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Animal Welfare Act

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NEWS
June 4, 1986
The animal-rights community must now contend with the Reagan administration's allocation of zero funding for the enforcement of the "improved" Animal Welfare Act of 1985. After years of battling over the needed changes concerning the pathetic conditions and lack of humane procedures forced upon laboratory animals, we must now beg President Reagan to fund this piece of legislation. Evidence for need of such funding and better enforcement of the act continues to be exposed, e.g., Columbia University, University of California at Riverside, University of Pennsylvania, etc. It was not tax funded agencies that exposed these abuses, it was private individuals.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When a group of animal-welfare activists showed up for a demonstration outside the Buckshire Corp. facility Monday complaining of conditions there, it was the second such protest in six months. The last protest, in August, was followed by an inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that found enough alleged violations of the Animal Welfare Act to fill 13 pages. Although that report may have been the most critical Buckshire has received, it was not the first time the company, which supplies animals to laboratories for research purposes, had been faulted for treatment of animals.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | By David Rohde, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County petting zoo and farm that was briefly shut down last year by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for mistreating its animals has closed its pens for good. Quarry Valley Farm, which offered close contact with 200 traditional and nontraditional farm animals to an estimated 40,000 visitors a year, went out of business Dec. 1. The 48-acre farm in Lahaska, which also offered hayrides, reopened in April after making USDA-mandated improvements. "The USDA is absolutely ridiculous with its animal regulations," owner Sherry Jamison said.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER and GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writers
The National Institutes of Health yesterday lifted funding restrictions it imposed last November on new animal research projects at the University of Pennsylvania. Funding restrictions remain, however, on research involving baboons at Penn's controversial Head Injury Clinical Research Project. Penn indefinitely suspended that research last July, and university researchers have not sought NIH funds for it since. The NIH, which gets its money from federal tax dollars, suspended funding to the head-injury clinic last summer, citing poor care and unsanitary conditions.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
PENN BIOMEDICAL researchers are sick puppies. Or so say at least 10 animal-rights activists who were on the University of Pennsylvania campus yesterday protesting animal research there, after the school received a federal warning about conditions that led to the deaths of a puppy and three gerbils. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which enforces the Animal Welfare Act, issued the warning last month, after inspectors found that a newborn puppy died after getting trapped beneath a kennel floor grate and that three gerbils died apparently because of dehydration from "unsuitable sipper tubes.
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If this was a typical holiday season, the staff at the Quarry Valley Farm in Lahaska, Bucks County, would be in high gear - stringing lights and setting up a live Nativity scene for the scores of visitors expected in the next few weeks. But this is not a typical season for the 48-acre farm. Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture closed Quarry Valley for operating an unlicensed petting zoo, citing several violations of the Animal Welfare Act, such as inadequate shelter for some animals.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | By JULIA LAWLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Animal-rights activists have charged that University of Pennsylvania officials are planning a "cosmetic fixup" of animal laboratory facilities - all for the benefit of a federal inspection team set to arrive on campus Monday. Ten inspectors from the National Institutes of Health will make an unprecedented weeklong visit to ensure that federal guidelines are being met. Last year, NIH suspended funding to the Head Injury Clinical Research Center, citing poor care of animals and unsanitary conditions.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
Even zoo's supporters bristle at what it did with two giraffes For my money (of which it will get no more), patronizing the Cape May County Zoo is akin to condoning cruelty to animals. The Aug. 5 article "What kind of life do giraffes prefer?" - which detailed the fate of two male giraffes sold by zoo management to a New York animal broker - left me sickened. Jeffrey and Twiggs, now part of a "petting" exhibit that accompanies a traveling circus, were pronounced "jolly" by the zoo's director.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Though he has fought vigorously to lift government regulations on other businesses, Sen. Rick Santorum has found an industry that he believes needs a tighter leash: commercial pet breeding. Inspired by complaints from constituents, the Pennsylvania Republican is urging stricter standards for mass breeding facilities, commonly known as puppy mills. What made Santorum, who likes to cultivate a ferocious image, go warm and furry? He doesn't even own a dog. "It's not just animal welfare," he said of his rare pro-regulatory stance.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | BY CLEVELAND AMORY, From the New York Times
Ask an experimenter about the animals in his laboratory. Nine times out of 10 he will tell you that they are well cared for and that he abides by the Animal Welfare Act passed by Congress in 1966. What he will not say is that both he and his colleagues fought the act and the amendments to it every step of the way; that, under the act, his laboratory is inspected at most (if at all) once a year; that when his animals are under experimentation, the act doesn't apply. Nor will he say that many laboratories ignore the act's most important amendment, passed in 1986, which mandates that at least one member of the public vote on the laboratory's animal care committee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
PENN BIOMEDICAL researchers are sick puppies. Or so say at least 10 animal-rights activists who were on the University of Pennsylvania campus yesterday protesting animal research there, after the school received a federal warning about conditions that led to the deaths of a puppy and three gerbils. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which enforces the Animal Welfare Act, issued the warning last month, after inspectors found that a newborn puppy died after getting trapped beneath a kennel floor grate and that three gerbils died apparently because of dehydration from "unsuitable sipper tubes.
