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Animal Testing

NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Gracie Amber, 9 months old, has her own store. Well, not quite. But she usually spends her days at Gracie's Green Earth in West Chester in her parents' arms or in the fenced play area near the cash register. Before she was born, Robin and Pete Amber decided to work at something that could make a difference in her life. They opened a "green" store a few months ago on East Market Street - one of only 100 or so in the country feeding the demand for items that will soften man's effect on the Earth.
FOOD
September 28, 1988 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. When I was first married in the '40s, I read in a column such as yours that one leaf of leaf lettuce had far more value than a whole head of iceberg lettuce. I'm also aware that some things we took for gospel back then have been disproved. Could you fill me in with the facts? Mildred Heaton Richmond, Ind. A. Although iceberg lettuce is valuable for its fiber and its wonderful crunchiness in sandwiches, when it comes to vitamins and minerals it doesn't have much to offer.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 200 animal rights activists, many wearing pajamas and robes to dramatize their point, demonstrated yesterday against the use of cats in sleep-disorder research at the University of Pennsylvania. Holding aloft signs depicting cats and monkeys they said were disfigured in medical experiments, the protesters denounced animal research as needless and cruel. They called for an end to the work of Adrian R. Morrison, who heads the Laboratories of Anatomy at Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a dozen FBI agents raided the West Philadelphia home of an animal-rights activist yesterday in connection with a federal investigation of a harassment campaign against an animal-testing company. The focus of the raid appeared to be Nick Cooney, 23, a member of a group called Hugs for Puppies who has participated in protests against Huntingdon Life Sciences, a testing firm based near Princeton. The company has been the subject of an international campaign by animal-rights activists who say they want to put it out of business.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
For Anita Roddick, being at Akiba Hebrew Academy was reminiscent of her days as a history and English teacher in England. "Talking to the students here is so much more interesting than talking at a bloody business convention," Roddick said. "I usually speak at universities. This is the first time I have visited a middle school. " Roddick, 49, from England, started the Body Shop, an international company that sells natural cosmetics. She visited the school Tuesday to talk about her company and to receive the Compassion to Animals Award from the school's Animal Rights Club.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1995 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Human testing of the first DNA-based vaccine has begun in Philadelphia, researchers will announce today. The vaccine, being tested at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, is designed to delay, or even halt, the onset of AIDS in people infected with HIV, the virus that causes the deadly disease. DNA is the basic genetic building block of life. So far, just one patient has received the DNA-based vaccine, but doctors plan to expand that to 15. The patients will be placed in three groups of five, with each group getting a different dosage.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Lisa Schwartz, Special to The Inquirer
Masjid. Imam. Words that conjure up visions of a minaret or the Koran. These are words the Youth Fellowship group from the First Presbyterian Church in Haddonfield will learn about today when they visit a mosque in Philadelphia. A masjid is a mosque. An imam is a leader of prayer. In just a 30-minute trip from Haddonfield, the students will step back through hundreds of years of cultural and religious history and learn about the religion of Islam. Their trip is part of a month-long Youth Fellowship program on Iraq.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
His wife calls Raymond Crippen "a born chemist," and his resume is peppered with the names of prominent employers - Du Pont, Merrell National Laboratories of Cincinnati. Until he sold the business last year, he ran Crippen Laboratories, a New Castle soil and water analysis lab. It is, perhaps, an unlikely background for someone charged with consumer fraud. Delaware officials say Crippen touted his "Black Cleaner Capsules" as a cure for cancer, arthritis and drunkenness when there was no evidence that they could do more than soothe indigestion.
NEWS
March 2, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nick Cooney had to take a day off from his job as a teacher's aide in West Philadelphia so he could battle a team of corporate lawyers in Chester County Court. And, by all accounts, the 22-year-old did quite well for himself yesterday, garnering kudos from the judge, legal onlookers - even opposing counsel. Cooney was hauled into court by attorneys for Berwind Pharmaceutical Services Inc., who wanted a judge to order Cooney and his animal-rights compatriots to stay at least 100 feet from the chief executive officer's house when they protest the company's role in animal testing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first gene therapy in the Western Hemisphere will soon be available in Europe. The approval of Glybera by European regulators happened with little fanfare in September, in contrast to the hype that surrounded gene therapy 20 years ago. But it is truly a breakthrough for the field, for people with the ultrarare disease it treats - and for University of Pennsylvania scientist James M. Wilson, a creator of the modified virus that delivers the...
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