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Anita Hill

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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anita Hill, whose ordeal prompted women around the country to fume, "Men just don't get it," came to the University of Pennsylvania yesterday to talk about an issue she said would affect half of all women in their lifetimes. Sexual harassment. About 1,700 people lined up for blocks to get into Irvine Auditorium to hear the soft-spoken law professor from the University of Oklahoma. Several hundred more filled Meyerson Hall to watch her on closed-circuit TV. Many more were turned away earlier in what Penn officials said was unprecedented interest in a speaker.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this report
She was introduced as "our Supreme Court justice. " But this speaker was not Sandra Day O'Connor, the only woman ever to sit on the nation's highest court. Rather, feminist leader Gloria Steinem bestowed the honorary title on Anita Hill, the Oklahoma law professor who shook the country last year with allegations of sexual harassment against Clarence Thomas, who was then a Supreme Court nominee. With Thomas now on the court, Hill has hardly faded into obscurity. More than 2,100 people cheered her Saturday at a conference on sexual harassment in New York.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Timothy Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
Two months after the Clarence Thomas hearings, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter had to defend his grilling of Anita Hill to constituents in West Chester on Tuesday. Taking questions in an auditorium crowded by more than 250 people at West Chester University, the Pennsylvania Republican was asked by one woman if his "brutal questioning of Anita Hill was a reflection of your own feeling. " Her question brought shouts and applause, and some people raised their hands to show they agreed.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | BY JESSE L. JACKSON
After Clarence Thomas took his place on the Supreme Court, Washington insiders thought they were finally rid of Anita Hill. When she first made her accusations against Thomas as nominee, the all-white, all-male Senate Judiciary Committee ignored her. Women across the country demanded she be heard. So the men in the White House plotted with the Republican senators to assassinate her character. They assailed her motives, her memory, her veracity. The Republican hit man, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter, accused her of perjury, while accepting the word of Thomas who, incredibly, swore that he had never, ever discussed anything with anyone about Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision favoring women's right to abortion.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | By Doreen Carvajal, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Where'd she come from, anyway?" "Who's her mama?" Even now, a year after the hearings and the outcry that made the 1992 calendar practically an astrological sign to women, the name Anita Hill provokes debate about race and sex that is as fresh as today's headlines. Those memories of Hill and Clarence Thomas and the Senate Judiciary Committee can still draw rage from best-selling novelist Toni Morrison, author of Jazz. She was so repulsed that she commissioned and collected 18 essays about the topic and then took the newly published book and many of the essayists on the road.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | BY MARY LEE SETTLE, From the New York Times
Thirty years ago a man came to my house. The man was drunk. He broke china by throwing it against the wall. He hit me. He threatened to keep on beating me. He then raped me. I was six miles out in the country alone. I had no option but to submit. He was stronger than I was in only one way. Physically. This was not a stranger, a thief, a Willy Horton. It was the husband of a friend of mine, a man known for his politeness, his good manners, his "genteel" way of life.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
My gut says Anita Hill told the truth. Upon returning to Oklahoma where she was warmly greeted by friends and supporters, she offered the bottom line: "I had nothing to gain by subjecting myself to the process," she said. "In fact, I had more to gain by remaining silent. " And silent she was - except for confiding in a handful of friends and professional associates - for 10 years. Hill's detractors have demanded to know why she waited, hanging the bloody scalpels with which they savaged her reputation on the hook of her Decade of Silence.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Where, demand the professional Pecksniffs, are the feminists on the Paula Jones case? Lance Morrow inquires in Time magazine: "Is it fair that American feminists are handling Paula Jones with rubber gloves and tongs at the end of a 10-foot pole, in contrast to their performance when they embraced Anita Hill and demanded justice for her regarding charges against Clarence Thomas that were less serious than the squalid scene retailed by Paula Jones?"...
