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Ann Weaver Hart

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NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple University is searching for its 10th president after Ann Weaver Hart surprised students and faculty on Friday by announcing she would step down. Hart, 62, said in an interview that she was caught between the twin demands of family and profession: A sick mother who needs her in Utah and a school that needs a president committed to the long haul. Hart will stay at Temple through this academic year, concluding her sixth in office, before moving to Utah. A national search for her replacement will begin immediately.
NEWS
September 9, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Entering her fourth year as Temple University's president, Ann Weaver Hart soon will unveil what could become her signature project: making Broad Street the focal point of the university. She envisions an eye-catching flagship library - a new academic soul for Temple that would be accessible to both neighborhood residents and students. Also in the plan, soon to be unveiled as part of the university's recognition of its 125th anniversary, are a high-rise residence hall and a spacious student center that may or may not be part of the library, both along the Broad Street corridor.
NEWS
May 5, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ann Weaver Hart, 57, will become Temple University's first woman president July 1 after a unanimous endorsement by the school's Board of Trustees yesterday afternoon. Hart, who has served the last four years as the president of the University of New Hampshire, was chosen out of more than 100 nominees and eight serious candidates, school officials said. She replaces David Adamany, who steps down at the end of June. "It was easy to settle on Dr. Hart," said Daniel H. Polett, the chairman of the search committee, who described the scene after she left her first interview with the committee: "Everybody looked at each other and said, 'Wow.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | Associated Press
Temple University will evacuate about 200 American students and staffers from the school's campus in Japan because of radiation fears, school officials said yesterday. The decision was based on a State Department warning and data from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which is monitoring leaks from Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, university president Ann Weaver Hart said in a statement. "The State Department strongly urges U.S. citizens to defer travel to Japan at this time and those in Japan should consider departing," according to the warning issued Wednesday.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
The dean of Temple University's College of Science and Technology was named interim provost of the university effective Sunday during Temple's board of trustees meeting Thursday. Hai-Lung Dai, a graduate of National Taiwan University and the University of California, Berkeley, joined Temple's staff in 2007. In addition to serving as dean, Dai is a Laura H. Carnell professor of chemistry and the senior vice provost for international affairs. Dai will replace Richard Englert, who is leaving the position to serve as Temple's acting president, also effective Sunday.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Dara McBride, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dean of Temple University's College of Science and Technology was named interim provost of the university effective July 1 during Temple's Board of Trustees meeting Thursday. Hai-Lung Dai, a graduate of National Taiwan University and University of California at Berkeley, joined Temple's staff in 2007. In addition to serving as dean, Dai is a Laura H. Carnell Professor of Chemistry and the senior vice provost for International Affairs. Dai will be replacing Richard Englert, who is leaving the provost position to serve as Temple's acting president, also effective July 1. Englert is replacing Ann Weaver Hart, who will become the president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
April 30, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ann Weaver Hart, Temple University's presumptive next president, has a lot to learn about the region's largest school. She hasn't set foot on Temple's campus in years, and she said she knows Philadelphia only "as a tourist. " "I need to get to Temple and talk to some people," said Hart, the University of New Hampshire president who was unanimously selected last week by Temple's presidential search committee. In her first interview as Temple's likely next president, Hart explained why she was a good fit for the school, promised to work closely with faculty, and said Temple could continue improving its academic standards while remaining true to its historic mission of serving low-income and first-generation college students.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2011
