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Animal Rights Activists

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NEWS
July 25, 1993 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes what you don't want is what you get at McDonald's. Ronald McDonald, dressed to the teeth and in full makeup, got it right in the face yesterday when a couple of animal-rights activists - one dressed in a cow costume - threw a cream pie at him to protest the corporation's dependence on beef. McDonald's uses 100 percent ground beef for its renowned Big Mac's and Quarter Pounders. During the brief scuffle around dinner time under the golden arches at 101 South 52d Street in West Philadelphia, Mr. McDonald, who was on a publicity stop, was approached by two hecklers.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MAYBE IT was the phony penises. After years of escalating tensions between the Philadelphia Gun Club and the animal-rights activists who object to the club's semiannual pigeon shoots, club members have filed a federal lawsuit accusing the activists of stalking, harassment, trespass, intimidation, defamation, libel and privacy invasion. In a 21-page complaint filed last Friday, eight club members claim that activists from Showing Animals Respect and Kindness (SHARK) harassed and blocked them as they drove in and out of the club's Bensalem grounds, spied on them both at the club and elsewhere, posted their pictures and other personal information online and even glued rubber penises along the club's fence.
SPORTS
September 22, 2010 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Animal-rights activists were divided Tuesday night over Michael Vick's promotion to Eagles starting quarterback. Tom Hickey Sr., who was critical of the team's original decision to sign Michael Vick, expressed renewed outrage over the Eagles' decision. "This is just another disappointing move of many that the Eagles have done since they signed him," said Hickey, a member of the Pennsylvania Dog Law Advisory board and founder of DogPAC, an animal welfare organization. "The same hands that just three years ago were torturing and killing animals in the most brutal possible ways are now going to be given a starting job because he can throw a football.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | Associated Press
TRENTON - Animal-rights activists seeking to protest the state's black bear hunt will head to court Monday to try to persuade a judge to allow them to demonstrate at a bear check station. The advocates conceded Friday there wasn't enough time for them to challenge a court decision allowing the state's six-day bear hunt to begin Monday. They then got informal approval from a state Department of Environmental Protection official to demonstrate at the Franklin bear check station in Sussex County, according to Doris Lin, an attorney for the protesters.
NEWS
September 5, 1989 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
They gathered on the hillside like Indians in an old Western, and at 8 a.m. yesterday, as the first crisp shotgun blast reverberated from the valley below, they moved in to confront the enemy. Carrying cardboard cutouts of birds in flight and placards denouncing the "slaughter" of living creatures, about 400 animal-rights activists began what was to be the loudest and most emotional protest to date of the 56-year- old Labor Day pigeon shoot in this Schuylkill County community. The event, which raises about $10,000 a year to support the local park, has become the focal point of the burgeoning animal-rights movement in Pennsylvania, as well as a rallying point for sympathizers nationally.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | By MARK McDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
Animal-rights activists proved themselves to be meaner than a junkyard dog yesterday as they continued their quest to take control of the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. First they elected two of their own to the SPCA board, and then they frustrated old-line board members enough to have them adjourn the annual meeting, held at SPCA headquarters, 350 E. Erie Ave. Though holding only three of 15 seats on the board, the activists so thoroughly monopolized the four-hour meeting with new voting members that they quickly sought the firing of the 12 other board members for their alleged failure to support humane causes.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 2 p.m. yesterday, as dozens of animal-rights activists picketed the Route 70 entrance to Garden State Park, Bob Karlstromer stood inside holding a microphone for the first pig race of the day at the New Jersey State Fair. "These pigs are 4 months old," he told a crowd forming around a 150-foot oval track. "They've been racing since they were 7 weeks old. They really know what they're doing. "The pig is fifth in animal intelligence. That's smarter than a horse, smarter than a dog. " He yelled, "Load up!
