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Animal Shelter

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NEWS
January 14, 1986 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Special to The Inquirer (Correspondent Jan Hefler contributed to this article.)
Walter Weilenbeck, animal warden for 14 South Jersey towns, surrendered his license to operate an animal shelter yesterday, hours before the Pennsauken Board of Health was to consider revoking it because of numerous health violations at the shelter. Attorney Uri Taenzer spoke for Weilenbeck, who was not present at a board hearing last night, saying the warden and his family were "kind of sick and tired of all the press and publicity and innuendos and rumors that have flown back and forth" about Weilenbeck and the Garden State Humane Society pound that he operates off Mohican Trail in Pennsauken.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The proposed Gloucester County animal shelter is a project that has survived a court battle, three sets of bids and 20 years of on-again, off- again planning. Last night, in what Freeholder Director John R. Maier said was "a real milestone for the county," the freeholders unanimously approved a $663,000 contract to build the shelter in the Borough of Clayton. The contract was awarded to W.J. Gross Inc. of Clarksboro, the low bidder, to build a shelter on 2 1/2 acres of county-owned land off Delsea Drive.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
A zoning board's denial of a developer's application to construct a county animal shelter apparently has not discouraged the Gloucester County Board of Freeholders from continuing to pursue the proposal. During last night's meeting, the freeholders agreed to compare the cost of having the developer, Chester Ottinger of Bridgeton, build the complex with the cost of the county constructing the facility on its own land. His proposal has already been rejected by the Clayton zoning board.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
It took 20 years of on-again, off-again planning, a court battle, seven months of delays and, most recently, a name change, but the Gloucester County Animal Control Facility, as it is now called, is set to open tomorrow. Freeholder Director John R. Maier will cut a ribbon during a brief ceremony at the "animal shelter," as it was formerly known. The facility is behind the Gloucester County Highway Building on Delsea Drive in Clayton. Proposed in the 1960s, the new shelter was put aside while the county built other facilities, such as Gloucester County College in Deptford and the Gloucester County Criminal Justice Complex in Woodbury.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
The Southampton Township Committee has postponed a decision on the fate of a local animal shelter until Nov. 19. At that time, the committee is scheduled to decide whether or not to revoke the license of Steven Marshall, a resident who operates the Pet Farm - an animal shelter, petting zoo and pet shop. The Township Committee postponed the decision at a public hearing Wednesday when Mayor Robert L. Thompson was unable to attend due to illness. The hearing marked the end of a month-long series of five public hearings in which Marshall was called on to answer charges by the township that the Pet Farm is not operating in compliance with county and state health codes.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Steven J. Marshall says he has achieved what many animal lovers can only wish for. He owns three acres of woodsy land, a house and a menagerie that includes hundreds of cats, dogs, goats, horses and assorted other homeless critters. But his good fortune has turned. For almost a year, Marshall has been the target of officials who say his combination animal shelter, pet shop and petting zoo in Southampton Township, Burlington County, poses a health hazard and should be shut down.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Animal Shelter will receive about $122,680 from the estate of a Moorestown woman who apparently made the bequest out of her love for dogs, according to her attorney. Viola Morvek, a childless widow who died of natural causes in her Moorestown home May 17, left an estate valued at about $450,000, said attorney Janet Sozio. Morvek, who was 84, had outlived her poodle and cocker spaniel, Sozio said. "She had a soft spot in her heart for dogs and that's why I believe she made the gift to the animal shelter," said Sozio.
NEWS
September 24, 2009 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about news getting twisted until it loses the truth: No animals faced death yesterday because of the closing of a Montgomery County animal shelter. Apparently, a rumor has rushed around the Internet, via Facebook and Twitter, that such a tale of woe is playing out in Pennsylvania. Or is it Montgomery Township, N.J.? Actually, it's neither. A shelter is closing in Montgomery County, Texas, but don't worry about the animals; they've all been adopted. The Philadelphia area does have a Montgomery County SPCA, which has three shelters.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | By Marc Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
Philadelphia's oldest animal shelter, the Women's Humane Society, has received preliminary approval from the Bensalem Township Council to relocate to Richlieu Road. The council Wednesday voted, 4-0, with President Barbara Barnes absent due to illness, to grant land development consideration of the humane society's proposed $1.5 million to $2 million structure. A 23,000-square-foot building would house as many as 212 animals on an 11- acre plot next to the Pennsylvania Turnpike, King David Cemetery and the Youth Development Center, said John Foster, managing director of the nonprofit society.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Bonnie Baker, Special to The Inquirer
When David Kirby's lease to operate the Animal Care League animal shelter in Voorhees expired July 31, he seemed in a hurry to leave. The telephone lines had been cut. There was no food available to feed the nearly 100 caged dogs and cats left behind. No pet dishes either. That, at least, is the situation the new operators of the facility say they discovered Aug. 1, the day after Kirby locked the doors and closed down, temporarily at least, the largest and most heavily-used private animal shelter in Camden County.
