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Animal Welfare

NEWS
October 17, 2008 | By Vernon Clark and Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An audit by the City Controller's Office has found an array of problems at the Philadelphia Animal Care and Control Association, ranging from premature euthanizing of dogs and cats to insufficient record-keeping. The nonprofit, at 111 W. Hunting Park Ave., handles dogs, cats and other animals that are turned in as strays in Philadelphia. The agency has received more than $16 million over the last six years from the city with the expectation it would provide animal welfare, officials said.
NEWS
May 4, 2008 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veterinary student from Bala Cynwyd has received a $100,000 inspiration award that will allow her to do postgraduate work in farm-animal welfare. Rachel Toaff-Rosenstein, 26, a fourth-year student at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, was presented with a Penn Vet Student Inspiration Award on Tuesday during ceremonies in Philadelphia. She and another student - Warren Waybright, of Gettysburg, Pa. - were picked from among 21 applicants, said Alan M. Kelly, the school's dean emeritus, who chaired the selection panel.
NEWS
October 6, 2006 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Asserting that the state Department of Agriculture has failed to stop the spread of large-scale dog breeding operations in Pennsylvania, an animal-welfare group yesterday urged Gov. Rendell to create an independent commission to crack down on inhumane conditions that exist in so-called "puppy mills. " United Against Puppy Mills, based in Lancaster County, which has the highest concentration of commercial breeders, presented Rendell a petition containing more than 33,500 signatures of Pennsylvania residents and asked him to remove the Bureau of Dog Law from the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
Reporting of shooting victims is not equitable Page B1 of the Jan. 16 Inquirer had an article headlined "Penn student, 2 others shot. " At the bottom of page B8 were these headlines: "Gunman wounds 3 people at Southwest Phila. dance" and "Two men killed in shootings in Wynnefield and S. Phila. " It is tragic that a University of Pennsylvania student was wounded by gunfire; it is tragic that there were other handgun-related injuries and deaths. Yet the story of the wounded student was headlined on page B1 and the others were relegated to the bottom of page B8. Shouldn't the reporting of all gun violence victims be equitable, or are some victims considered less "newsworthy" due to issues of race and class?
NEWS
June 21, 2005 | By Lee Hall
These days, activists talk tough. Agitators across the political spectrum seem oddly willing, since 2001, to accept the notion that ideology wins by force. Just last month, vandals visited a flower nursery in Richlandtown, Bucks County. The flower grower had applied for permission to build a kennel to store monkeys before they would be shipped to laboratories. The vandals smashed rare Chinese tree peonies, damaged cars, and spray-painted obscenities and the Animal Liberation Front acronym on greenhouses.
NEWS
May 11, 2005
IN SHERMON Kerr's vegetarian society ("The veal deal," May 3), he quotes as fact a wide variety of incorrect information apparently from a New York-based animal-rights group. This group disguises itself as an animal-welfare group, but in reality it is a radical animal activist group that believes any tactic is worth it for its stated agenda of a meat-free world. All you have to do to discover this group's true agenda is to listen to their own founder's quotes. Discussing the dairy industry in a January 1997 Vegetarian Times article, Gene Bauston made the stunning statement that "there is implicitly no humane milk.
NEWS
February 5, 2005 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A national expert on the humane treatment of animals told a town meeting in City Hall yesterday that within a few years, Philadelphia could have a workable "no kill" program for abandoned dogs and cats, if the right steps were taken. Nathan J. Winograd, head of No Kill Solutions, a San Diego firm brought in to survey the city's animal program after several Philadelphia Daily News stories criticized how it was being run by the Philadelphia Animal Care and Control Association (PACCA)
NEWS
February 4, 2005 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the East Harlem animal shelter, barking dogs and the occasional quacking duck create a beastly babble that almost drowns out Ed Boks as he dreams aloud that one day most of the shelter's 400 cages will be empty. His vision that New York will find homes for the 20,000-plus cats and dogs it otherwise would euthanize each year is part of a burgeoning national "no-kill" movement - one that Philadelphia also hopes to join. "It's our society's dirty little secret," Boks, a former minister and fan of St. Francis of Assisi, called the large numbers of euthanized pets.
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took some prodding by handlers yesterday to move the two dozen tigers from their cramped quarters to portable cages to begin their trip from a private refuge in central New Jersey to their new home in Texas. And it made some of the animals hostile and aggressive. Carol Asvestas urged the beasts that she had come to rescue to settle down. She promised them that they would like Texas. Everything - including their new enclosures - will be bigger, she said. "It is criminal to keep these animals in these conditions," she said outside the Tigers Only Preservation Society grounds.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wild animals accustomed to lots of room to roam don't do well confined in zoos, according to a new study in the journal Nature. Certain species, such as lions and polar bears, suffer physical and mental stress and high infant mortality in captivity. The study could influence the way zoos house animals or even whether they keep some species at all. Many zoologists have observed abnormal behavior in wide-ranging carnivores confined in zoos, said David Shepherdson, a researcher at the Oregon Zoo who is examining the origins of such behavior among polar bears at a number of U.S. zoos, including Philadelphia's.
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