NEWS
October 14, 2005 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 9,000-pound elephant at the Philadelphia Zoo has been isolated indoors since she was hurt in August in a shoving match with an exhibit-mate and may be sent elsewhere if she can't get along with the zoo's three other elephants, zoo officials said yesterday. Dulary, 41, who is the zoo's only Asian elephant and has lived at the zoo almost her whole life, sustained a cut eyelid when she went head to head with Bette, an African elephant half her age and a full ton lighter. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, responding to complaints from local and national animal activists, conducted an investigation at the zoo this week and is expected to report its findings soon, an agency spokesman said.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
Even zoo's supporters bristle at what it did with two giraffes For my money (of which it will get no more), patronizing the Cape May County Zoo is akin to condoning cruelty to animals. The Aug. 5 article "What kind of life do giraffes prefer?" - which detailed the fate of two male giraffes sold by zoo management to a New York animal broker - left me sickened. Jeffrey and Twiggs, now part of a "petting" exhibit that accompanies a traveling circus, were pronounced "jolly" by the zoo's director.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Though he has fought vigorously to lift government regulations on other businesses, Sen. Rick Santorum has found an industry that he believes needs a tighter leash: commercial pet breeding. Inspired by complaints from constituents, the Pennsylvania Republican is urging stricter standards for mass breeding facilities, commonly known as puppy mills. What made Santorum, who likes to cultivate a ferocious image, go warm and furry? He doesn't even own a dog. "It's not just animal welfare," he said of his rare pro-regulatory stance.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When a group of animal-welfare activists showed up for a demonstration outside the Buckshire Corp. facility Monday complaining of conditions there, it was the second such protest in six months. The last protest, in August, was followed by an inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that found enough alleged violations of the Animal Welfare Act to fill 13 pages. Although that report may have been the most critical Buckshire has received, it was not the first time the company, which supplies animals to laboratories for research purposes, had been faulted for treatment of animals.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | By David Rohde, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County petting zoo and farm that was briefly shut down last year by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for mistreating its animals has closed its pens for good. Quarry Valley Farm, which offered close contact with 200 traditional and nontraditional farm animals to an estimated 40,000 visitors a year, went out of business Dec. 1. The 48-acre farm in Lahaska, which also offered hayrides, reopened in April after making USDA-mandated improvements. "The USDA is absolutely ridiculous with its animal regulations," owner Sherry Jamison said.
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If this was a typical holiday season, the staff at the Quarry Valley Farm in Lahaska, Bucks County, would be in high gear - stringing lights and setting up a live Nativity scene for the scores of visitors expected in the next few weeks. But this is not a typical season for the 48-acre farm. Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture closed Quarry Valley for operating an unlicensed petting zoo, citing several violations of the Animal Welfare Act, such as inadequate shelter for some animals.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | BY CLEVELAND AMORY, From the New York Times
Ask an experimenter about the animals in his laboratory. Nine times out of 10 he will tell you that they are well cared for and that he abides by the Animal Welfare Act passed by Congress in 1966. What he will not say is that both he and his colleagues fought the act and the amendments to it every step of the way; that, under the act, his laboratory is inspected at most (if at all) once a year; that when his animals are under experimentation, the act doesn't apply. Nor will he say that many laboratories ignore the act's most important amendment, passed in 1986, which mandates that at least one member of the public vote on the laboratory's animal care committee.
NEWS
August 13, 1988
NOT ENFORCING LAB ANIMAL ACT In 1985, Congress in a bi-partisan majority vote, passed the "Improved Standards for Laboratory Animals Act. " This law requires that any research facility doing experiments on animals follow basic humane guidelines for pre/post experimentation procedures, and where called for, that anestetics be given animals to relieve pain. With the recent findings by animal rights investigators of animal abuse and fraud in Philadelphia, it's yet another example of how little, if any, enforcement of this law is given by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
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