Frederick Lopez has joined Citizens Bank as vice president and senior business development officer in the Commercial Enterprise Banking division in Haddon Heights. He previously was a relationship manager with the former Sterling Bank based in Mount Laurel, which was acquired by Roma Bank in 2010. NaviGATE, a Villanova management-consulting firm, has appointed David X. Crossed managing partner and chief operating officer. Crossed had been a partner and managing director with SMART Business Advisory & Consulting L.L.C.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Mike Newall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with a potential 50 percent decrease in state funding, Temple University president Ann Weaver Hart on Friday announced administrative salary and hiring freezes, possible staff consolidations and benefit cuts, and other reductions, including a delay in filling five dean positions. Nearly all nonunion employees, including school administrators, will be affected by the freezes, which will take place immediately, said Ray Betzner, a Temple spokesman. The cost-cutting measures come in response to Gov. Corbett's proposed deep cuts in higher-education funding.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's incoming president will take office Monday, but will postpone laying out his agenda in an inauguration speech until October. Neil D. Theobald, whose inauguration had been scheduled for April, said he wanted more time to learn about the 39,000-student university before formulating a solid plan for the future. "The goal is to listen - what should our priorities be? - and discuss them," said Theobald, 56, who has just finished his tenure as senior vice president and chief financial officer at Indiana University.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
By unanimous vote, Neil D. Theobald, a top administrator at Indiana University, was appointed the 10th president of Temple University on Tuesday, following meetings with staff, faculty, and students at which he received positive reviews. "It is great to be an Owl," Theobald told the board of trustees, staff, and reporters shortly after the vote. "This is the dream job I've always wanted to have. " His selection culminates a nearly 10-month national search for the next leader of the 39,000-student campus in the heart of North Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By unanimous vote, Neil D. Theobald, a top administrator at Indiana University, was appointed the 10th president of Temple University on Tuesday, following meetings with staff, faculty, and students at which he received positive reviews. "It is great to be an Owl," Theobald told the board of trustees, staff, and reporters shortly after the vote. "This is the dream job I've always wanted to have. " His selection culminates a nearly 10-month national search for the next leader of the 39,000-student campus in the heart of North Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neil D. Theobald was headed on the same career path as his factory worker father until he confessed: "Dad, I think I'm going to college. " "Why would you want to do that ?" asked his father, who worked in the mail room at Caterpillar, a heavy-equipment company based in Peoria, Ill. Theobald, 55, now senior vice president and chief financial officer of Indiana University, went on to get his bachelor's degree, then a master's, then a doctorate. And on Tuesday, he will likely become the 10th president of Temple University.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Dara McBride, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dean of Temple University's College of Science and Technology was named interim provost of the university effective July 1 during Temple's Board of Trustees meeting Thursday. Hai-Lung Dai, a graduate of National Taiwan University and University of California at Berkeley, joined Temple's staff in 2007. In addition to serving as dean, Dai is a Laura H. Carnell Professor of Chemistry and the senior vice provost for International Affairs. Dai will be replacing Richard Englert, who is leaving the provost position to serve as Temple's acting president, also effective July 1. Englert is replacing Ann Weaver Hart, who will become the president of the University of Arizona.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
The dean of Temple University's College of Science and Technology was named interim provost of the university effective Sunday during Temple's board of trustees meeting Thursday. Hai-Lung Dai, a graduate of National Taiwan University and the University of California, Berkeley, joined Temple's staff in 2007. In addition to serving as dean, Dai is a Laura H. Carnell professor of chemistry and the senior vice provost for international affairs. Dai will replace Richard Englert, who is leaving the position to serve as Temple's acting president, also effective Sunday.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Colin McNickle
It's extortion by another name, this threat from the chieftains of Pennsylvania's four "state-related universities" to - gasp! - privatize their operations if state subsidies are slashed for the second year in a row. But they should be a lot more careful about how loudly they rattle their sabers, or these out-of-touch spendthrifts might just find themselves out of business. If forced to privatize, they soberly warn, tuition will escalate, discounts for in-state students will disappear, and the number of graduate programs will decline.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Corbett toured a Malvern factory powered by state-of-the-art robotics Tuesday, then hit the automatic-reset button on a replay of the state university tuition wars that dominated the battle over his first budget proposal last year. Corbett insisted to reporters during his tour of the high-tech Siemens Medical Solutions plant that his 2012-13 plan for a steep new cuts in state aid to higher education - including 30 percent less money to state-backed schools such as Pennsylvania State and Temple Universities - could be dealt with by reducing campus operating costs, not by raising tuition.
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