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Anke Huber

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SPORTS
January 28, 1996 | By Andrea Leand, FOR THE INQUIRER
Holding the trophy over her head and wiping tears from her cheeks, Monica Seles celebrated her first Grand Slam title since being stabbed nearly three years ago. Having spent as much time in the training room as she has on court this fortnight, Monica Seles put the strains and stresses of her injuries out of her mind to cruise by eighth seed Anke Huber, 6-4, 6-1, Saturday morning and capture her fourth Australian Open crown. The reigning queen, whose fitness has been as much an issue this week as her tennis, intends to develop a new conditioning regimen after finishing her winter tournament schedule in Tokyo next week.
SPORTS
November 7, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first-round pairings for the Advanta Championships, a $450,000 WTA tour stop held at Villanova's Pavilion, were drawn yesterday with a bit of good luck for local favorite Lisa Raymond. Raymond will open the tournament, which begins Monday and will feature two sessions a day until Sunday's final, against a survivor of the qualifying. "I can't complain," said the 25-year-old Raymond, the native of Wayne who is ranked 25th in the world. "Any time you can start off against a qualifier, it's an advantage.
SPORTS
November 20, 1995 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the end, after 2 hours, 46 minutes, the tears mixed with the giggles, and Steffi Graf put her arm around Anke Huber, and Huber put her arm around Graf, but you couldn't tell - who was holding up whom? In only the seventh five-set women's final in tennis history, Graf had beaten Huber, 6-1, 2-6, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3, in the WTA Championships at Madison Square Garden. The 15,137 fans had been drawn to their feet dozens of times, mostly by heroics by Huber, and they had been gasping for breath more often than either of the women, who had been swinging from their heels.
SPORTS
September 5, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Recovering from the shock and pain of a public stabbing would give any person a different perspective on life. When that victim is a sports celebrity like Monica Seles, her counsel can have a lasting, soothing effect on people. Before Monica Seles walked onto the Louis Armstrong Stadium Court yesterday for her round of 16 match with Anke Huber, she noticed Edit Pakay, a junior girls player in the locker room who had just lost a match. "I talked to this one girl that was crying," Seles said after winning, 6-1, 6-4. "She was from Hungary.
SPORTS
November 11, 1995 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The idea came to Lori McNeil slowly, during the first set, when Conchita Martinez was stationed at the baseline, teeing off on passing shots and leaving McNeil bewildered. Hit short balls, McNeil finally decided. Make her run forward. See if Martinez could pass her on low, skidding balls up near the net. Martinez couldn't. And so Martinez, the No. 2 seed in the $800,000 Advanta Championships and a champion in Philadelphia two years ago, broke a toenail with all that running forward.
SPORTS
August 19, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Looking vulnerable for the first time, Monica Seles continued her comeback to tournament tennis after nearly 2 1/2 years last night, reaching the semifinals of the Canadian Open in Toronto with a 6-3, 6-2 victory over No. 7 Anke Huber. After two easy victories against Kimberly Po and Nathalie Tauziat, Seles ran into some problems with Huber, her first top 10 opponent. "I had to work for every point," Seles said. She was broken twice at the start of the match, her first service breaks of the tournament.
SPORTS
August 29, 1990 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the ball boys and ball girls were older than Jennifer Capriati and Anke Huber, the two giggly teenagers who could still be playing junior tennis but instead did battle in last night's featured match on the Louis Armstrong Stadium court at the U.S. Open. Capriati, a 14-year-old with a 33-8 professional record and a No. 13 seeding in her first Open, righted herself after a shaky spell and beat the 15-year-old Huber, 7-5, 7-5. Perhaps both youngsters will live up to the high expectations they have prompted with their precocious play.
SPORTS
November 14, 1994 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ball was always deep into the corners, dusting the edges of the lines. And Anke Huber always grunted, a deep sound from her toes at the beginning that turned into a mousy squeak by the time her racket swung through the ball. For 2 hours, 8 minutes, Huber was the metronome. Rhythmic grunt. The twang of her racket hitting the ball, pushing Mary Pierce to the edge of the court and the edge of rage. Pierce fell behind by 6-0, 2-0 and swore and threw her rackets. Then there was the comeback, and the 4-0 deficit in the third set. And always there was Huber at the baseline, grunting, twanging, dusting the lines.
SPORTS
September 4, 1999 | by Dana Pennett, Daily News Sports Writer
Time to kiss and make up. A day after serving verbal volleys at one another, Martina Hingis and the Williams family are engaging in a great big lovefest. At the postmatch press conference following yesterday's 6-3, 6-1 victory over Sandra Kloesel to advance to the round of 16, Hingis presented Richard Williams with the autographed jersey she said he's wanted for months. A kiss, a hug, a photo-op and everything is all better. "This is perfect timing," Hingis said, recognizing a good public relations opportunity when she sees one. "People make a big deal out of nothing and we have a great relationship, basically.
