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Animals

NEWS
October 14, 2009
CALL ME crazy, but it seems as though ever since Michael Vick came come to town, there are more and more cases of animal abuse. I cry myself to sleep at night watching the news. From Sticky the cat who was duct-taped to the pig of a human being who let her animals waste away in her home to the person who lit the tiny kitty on fire, I am just sick. Man is ruining the life of domesticated animals. They put so much trust in us to take care of them. And what does Philadelphia do?
NEWS
November 4, 2009
RE C.M. PARNS' recent letter on the alleged worthlessness of animals: A dog or cat or any animal is helpless. The strays on the streets are cold, alone and hungry. Looking for someone to be kind to them. They are alone without love. If they get hurt, they cannot tell anyone or ask for help. A homeless person can go to a shelter and get clothes, food, a warm bed. A person can walk and talk. If they get hurt, they can go to a hospital. Animals may not pay taxes, but a homeless person doesn't pay taxes, either!
NEWS
October 8, 2009
I'M SICK TO MY stomach again to see that another defenseless animal has been killed by a bunch of hoodlums. The kitten probably went up to them for love - and they set the poor thing on fire and threw rocks at it. Last week, we had Sticky the cat, and then the bus driver throwing the kittens out on the road. Maybe if people would stop letting their animals out to procreate or throwing them out, we wouldn't have this problem. Look at Cuddles' face - how could a person with a conscience do anything but love that kitten?
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | By Jim Detjen and Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
Employees at a Bucks County firm that supplies dogs to laboratories in Philadelphia and several Northeastern states have routinely beaten and abused animals at the company's kennel, a national animal-rights organization said yesterday. Ingrid Newkirk, national director of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, said in a telephone interview that a member of the group had witnessed more than 240 violations of state and federal animal-protection laws while working undercover at Quaker Farm Kennels in Quakertown for four months earlier this year.
NEWS
February 18, 2010
TO THE coward who set Rudy the dog on fire and then burned him with cigarettes: I lay in bed asking myself why things like this happen to defenseless animals - it's because they are defenseless and only cowards do these things. I often wonder why people like you get animals in the first place. He was a puppy who needed training. Maybe you should've thought about the responsibility that comes with a puppy before you bought him. I wish you never have a moment's peace, and hope you get everything that's coming to you!
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Toni and Richard Ruiz of Turnersville went to the Gloucester County Animal Control Center in Clayton last Wednesday to find a puppy for their 19-month- old son Michael. Toni Ruiz said her childhood dog had been a loyal playmate and had taught her a lot about responsibility. She wanted her son to have the same opportunity. When the blond toddler awoke from his afternoon nap on his father's shoulder, Michael didn't take his eyes off the black puppy his parents had picked. The Labrador mix even sat quietly as Michael accidentally put the dog in a headlock while trying to give it a hug. "By next week, when the boy goes into the bathtub, the puppy will want to jump in with him," said Mike Lowe, a senior field representative at the center.
NEWS
January 29, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Friendly, winsome and caring, Jessica, 12, easily warms up when meeting new people and thrives on adult approval and affection. She loves being the center of attention. Jessica adores animals and is very nurturing toward them, and likes singing, dancing and outdoor activities. Enrolled in the seventh grade, Jessica receives special education services. Her teachers report that she is very patient and motivated, although she struggles at times with concentration and retention. Art is her favorite subject.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Human beings may carol " 'tis the season to be jolly" this month, but this can be a dismal, even dangerous time for pets. Shopping for gifts and partying probably already are disrupting normal routines. Perhaps the worst trial for pets is being ignored while we celebrate Christmas, Hanukah and the New Year. Love, attention, walks with their owners, conversation or just cuddling are as important as food to the well-being of our animals. Harried by our increased activities, we just shove a plate of pet food at the animals whenever it's convenient, rather than adhering to their regular schedules.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
When Woodbury police found a duck with an arrow through its head swimming on a pond last year, they called Agatha Abruzzo. Abruzzo helped patch up the duck and prolong its life for seven months. When a pregnant deer was found tangled in a fence with no way out, police called Agatha Abruzzo. Together with a veterinarian, Abruzzo saw that the deer got out with just a few scratches. She later saw hoof prints from smaller deer, believed to be the doe's fawns, in the woods where she was released.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
With the midday sun beating down on his tricorn hat, Jim Nichols, 27, heaves rocks into a wheelbarrow. Nichols, in 18th-century linen breeches, shirt and vest, is restoring a barnyard wall at the Colonial Plantation, a "Living History Farm" at Ridley Creek State Park in Edgmont, Delaware County. Nichols, director of the farm, surveys the 118-acre domain with satisfaction. Down in the pigsty, five hungry piglets suckle from their fiercely protective mother. In the field, dark-brown Belgian mares graze leisurely.
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