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three protesters wearing white lab coats and gas masks and carrying buckets of urine stormed toward the Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories on Lancaster Avenue yesterday to anoint the building, but ended up dousing several Radnor police officers, police reported. A group of 30 protesters - members of the same group that got steamed over the way a chef cooked a lobster on the Today show in May - showed up to condemn Wyeth's use of the urine of pregnant mares in the manufacturing of Premarin, an estrogen replacement therapy for menopausal women.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 30 years of being legally protected, the bobcat is on the verge of being hunted again in Pennsylvania. Tomorrow, the state Game Commission likely will approve a lottery through which 290 hunters each will be permitted to shoot or trap one bobcat. The commission, which gave preliminary approval for the hunt in January, was to hear comments from the public today in Harrisburg. Jerry Feaser, a commission spokesman, said for years hunters have been asking to hunt bobcats, the state's only feline predators.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MAYBE IT was the phony penises. After years of escalating tensions between the Philadelphia Gun Club and the animal-rights activists who object to the club's semiannual pigeon shoots, club members have filed a federal lawsuit accusing the activists of stalking, harassment, trespass, intimidation, defamation, libel and privacy invasion. In a 21-page complaint filed last Friday, eight club members claim that activists from Showing Animals Respect and Kindness (SHARK) harassed and blocked them as they drove in and out of the club's Bensalem grounds, spied on them both at the club and elsewhere, posted their pictures and other personal information online and even glued rubber penises along the club's fence.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. - Pat Derby - a former Hollywood trainer for Flipper, Lassie and other performing animals who later devoted her life to protecting them from abuse - has died at age 69, her organization said Monday. Derby, who had throat cancer, died Friday at her home in the biggest of the animal sanctuaries run by her organization, the Performing Animal Welfare Society, or PAWS, in San Andreas, Calif., outside Sacramento. During the 1960s and '70s, Derby worked on television shows like "Flipper," "Daktari," "Gunsmoke" and "Lassie," and wrangled a pair of pumas, Chauncey and Christopher, that appeared with model-actress Farrah Fawcett in popular commercials for the Mercury Cougar.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
During a vigil to memorialize scores of Canada geese that animal-rights activists say were probably killed in Voorhees, David Sauder and Linda Richardson agreed and disagreed. Sauder, president of Animal Rights Activists of New Jersey Inc., worried that the geese had been slaughtered in what he deemed a cruel and unnecessary act. Richardson, while lamenting a possible violent end, was relieved the geese were gone, an absence that would drastically reduce residents' fight against the filth of goose poop.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a vigil to memorialize scores of Canada geese that animal-rights activists say were probably killed in Voorhees, David Sauder and Linda Richardson agreed and disagreed. Sauder, president of Animal Rights Activists of New Jersey Inc., worried that the geese had been slaughtered in what he deemed a cruel and unnecessary act. Richardson, while lamenting a possible violent end, was relieved the geese were gone, an absence that would drastically reduce residents' fight against the filth of goose poop.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - The "diving horse" has been put out to pasture before its planned comeback. The owner of Atlantic City's Steel Pier said Tuesday he's dropping a plan to bring back the legendary stunt after animal-rights activists lodged fierce criticism. The act, which ran on the pier from the 1920s to the 1970s, featured a horse and a rider plunging into a 12-foot-deep tank from a platform 40 feet high. Anthony Catanoso, whose family owns the historic pier, said he's no longer interested in reviving the attraction, which had helped make the pier famous last century.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, vellav@phillynews.com 215-854-5905
EDWARD COFFIN said yesterday was "bittersweet," even though he ended it $15,000 richer. The city agreed to pay Coffin, an animal-rights activist, that sum as a settlement. He sued the city last year with the help of the state's branch of the American Civil Liberties Union after he was illegally arrested during a supermarket protest in 2009. "The money is appreciated, but my ultimate goal was to get better First Amendment training for Philadelphia police officers," he said. "I think I've made some progress, but it's still a major problem.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | Associated Press
TRENTON - Animal-rights activists seeking to protest the state's black bear hunt will head to court Monday to try to persuade a judge to allow them to demonstrate at a bear check station. The advocates conceded Friday there wasn't enough time for them to challenge a court decision allowing the state's six-day bear hunt to begin Monday. They then got informal approval from a state Department of Environmental Protection official to demonstrate at the Franklin bear check station in Sussex County, according to Doris Lin, an attorney for the protesters.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
ALL BUT ONE of the exotic animals let loose from a 73-acre home zoo in Ohio this week have been either killed or captured, officials said yesterday, with the one unaccounted for - a monkey - believed to have been eaten by one of the big cats. But the bizarre case of Terry Thompson, 62, who threw open his menagerie's cages on Tuesday before taking his own life, is far from over. Among the latest disclosures was that Thompson and his wife owed at least $68,000 in unpaid income and property taxes, according to court records.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since moving to a two-acre wooded lot in a rural section of Winslow in the mid-1970s, Ivan Murray and his family have kept dogs. But what had been a couple of dogs now is 26. The animals, mostly pit bulls, live outside year-round among junked cars and trailers spread across the property. "They're like my kids," said Murray's mother, Loretta, 76, a school bus driver. "They don't bother anyone. If I tell my puppies someone's coming, they'll stay quiet. " The oversize collection of canines has attracted the attention of animal-control officers and animal-rights activists, who have attempted to have the dogs removed from the property.
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