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NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to dogs and cats, Camden has long had some of the strictest ordinances in the state, including one requiring all owners to spay or neuter their pets. In fact, until recently, Camden was the only municipality in New Jersey with such a mandate. This month, after city officials became aware the ordinance was more restrictive than state law, City Council voted to amend it. Now, the city no longer tickets pet owners who don't fix their dogs as long as those dogs are licensed.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erik Hendricks, 71, of Haverford, a former staff member and longtime executive director of the Pennsylvania SPCA, died Friday, Jan. 30, of leukemia at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Hendricks' tenure with the animal welfare group ran from 1976 to 2007, and he helped create and implement some of the signature programs and services the PSPCA offers. He also advocated at the state level for stricter laws to protect animals from cruelty and abuse. "We are proud to have had Erik as part of our history, and we honor his commitment to our lifesaving mission," said Jerry Buckley, CEO of the PSPCA.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Jessica is a helper. An energetic and personable 14-year-old, she volunteers at a nursing home, where she does "anything they need me to do," she says. "I really enjoy it, and I love helping people. " Her compassion extends to homeless pets. Jessica is so passionate about animals she dreams of having a career taking care of them. She'd like to volunteer at an animal shelter, particularly since her recent tour of one in Philadelphia, where she played with the puppies and handed out treats to all. Jessica is a talkative teen with bright hazel eyes and long dark hair, which she likes to wear in a ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Kiya is a sweet, humor-filled 11-year-old who loves animals, and whose favorite class in school is Pet Care (with gymnastics a close second). She delights in helping train dogs, and giving them treats when they obey. For the long term, Kiya dreams of a career as a veterinarian. In the more immediate future, though, she would like to learn more about the field by visiting an animal shelter. A fifth grader, Kiya does well in school, and her grades are continually improving. She looks forward to taking part in the school play each year.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Forget whether the water level in the Delaware River would be adequate for Gen. George Washington's reenactor to lead a crossing. Or if the great electricity gorge of a lavish holiday light display would plunge a house or a block into darkness. The greatest local suspense of Christmas came compliments of Philadelphia teacher Frieda George, 59, as she surveyed dogs in the Animal Care and Control Team (ACCT) Philadelphia shelter to find one to call her own. "This is a hard choice," said George, who was with son Michael, 15, and daughter Adrienne, 26, who came up for the holiday from St. Petersburg, Fla., where she is working on her doctorate in marine science.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDIA Delaware County said Monday that it had submitted the names of a lawyer, an accountant, a police chief, and a veterinarian to join the board of the beleaguered Chester County SPCA. The shelter accepts strays from Chester County as well as from most towns in Delaware County under a $30,000-a-month contract. The SPCA has been the target of criticism by current and former staff and volunteers over alleged mistreatment and ineffective management and concerns over rising euthanasia rates at its 84-year-old facility.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER In a major shake-up, the beleaguered Chester County SPCA, the target of criticism by current and former staff and volunteers, will soon add 11 board members, officials announced Monday. In a deal brokered between the SPCA and State Sen. Andrew Dinniman (D. Chester), the new members will be in place by the end of October and serve with the handful of remaining active board members. "This should make a significant difference," Dinniman said. The shelter has come under fire from former and current staff and volunteers, who attributed the center's problems - including a rise in euthanasia rates - to ineffective board leadership, board members who miss meetings, and unfilled senior management positions.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following reports of animal mistreatment and rising euthanasia numbers, a Chester County state senator and Delaware County councilman said Tuesday that they would look into conditions at the Chester County SPCA, a regional hub for stray dogs and cats. The center takes in about 5,000 strays annually from all of Chester County and, under a $30,000-a-month contract, most towns in Delaware County. Some SPCA volunteers and ex-staff members as well as a former board member say it has become a "kill factory.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is a regional hub for taking in stray dogs and cats, but the Chester County SPCA shelter has become a "kill factory," say SPCA volunteers, a former board member, and ex-staff members. They blame ineffective board leadership, unfilled senior management positions, and a clash of ideologies for a significant rise in euthanasia numbers. Though shelter management does not dispute that euthanasia numbers are rising, it says it is battling the realities of dealing with a tremendous volume of unwanted dogs and cats, many of whom are not adoptable.
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