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SPORTS
November 9, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman , Daily News Sports Writer
Alexandra Stevenson is famous for two reasons: This summer it was disclosed that she is the daughter of basketball great Julius Erving, and at Wimbledon, she became the first qualifier to reach the women's semifinals. Since Wimbledon, however, her tennis was not quite at celebrity status. Off-Broadway was more appropriate. Before last night's first-round match in the Advanta Championships, Stevenson's record since Wimbledon was 1-5. With 17th-ranked Anke Huber across the net at Villanova's Pavilion, Stevenson's chances of an early exit seemed likely.
SPORTS
September 4, 1999 | by Dana Pennett, Daily News Sports Writer
Time to kiss and make up. A day after serving verbal volleys at one another, Martina Hingis and the Williams family are engaging in a great big lovefest. At the postmatch press conference following yesterday's 6-3, 6-1 victory over Sandra Kloesel to advance to the round of 16, Hingis presented Richard Williams with the autographed jersey she said he's wanted for months. A kiss, a hug, a photo-op and everything is all better. "This is perfect timing," Hingis said, recognizing a good public relations opportunity when she sees one. "People make a big deal out of nothing and we have a great relationship, basically.
SPORTS
November 12, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were Famous Tennis Names on Parade at the Villanova Pavilion yesterday, morning and afternoon, as five of the top 10 women in the world took to the powder-blue Supreme Court surface on the third day of the $450,000 Advanta Championships. The crowd had a chance to compare strokes with the likes of Martina Hingis, Jana Novotna and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, and to watch the continuing comeback of Steffi Graf, an unseeded player making a strong return from a series of injuries.
SPORTS
November 7, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first-round pairings for the Advanta Championships, a $450,000 WTA tour stop held at Villanova's Pavilion, were drawn yesterday with a bit of good luck for local favorite Lisa Raymond. Raymond will open the tournament, which begins Monday and will feature two sessions a day until Sunday's final, against a survivor of the qualifying. "I can't complain," said the 25-year-old Raymond, the native of Wayne who is ranked 25th in the world. "Any time you can start off against a qualifier, it's an advantage.
SPORTS
November 14, 1997 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This 2-6, 6-2, 7-5 loss left Lisa Raymond on the verge of tears, despondent at the way she had self-destructed while the light of Manhattan sparkled in her eyes and the berth against Martina Hingis in the Chase Championships at Madison Square Garden next week awaited her as one of the 16 best players in the world. For a set last night at Villanova's Pavilion, Raymond had played with courage and creativity. Her opponent, Germany's Anke Huber, admitted it. Sliced backhands too deep and too fast.
SPORTS
January 28, 1996 | By Andrea Leand, FOR THE INQUIRER
Holding the trophy over her head and wiping tears from her cheeks, Monica Seles celebrated her first Grand Slam title since being stabbed nearly three years ago. Having spent as much time in the training room as she has on court this fortnight, Monica Seles put the strains and stresses of her injuries out of her mind to cruise by eighth seed Anke Huber, 6-4, 6-1, Saturday morning and capture her fourth Australian Open crown. The reigning queen, whose fitness has been as much an issue this week as her tennis, intends to develop a new conditioning regimen after finishing her winter tournament schedule in Tokyo next week.
SPORTS
November 20, 1995 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the end, after 2 hours, 46 minutes, the tears mixed with the giggles, and Steffi Graf put her arm around Anke Huber, and Huber put her arm around Graf, but you couldn't tell - who was holding up whom? In only the seventh five-set women's final in tennis history, Graf had beaten Huber, 6-1, 2-6, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3, in the WTA Championships at Madison Square Garden. The 15,137 fans had been drawn to their feet dozens of times, mostly by heroics by Huber, and they had been gasping for breath more often than either of the women, who had been swinging from their heels.
SPORTS
November 11, 1995 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The idea came to Lori McNeil slowly, during the first set, when Conchita Martinez was stationed at the baseline, teeing off on passing shots and leaving McNeil bewildered. Hit short balls, McNeil finally decided. Make her run forward. See if Martinez could pass her on low, skidding balls up near the net. Martinez couldn't. And so Martinez, the No. 2 seed in the $800,000 Advanta Championships and a champion in Philadelphia two years ago, broke a toenail with all that running forward.
SPORTS
September 5, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Recovering from the shock and pain of a public stabbing would give any person a different perspective on life. When that victim is a sports celebrity like Monica Seles, her counsel can have a lasting, soothing effect on people. Before Monica Seles walked onto the Louis Armstrong Stadium Court yesterday for her round of 16 match with Anke Huber, she noticed Edit Pakay, a junior girls player in the locker room who had just lost a match. "I talked to this one girl that was crying," Seles said after winning, 6-1, 6-4. "She was from Hungary.
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