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Angst

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A couple of years ago, a New York artist staged a conceptual work in which viewers were issued binoculars and instructed to train them on a nearby apartment house, where a number of little dramas proceeded to unfold in selected windows. Kevin Del Aguila's 6 Story Building, which runs through Sunday in a production by the New Hope Performing Arts Festival, is rather like that piece of voyeuristic art: In six short comedies and a prologue, it peeks behind the curtains of a half-dozen apartments to survey a representative sample of urban angst and yearning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
The popularity of teen angst on TV and in films offers a steady stream of brooding young actors who walk lonely streets in long black coats, trying to emote dark feelings. Often they are so wooden that the scenes come across as trite. That's not the case with The Art of Getting By. The film is loaded with teen-angst moments that have a more realistic feel because of superb performances by Freddie Highmore and Emma Roberts. Their acting resonates with such depth that the angst isn't a dark costume slipped over the actors but a deep feeling consumed and then sweated out through every pore.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | By Leonard W. Boasberg
Aw, gee, I feel so sorry for those kids in their 20s, saying - as some of them are, according to recent reports - they are "stuck in a no-man's land of doubt and indecision. " There's even a new book that describes this angst: Quarterlife Crisis: The Unique Challenges of Life in Your Twenties, by a couple of 25-year-old women. When I was in my 20s, I didn't have to worry about, like, you know, what I was going to wear. My wardrobe was given to me, free, by the U.S. Army. The Army gave me all the food I could eat. It wasn't very good, but the portions were big. I remember something called Spam.
NEWS
January 31, 2006 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Apparently, that perpetually insecure and tormented dude that Staind singer-guitarist Aaron Lewis portrays in his band's neo-grunge songs is no act. When Lewis thanked members of the near-capacity crowd at the Electric Factory on Sunday for their continued patronage, in a somnolent monotone consistent with his singing voice (imagine comedian Steven Wright addressing a rock crowd), his brief rap was awash in self-doubt: "For some strange reason, you've allowed us to stick around and continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Like James Dean smoking and brooding through Rebel Without a Cause, Robert Pattinson puffs and sulks - often, impressively, at the same time - in the intense romantic drama Remember Me . Twilight's pale and immortal lover boy, adopting a New York accent and a slouchy demeanor (the better to reflect his directionlessness by!), is rich kid Tyler Hawkins, an NYU mopester who meets a girl from his global politics class and woos her accordingly. Actually, it's a cynical game Tyler's playing: Egged on by his roommate, Aidan (Tate Ellington)
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | By SUSAN CRAIN BAKOS
I have lost two friends to the self-actualization movement. Both fell victim to Forum, Werner Erhardt's new, improved version of est. (Less touchy- feely, primal scream-oriented than est, Forum is a philosophy of how to get more out of life acceptable to baby boom professionals looking less for inner serenity than a kinder, gentler version of the Gordon Gecko Creed: Greed is Good.) The male friend was 40; the female, 35. Since lamenting her undeveloped breasts at age 10, she has been ahead of her chronological crisis points.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Using the medium of Wallace and Gromit and Gumby, Israeli filmmaker Tatia Rosenthal turns her clay figures into real people in $9.99 , a wise, wistful study of hope and dread. Set in and around an apartment building in an unnamed town, $9.99 was adapted from the short stories of Israeli writer Etgar Keret. His take on life is wry, and pretty dark: In the opening scene of this strikingly crafted film, a homeless man puts a gun to his head when a passerby balks at giving him a dollar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A trio of earnest, searching, and not terribly sophisticated short films about the angst experienced by gay teenagers, Boys Life addresses issues of sexual identity, peer pressure, young love (and lust), parent-son relationships, and swimming-pool grope sessions. The three works offer similarly themed views on the confusion and catharses of young gay men coming out in America. Two of the shorts hail from NYU film-school grads, the other from an alumnus of USC's cinema program, and all take a sort of autobiographical Afterschool Special approach to the subject.
NEWS
December 2, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roiling financial news - day after day after day - is stirring macro- and microeconomics into a psychic stew of stress for a lot of people. As companies that once seemed invincible keep trickling down the drain, Joe and Jane Citizen are seeing a slide in the personal investments they'd been banking on to carry them and their families through life - 30 percent loss has been an oft-cited figure for some 401(k) funds over the last few months. And that's generating the kinds of emotional responses triggered by unanticipated, uncontrollable events that shake lives and lifestyles.
