, that the Met acknowledged owning the bust.
NEWS
May 21, 1993 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At first there was only a long whistle in the distance. But that was enough. Fifteen hundred villagers hit the ground inside Angkor Wat, the grand temple of history where they had taken refuge. Second by second, the whistle became louder, and a minute later a rocket exploded in the nearby countryside. "No place is safe," said Kean Kaeng, 34, who was shot by the Khmer Rouge in a May 3 predawn attack, which left seven people dead and dozens injured. " . . . It's an impossible situation for us. " The terror felt here is sweeping Cambodia as the nation prepares for first- ever multiparty elections on Sunday.
TRAVEL
July 26, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
SIEM REAP, Cambodia - I saw Angkor Wat at dusk and burst into tears. I just wasn't ready. Riding a tuk-tuk , a conveyance bolted to a motorbike, we came out of a forest, and there it was. Across an encircling moat two football fields wide, the storied "pink light" fell on the 900-year-old walls and towers of the west entrance. Spectacular, ineffable, it beggared its advance notice. It took 500,000 workers and three million tons of sandstone to build Angkor Wat, "Temple City," a religious monument and administrative center of about 155 square miles that once was the heart of the Khmer Empire, and an urban complex of a million people.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Andrew Bender, FOR THE INQUIRER
I have just climbed a hillock of fallen blocks of decaying stone - each maybe 18 inches tall by three feet long - and from atop a wall that somehow still stands, I survey the corncob stupas, or towers, of Ta Prohm. Thirty-nine of them once graced this temple of several hundred acres, said to require a staff of nearly 80,000, including 2,704 officials, 2,202 assistants, 18 great priests and 615 dancers. Its treasury included more than 1,200 pounds of golden dishes, 4,540 precious stones, 512 silk beds, 523 parasols.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's be honest: It was the specter of tigers, temples, and tom yam soup that led my husband and me to honeymoon in Southeast Asia. We wanted an adventure to remember, on a continent where neither of us had been. But as I researched our trip, I realized that we should spend at least a little time practicing "voluntourism," giving back to people who are still struggling for the basics after decades of war and poverty. We found a way to have it all in Siem Reap, Cambodia, home of the ancient temple complex Angkor Wat - and Ponheary Ly, a tour guide who considers it her mission to help educate as many Cambodian children as possible.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By Somanette Seang FOR THE INQUIRER
It had been more than 26 years since I was in Cambodia. I survived the Khmer Rouge genocide of the 1970s and, at age 7, emigrated to the United States with my mother, grandmother, aunt and cousin. Until last summer, I never felt ready to return to Cambodia because I struggled with feelings of survivor's guilt. Why did I live when an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians died? My fear was that I would be just another tourist instead of Khmer. In the end, I was a Khmer tourist. I arranged to volunteer as an English teacher in Siem Reap through the nonprofit organization Journeys Within Our Community (www.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Amid a surge of interest in travel to Southeast Asia, the U.S. State Department has revised its consular information sheet on Cambodia to note precautions being taken by U.S. Embassy personnel there, including avoiding train and boat travel. The advisory calls attention to the limited military conflict between the government and Khmer Rouge insurgents, which "frequently intensifies during the dry season (November through May) and is possible in a number of areas, including along the border with Thailand, and especially in Battambang Province.
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TRAVEL
May 23, 2016 | By Bill Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
SA DEC, Vietnam - The riverfront market is a throbbing chaos of sights, smells, and sounds. Little stalls of free enterprise proffer bananas, cucumbers, coconuts, carrots, mangoes, live chickens and ducks, skinned rats, pig eyes, giant prawns. Eels, crabs, and fish squirm in shallow metal tubs. Frogs and turtles wriggle in buckets. There is a heterogenous and resurgent stream of buyers and sellers. Vendors shout out the ripeness of their fruit. Wise-eyed shoppers sort through vegetables, seeking perfection.
