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NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The first time Kaz met John Wayne, he was an 18-year-old immigrant fresh from Iran, standing in the lobby of the Barclay Hotel angling for a job. "Ah," Kaz said, spotting his childhood hero at the bar of the ritzy Rittenhouse Square hotel. "Here is the Duke. " Kazem Nabavi has never been a shy man. I met him in September after inquiring after the pony he keeps in a cozy paddock behind his tire shop in Port Richmond. We talked for hours. Completely charmed, I wrote about Kaz and his animals.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
SUZIE AND DAISY, both pit bulls, are lucky to be alive after nearly being killed by their owners who were fined and barred from owning animals for 90 days following hearing in Municipal Court yesterday. In his East Falls home, Kevin Spence, 56, kept Suzie in a collar so tight that authorities said "her skin had begun to grow around" it. The Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals charged Spence with animal neglect in August, took custody of Suzie, treated her wounds, and have since found her a new home.
SPORTS
October 23, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
MANY TIMES, usually at the end of practices, Jahlil Okafor will playfully palm the head of someone in the 76ers organization as the players gather for some words from coach Brett Brown before they head to the foul line to get in their final work of the day. Because his hands are so enormous, his grip usually encompasses pretty much the whole head, no matter who it is. Okafor is every bit of a man-child. The man part is obvious, from his hulking 6-11, 270-pound physique and booming voice, which sounds as though it is being electronically enhanced, like someone who wants to remain anonymous in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Like George Orwell in 1945, we live in a democracy tarnished by political intolerance. No English publisher wanted to issue Animal Farm in 1944, in large part because of how it depicted the (then-ally) Soviet Union. Today, people face public shame, lose jobs or businesses, or endure ostracism because of how they vote, what they hang on their walls, what attitudes they express on blogs, whom they've given money to, or whether they clap sincerely enough at an awards banquet. Despite Orwell's intent to satirize, decade by decade, each stage in Russia's history from 1917 to 1945, Animal Farm prevailed on a longer timeline because it conveyed the emergence of dictatorship and control from noble origins that sought equality and freedom.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A rooster named Fancy announces my arrival - or at least I'd like to think so - just as Jessica Lange, a pretty little barn kitty, runs up and welcomes me to Rancho Relaxo. This quirky Salem County animal sanctuary's other residents quickly make themselves known as well, including Cale, a goat who introduces himself to me with a head butt. And then a mini-donkey with a mocha coat as soft as a cloud ambles right up to the fence for a cuddle. What a sweetheart! "This is Pepito," says Caitlin Stewart, who established Rancho Relaxo on a modest 19th-century farm she purchased in 2012.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I'M OBSESSED these days with Philly stories about how one person's lone decision, made in a moment of compassion, can change lives. Take Anne Mahlum. In her teens, she started running to deal with the stress of living in a household beset by addiction. Running gave her clarity and strength. One day in 2007, she was on a jog through Center City, wondering what her life's purpose was. When she ran past a group of homeless men outside a shelter, she realized it was time to stop running past the men and start running with them.
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County freeholders voted unanimously Thursday to prohibit pet stores from selling animals from puppy mills. Called Norman's Law after the Labrador retriever mix Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash adopted from a shelter, the measure calls for shops to sell dogs and cats obtained from animal shelters and rescues. "As we said last week, we are going to stand up for animals of this county and ensure no one is profiting off of the inhumane treatment of puppy mills," said Nash, sponsor of the resolution.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden County Freeholders announced Thursday that they intend to introduce and vote on a resolution that would prohibit pet stores from selling animals obtained from so-called puppy and kitten mills. Instead, the shops would have to get their dogs and cats from animal shelters or rescues. Freeholder Jeff Nash, sponsor of the resolution, said he is confident it will pass when voted on next Thursday. The resolution is named Norman's Law after Nash's Labrador retriever mix, which he adopted from a shelter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IT WAS NOT ONLY a slow weekend on the celebrity non-news front, it was a slow weekend at the box office. Summer blockbusters gave way to niche films over a sleepy Labor Day weekend, with notable performances from the faith-based "War Room" and the Spanish language cartoon "Un Gallo con Muchos Huevos. " "War Room" fought its way to first place in its second weekend in release, earning $12.6 million across the four-day holiday weekend, according to Rentrak estimates on yesterday.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware Valley University, which introduced a pet-friendly residence hall last year, is expanding the program this year. The university earned national recognition for its animal friendliness when it began allowing students living on the second floor of Samuel Hall on its Doylestown campus to have approved pets in their rooms. Three chinchillas, two cats, three geckos, three snakes, two rabbits, and five hamsters and gerbils shared the hall with their 18 human owners. This year, 40 students will have pets at Samuel and South Halls, said spokeswoman Annmarie Ely. Cats are flagged this year.
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