NEWS
May 25, 2005
THANK YOU, Rotan Lee, for articulating my own thoughts and angst about government's practice of elevating the unworthy ("A few thoughts on Malcolm & Ron"). My view is from the inside as a civil-service employee. I initially thought it was my opportunity to compete on an equal playing field to advance my career. But to my shock and deep disappointment, what I have found is a system that rewards failure, that is awash with managers and administrators who are not only self-serving and unethical but who choose those to reward based on their willingness to carry out management's agenda (albeit illegal or immoral)
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NEWS
October 9, 2015
I WRITE IN PROSE, but I think in poetry. Clearly, I lack the ability to distill the great human emotions into words so fine and spare that they will one day be included in anthologies and taught to bright-eyed students, secretly hoping there's a Cliff Notes version somewhere. But there is inside of me a white Maya Angelou or a non-agoraphobic Emily Dickinson, struggling to emerge from the "Chris-alis. " (And that is why I am not a poet, but let's move on.) Even if I can't write it, I devour it. My preferences run to iambic pentameter and rhymes, because I respect any effort to actually work at something.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 18 years of innovative experimental theater, cringingly clunky one-man shows, and everything in between, the 2014 Fringe Festival officially opens Friday with the most ambitious lineup yet. There's the epic The Four Seasons Restaurant by acclaimed Italian director Romeo Castellucci and Soc├Četas Raffaello Sanzio, a meditation on absence set to the soundtrack of black holes. There's a cast of 100 non-actors in 100% Philadelphia , from Germany's Rimini Protokoll. There's artist Mary Mattingly's live-in WetLand installation (think Hurricane Katrina meets Waterworld )
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colin Quinn is in anguish over the state of our nation. We're in a quagmire of despair, with an economy that refuses to bounce back, a White House rocked by security leaks, and a Congress so at odds with itself, it forced the federal government to shut down. "Everyone has a vision of this country, and the vision is so divided right now," Quinn, 54, said Tuesday in a phone chat, "that I can't imagine anything else happening but the breakup of the country. " The former Saturday Night Live player isn't exactly celebrated as a political scientist, but he thinks he has the answer for what ails us: Don't fear the fragmentation of the nation, but embrace it. "Abolish the United States," he said.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
Fear and loathing shouldn't describe parents' feelings as the first day of school approaches. But in urban districts facing fiscal and staffing issues, they can't help it. Philadelphia's schools open Monday with no guarantee that the district will have enough money to finish the academic year. Promises have been made, but not enough money has been added to the district's budget. Months ago, schools Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. announced that the district faced a $304 million gap in its $2.7 billion budget and asked the state, city, and employee unions each to kick in something to solve the problem.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Renewed concerns that central banks will ease off their support for the global economy hit the U.S. markets Tuesday, wiping out their gains for the month. It looked bad from the start. Indexes began sliding from the opening bell, trailing markets in Asia and Europe, which were rattled when the Bank of Japan decided not to take any new steps to spur growth in the world's third-largest economy. The word out of Japan added to questions surrounding global central banks, investors said.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The high school senior was wait listed at Villanova University, her number-one pick. So she sent the admissions office a white sneaker with the letter V painted in blue and a note: "I've already got one foot in the door. Help me get the other foot in as well. " Such gimmicks, though creative, rarely make a difference in the decision-making, officials say. But the tactic underscores the often intense emotion around the next stage of the admission process: the waiting game. While students across the nation are weighing offers from schools along with financial aid, some students have the complication of not having been accepted at their top school - but also not having been rejected.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Why didn't Philadelphia Magazine title its March cover story simply "Fear of Black People"? The catastrophically misguided article, "Being White in Philly," is basically devoid of facts while making the dubious claim that "in so many quarters, simply discussing race is seen as racist. " Staff writer Robert Huber offered anonymity to everyone he interviewed. He based the article on highly selective anecdotes while assuming his views were universally shared by readers. To wit, "I've begun to think that most people stopped looking around at large segments of our city, at our poorest and most dangerous neighborhoods, a long time ago. " Give Huber and his editors credit: The story accurately reflects the title "Being White.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Reprinted from Thursday's edition. There is no Starbucks in sleepy Gatlin, S.C., laments young Ethan Wate, so it's completely understandable that he wants out. High school is a drag, too, and the sole movie theater can't even get the titles right on its marquee. But then Lena Duchannes, glamorously Goth, moves into town, and Ethan's world is upended. It's as if a spell had been cast, which, in the over-the-top supernatural teen romance Beautiful Creatures , isn't that surprising.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the first day of 1863, as the Civil War raged on, President Lincoln proclaimed all the slaves in the rebellious Confederate states to be "forever free. " With his Emancipation Proclamation, whose 150th anniversary the United States celebrates this week, Lincoln made the end of slavery a Civil War goal. As PBS's ambitious documentary miniseries The Abolitionists shows, Lincoln's words came at the end of a decadeslong antislavery campaign led by a tiny group of activists whose fervor alienated them from the mainstream of American life.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
It's my first Christmas with my boyfriend, and choosing a gift for him is impossible. We've all heard the lament, what do you get the man who has everything? Well, my boyfriend is the man who needs everything. He's a musician and travels frequently. He'd be happy with his guitar and whatever clothes fit in a backpack. He doesn't think much of material possessions. Doesn't he know the true meaning of Christmas? I've heard him say he needs basics, like T-shirts, but if I get him a pack of Hanes, I'll feel like his mom. And while a man can give a woman lingerie, I can't bring myself to present my boyfriend with "manties.
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