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Animal Welfare

NEWS
April 29, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania SPCA has ended a controversial practice of draining blood from dogs before they are killed for use in transfusions at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school hospital. The practice, which is performed on about 100 dogs a year at the SPCA's Philadelphia shelter, has been strongly criticized by animal-welfare activists, who say that such a practice is inappropriate for a society set up to prevent cruelty to animals. Dr. Donald Abt, associate dean of the Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, said that Erik Hendricks, the SPCA's executive director, called about noon yesterday to say that the practice was being suspended "for the time being.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether or not Michael Vick remains an Eagle, the team says it will continue to help the region's needy animals in the long term. The team adopted animal welfare as a cause in 2009 following the controversial signing of Vick after his release from federal prison. He was convicted of running an illegal dog fighting ring. "The commitment is continuing," an Eagles spokesman, Rob Zeiger, said last week. The team has donated roughly $400,000 of the animal welfare fund's $500,000 to about a dozen area charities, said Zeiger, adding that "when we run through that, we'll revisit where we go. " (Zeiger is no longer employed by the Eagles.)
SPORTS
November 27, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whether or not Michael Vick remains a Eagle, the team says it will continue to help the region's needy animals in the long term. The team adopted animal welfare as a cause in 2009 following the controversial signing of Vick after his release from federal prison. He was convicted of running an illegal dogfighting ring. "The commitment is continuing," an Eagles spokesman, Rob Zeiger, said last week. The team has donated roughly $400,000 of the animal welfare fund's $500,000 to about a dozen area charities, said Zeiger, adding that "when we run through that, we'll revisit where we go. " (Zeiger is no longer employed by the Eagles.)
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pamela Richards said she learned to respect animals while growing up in rural Manasquan Park in Monmouth County. Her menagerie of pets included dogs, rabbits, a skunk and a monkey. "It's a lifetime thing," the 42-year-old said of her love of animals. The animal-welfare advocate will soon work to better the lives of animals and humans throughout the state as a member of Gov. Whitman's Domestic Companion Animal Council. Created by law in June 1995, the 12-member group will monitor the state's animal-control program - the "spay and neuter" project funded in part by the "Animal Friendly" license plates.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A showdown vote is expected this week over the future of Pennsylvania's largest animal-welfare society. For the last year, animal-rights activists have skirmished in courtrooms and meeting halls with the leadership of the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals over the direction of the organization, the state's oldest and richest animal-welfare group. On Thursday and Friday, the society's members will vote on seven resolutions that both factions agree will do much to decide how the 121-year- old organization will be run. "This is the showdown," said Erik Hendricks, executive director of the organization, which is not related to the Women's SPCA of Pennsylvania, another animal-welfare society.
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
In Camden, a dog is set afire as a crowd watches. It is injured so badly its eyes are literally burned out of its head before an animal-welfare agent arrives and takes it off to be humanely destroyed. In Bucks County, a serial cat-killer stalks neighborhood pets. In Northeast Philadelphia, someone poisons stray cats living near an apartment complex. In North Philadelphia, a pit bull loses a fight and is hanged. Are these examples of a society entering an age of savagery?
NEWS
October 6, 2006 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Asserting that the state Department of Agriculture has failed to stop the spread of large-scale dog breeding operations in Pennsylvania, an animal-welfare group yesterday urged Gov. Rendell to create an independent commission to crack down on inhumane conditions that exist in so-called "puppy mills. " United Against Puppy Mills, based in Lancaster County, which has the highest concentration of commercial breeders, presented Rendell a petition containing more than 33,500 signatures of Pennsylvania residents and asked him to remove the Bureau of Dog Law from the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
August 20, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A state panel voted, 3-1, Thursday to give final approval to regulations that will provide the first standards for temperature, ventilation, humidity, and lighting in Pennsylvania's commercial dog kennels. "Approval of these regulations now means there is no doubt about what breeders who own commercial kennels need to do to comply with the law, which raises the standard of care for dogs in commercial kennels even higher," said Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding. The provisions, developed by the Canine Health Board as part of the 2008 dog law, are expected to be finalized by October but will not take effect until July, the agency said, because renovations are necessary for some kennels.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) yesterday lifted an eight-month ban on funding of animal-releated research at the University of Pennsylvania, acknowledging that Penn had substantially improved its animal-welfare programs. The NIH, however, said it would continue a ban on federal funding of research using baboons in Penn's controversial Head Injury Clinical Research Project at Penn's School of Medicine. Penn suspended that research in July and has not begun it again, nor has the university sought federal funding.
NEWS
October 10, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer staff writer Dwight Ott contributed to this article
The picture shows three garbage cans filled with dead cats and dogs. Above it are the words: "Does Freeholder Riletta Cream care about this?" Compassion for Camden has printed up hundreds of these fliers asking voters to cast their ballots this November against Cream, who has served on the board since January 1995. The fliers, which the nonprofit organization's director began handing out last weekend, are part of a campaign to defeat two incumbent freeholders - Cream and Bernie Platt - whom animal rights activists perceive as unconcerned about animal welfare.
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