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
Like millions of other Americans I was shocked and appalled (mildly, anyway) when the U.S. Senate confirmed Judge Clarence Thomas to be a justice of the Supreme Court. What may have set me somewhat apart from most of the others who shared that reaction is the fact that I had been a supporter of Judge Thomas' nomination up until very recently. And, truth to tell, I found myself rooting for him, just a little, as the Senate roll call began Tuesday night, even as I watched my own personal chances for riches vanish.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | By Wanda Motley and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Though he believes he has neutralized much criticism over his questioning of Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings last October, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter continues to be besieged. Yesterday, it was NBC's Today show, during which Hill, in a taped interview, said Specter's public comments about the hearings and what he learned from them show he has not learned enough. Hill's television interview aired on a day Specter had just one public event and Yeakel spent time taping television commercials and campaigning in central Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The piece hung over the sofa in Arlen Specter's Capitol office: Framed replicas of the failed U.S. Senate resolution to impeach Bill Clinton, personally signed by all 100 senator/jurors, the House members who prosecuted the case, and members of Clinton's defense team. The meticulous U.S. senator was proud that he had created such a historically significant document, but something nagged at him: "There's one signature we don't have," he told his chief of staff, David Urban. Bill Clinton's.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2011 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hear the name Anita Hill and you think of a young law professor telling the Senate Judiciary Committee that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her at work. Twenty years later, Hill has shifted her focus away from the office in a new book that looks at the connection between home and equality. "Home is not just a place, it's also a state of being," Hill explains. In Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding Home (Beacon Press, $25.95)
NEWS
October 28, 2011
AS ICONIC 60-Minute Man Chuck Bednarik would say, the guy who knows what's on the other side of the field has a distinct advantage over the guy who stays in his own zone. It helps you to neutralize or - as in the case of Frank Gifford - horizontal-ize the enemy. It's the same with politics; putting yourself in the opposition's shoes is a masterful strategy, one that the great Vince Lombardi would have cheered. And I have to say that last week the game ball went to the liberals, who displayed an amazing ability to call out and criticize the most radical, dangerous members of their squad.
NEWS
January 5, 2011
AS THE U.S. SENATE gavels in a new session today, it'll be the first in 30 years without Arlen Specter. It seems a good day to share some favorite Specter memories. This isn't about his legacy or unparalleled ability to be different things (Darlin' or Snarlin') to different people at different times. This is about, from a journalistic view, the joy of covering much of his career. From "borking" Bork to harassing Hill to his "not proven" vote on Clinton's impeachment, Arlen almost always managed to provide entertaining copy.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Virginia Thomas might have wanted to leave behind the spectacle of her husband Clarence's 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings, since they aired so much dirty laundry, movies, and soda cans. After all, he was confirmed. But no. This month, Thomas left a message requesting contrition from Anita Hill, whom her husband labeled "my most traitorous adversary. " "I would love you to consider an apology sometime and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband," Virginia Thomas said on a tape recording to Hill, her husband's former aide and now a Brandeis University professor.
NEWS
October 21, 2010
NO WONDER Anita Hill thought it was a prank. The weird, if not creepy, voice-mail message came in at 7:30 on a recent Saturday morning at her office at Brandeis University, where she is a law professor. A woman who identified herself as "Ginny Thomas" was asking Hill to apologize for her 1991 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. Hill turned the voice mail over to the FBI. How it got to ABC News and then to the world on Tuesday isn't known, but here's what is: Lots of people were talking yesterday about a 19-year-old case that had rarely returned to the news since then.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010
WHAT WAS she thinking? Why would Justice Clarence Thomas ' wife reach out to Anita Hill to ask for an apology after all these years? Unless this was a clever publicity stunt, Virginia Thomas is one disturbed cookie to dredge that up now. The dramatic confirmation hearings during which Hill accused Thomas of sexually harassing her when she was his aide happened a long time ago. In the end, Thomas prevailed. He got his lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court and Hill was all but sidelined to a life of obscurity.
NEWS
June 13, 2010 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
'In this season of discontent, it will be women who can transform the national rage and demoralization into hope. " Sounds like a potential campaign slogan for Meg Whitman, the newly anointed Republican gubernatorial candidate in California. Or Carly Fiorina, now the Golden State's GOP Senate candidate. Or Nikki Haley, who won the most votes in South Carolina's Republican primary for governor. Actually, it's a line from a column written for this page by Patricia Ireland, president of the National Organization for Women.
NEWS
December 22, 2009
ARLEN SPECTER is the most shameful and shameless politician in the Philadelphia area. It is outrageous and disingenuous that he would write an editorial opposing the escalation of the war in Afghanistan when he consistently supported the Bush administration's war of occupancy in Iraq. What nerve! As a former Pennsylvanian and longtime Democrat, I only wish I could vote for Joe Sestak, who is a true Democrat and genuine American hero. Arlen Specter never was and never will be a Democrat - he is simply a Bushite in opportunistic clothing.
NEWS
November 13, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lynn Yeakel, the feminist hero who as the Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate in 1992 nearly defeated incumbent Arlen Specter, yesterday endorsed a candidate to finish the job. Yeakel backed U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak in his bid to deny the Democratic nomination to Specter, who was a Republican when she tangled with him in a bitter campaign nearly 18 years ago. "Joe can be counted on to stand up for what he believes," Yeakel said during a...
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