TRAVEL
July 26, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
SIEM REAP, Cambodia - I saw Angkor Wat at dusk and burst into tears. I just wasn't ready. Riding a tuk-tuk , a conveyance bolted to a motorbike, we came out of a forest, and there it was. Across an encircling moat two football fields wide, the storied "pink light" fell on the 900-year-old walls and towers of the west entrance. Spectacular, ineffable, it beggared its advance notice. It took 500,000 workers and three million tons of sandstone to build Angkor Wat, "Temple City," a religious monument and administrative center of about 155 square miles that once was the heart of the Khmer Empire, and an urban complex of a million people.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2013
Cambodia has joined hands with Australia in an effort to use the Internet to help preserve its fabled Angkor Wat temple complex, the Australian Embassy announced this month. Name: angkorsunsets.com How it works: As part of a master plan to limit damage to the complex, a recently opened website, Angkor Sunset Finder, will give tourists recommendations for where in the 400-square-kilometer (160-square-mile) complex one can watch spectacular sunsets. Why it's needed: A handful of well-publicized spots from which to watch the setting sun attract too many tourists, endangering the place's physical and aesthetic integrity.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, FOR THE INQUIRER
ANGKOR, Cambodia — We bounced along the road in a tuk-tuk — picture a rickshaw attached to a moped — anxious for our first glimpse through the trees of the temple of Angkor Wat. Our imaginations flared with visions of hacking our way through the overgrown jungle, then quietly discovering the nearly 900-year-old stone towers with only a solitary monkey looking on. Perhaps we've watched too many Indiana Jones movies. Angkor is the largest, and perhaps most exotic, religious complex in the world.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne
As we were leaving the temple of Angkor Wat a boy who looked to be about 10 years old sidled up alongside us. It's hard to guess someone's age in Cambodia, where the people are slight, even by Asian standards. His little legs matched our stride as he walked with us and offered to sell 10 postcards for a dollar. After touring Asia for two months, we've grown accustomed to aggressive hawkers, so we usually put on our game face and stoically work our way through the throngs selling everything from T-shirts to ginseng to who knows what.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's be honest: It was the specter of tigers, temples, and tom yam soup that led my husband and me to honeymoon in Southeast Asia. We wanted an adventure to remember, on a continent where neither of us had been. But as I researched our trip, I realized that we should spend at least a little time practicing "voluntourism," giving back to people who are still struggling for the basics after decades of war and poverty. We found a way to have it all in Siem Reap, Cambodia, home of the ancient temple complex Angkor Wat - and Ponheary Ly, a tour guide who considers it her mission to help educate as many Cambodian children as possible.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By Somanette Seang FOR THE INQUIRER
It had been more than 26 years since I was in Cambodia. I survived the Khmer Rouge genocide of the 1970s and, at age 7, emigrated to the United States with my mother, grandmother, aunt and cousin. Until last summer, I never felt ready to return to Cambodia because I struggled with feelings of survivor's guilt. Why did I live when an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians died? My fear was that I would be just another tourist instead of Khmer. In the end, I was a Khmer tourist. I arranged to volunteer as an English teacher in Siem Reap through the nonprofit organization Journeys Within Our Community (www.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Cambodia, they are called Apsara - heavenly dancers with sweet-tempered smiles, perfectly coiffed hair and agile figures arched easily into difficult poses. They adorn the walls of the Angkor Wat temple and inhabit legends about the origins of the Khmer people. Graceful, delicate and, above all, pure, they are the defining image of Cambodian femininity - a standard all Cambodian girls are expected to attain. For Cambodians living in America, the standard remains unchanged.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Andrew Bender, FOR THE INQUIRER
I have just climbed a hillock of fallen blocks of decaying stone - each maybe 18 inches tall by three feet long - and from atop a wall that somehow still stands, I survey the corncob stupas, or towers, of Ta Prohm. Thirty-nine of them once graced this temple of several hundred acres, said to require a staff of nearly 80,000, including 2,704 officials, 2,202 assistants, 18 great priests and 615 dancers. Its treasury included more than 1,200 pounds of golden dishes, 4,540 precious stones, 512 silk beds, 523 parasols.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At some point during the chaotic war years of the 1970s and 1980s, a 1,000-year-old bust of Shiva was separated from its sculpted sandstone body near the ancient city of Angkor. The 16-inch head was a priceless treasure, one of hundreds of sculptures looted from the legendary site. The mystery of where Shiva's head went has now been solved. But how it left Angkor Wat and reemerged halfway around the world has yet to be revealed. Since 1985, the bust has been in the collection of that Western temple of sophisticated art, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. It was not until April, three years after the Angkor Conservancy distributed a catalog with photos of 100 pieces of stolen art, that the Met acknowledged owning the bust.
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