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Animal Welfare

SPORTS
October 13, 2012 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day after declining to say whether he owned a dog, Michael Vick released a statement Thursday confirming that his family had obtained one. "I understand the strong emotions by some people about our family's decision to care for a pet," the Eagles quarterback said in a statement released by his publicist. "As a father, it is important to make sure my children develop a healthy relationship with animals. "I want to ensure that my children establish a loving bond and treat all of God's creatures with kindness and respect.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | By Virginia S. Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
E.T. Jr., a droopy-eared beagle who turned 4 months old Friday, hasn't a clue that he's Pottsville's most famous pooch. His mug was in the local paper. His tale was on television. And he spent three hours recently in court, where he was the center of attention and where, in all that time, he whimpered only once to go out. "He was as good as gold," said Theda Hoptak, a department-store employee who started E.T. Jr. on his path to stardom in August by giving her 9-year-old daughter, Jessica, $1 to buy a chance at the Schuylkill County fair.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
Mmm, mmm good. That's the word coming out of the Pennsylvania SPCA about its just-hired CEO, Jerry Buckley, formerly a top PR exec at Campbell Soup Company who opened his career with strong journalism credentials — 11 years as a correspondent for Newsweek followed by eight years as a senior editor at U.S. News & World Report. The 56-year-old Buckley is the fourth CEO to head the animal welfare agency since 2007, and churn is a bad ingredient when you're trying to cook up an effective organization, one that has received some withering criticism in recent years.
NEWS
March 24, 1988
'STAR WARS' CAN ONLY ENHANCE ARMS RACE On March 1, The Inquirer reported on a Pentagon briefing about last month's "Star Wars" space experiment. The point of the briefing was to convince the public that a Star Wars defense is feasible. Apparently, the government spent $250 million to see if it could determine the differences among 14 mock warheads and decoys that it put into space. The test was considered a success because our sensors could distinguish between light-weight, cheap decoys and the heavier warheads.
NEWS
February 20, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The short and controversial reign of Howard Nelson, chief executive of the Pennsylvania SPCA, officially came to an end yesterday. In a unanimous vote, the 14-person PSPCA board accepted Nelson's resignation, effective immediately. Nelson, 45, formerly head of the Washington Humane Society, joined PSPCA in March 2007. His departure came exactly one week after he shocked the board with his sudden decision to resign, citing health reasons and "an environment no longer conducive to my success or the success of the organization.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
To some theologians it is a shocking example of man's desire to play God. To some farmers it represents a threat to the family farm. To many animal- welfare activists it could mean greater suffering for animals. But to agricultural scientists and business people it represents an important step forward in the development of new kinds of livestock that might someday include chickens that lay cholesterol-free eggs and cows that produce insulin and other drugs in their milk. They are talking about a decision by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this year to begin issuing patents for new forms of life: genetically altered animals.
NEWS
May 17, 1988
The 50th Dad Vail Regatta held this past weekend was, by all accounts, a tremendous success. But it left behind a landscape strewn with trash - cans and bottles spread as far as the eye could see. A panoply of paper debris. It looked like Animal House II had been staged there (or was perhaps still being filmed). At present, Fairmount Park groundskeepers have to bear the whole clean-up task, and they are still at half strength because the summer workers haven't started. An agglomeration of debris such as accumulated this weekend is clearly beyond the capacity of this fiscally strapped agency, which has trouble keeping its grass mown and trees trimmed in the best of times.
NEWS
February 13, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Howard Nelson, chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania SPCA since March 2007, yesterday began an abrupt leave of absence. Nelson had resigned late Wednesday in an e-mail to PSPCA's 14-person board, but was persuaded to take an unspecified leave, said Kevin Feeley, a spokesman for the board. Nelson is said to have a solid relationship with the board. His resignation "came out of the blue. I was flabbergasted," Feeley said. "It is with deep sadness due to health reasons and an environment no longer conducive to my success or the success of the organization that I am forced to resign my position from the PSPCA," Nelson wrote.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | Russell Cooke
With Congress launching debate on a new farm bill, there's no better time for Pennsylvania's congressional delegation to bring some sizzle to a major reform affecting one of the state's biggest farming sectors. As the nation's third-largest egg producer, Pennsylvania has a major stake in a proposal introduced last week in the Senate — and already gathering sponsors in the House — that would improve living conditions for egg-laying chickens. Following the lead of several states, the federal push to gradually shift all U.S. farms to larger cages for more than 250 million hens crammed into spaces so tight they can't spread a wing has been getting bipartisan backing.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
TO THIS CITY'S funeral homes and cemeteries: You should all be ashamed of yourselves! It is a disgrace that not one funeral home or cemetery has come forward and offered to help bury the young mother and her three children who were run down and killed on Roosevelt Boulevard last week. And this goes for the big businesses in this city, too. Would it have hurt any of you individually or as a group to come together and donate caskets, funeral services and a cemetery plot to help this family in such a tragedy?
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