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Anne D Harnoncourt

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NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Admission to the Philadelphia Museum of Art will be free on Saturday in honor of director Anne d'Harnoncourt, who died June 1, 2008. The museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (The new timed-ticket "Late Renoir" exhibition is not included with free admission.) "Anne d'Harnoncourt, my predecessor, passed away two years ago this month," said Timothy Rub, the museum's director and chief executive. "To honor her memory and all that she did for this institution and the community it serves, we encourage our visitors to come and discover the collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
You can't blame Chris Potter for being a little flummoxed. Tasked with composing a new piece of music based on one of the paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection, the saxophonist was handed not a lush, colorful masterpiece of French impressionism or an explosion of color à la Jackson Pollock, but a stark, austere black-on-white piece by the minimalist Ellsworth Kelly. "To be honest," Potter recalls, "my first reaction when I saw it was, 'Wow, what on Earth am I going to do with this?
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
On the walls of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, starting today, near the usual first-person flourishes saying "Degas" or "G. Braque," astute visitors will begin noticing the appearance of a new signature. It says: Anne d'Harnoncourt. All around the museum - in Gallery 119 with the Wyeths, at the Japanese Temple and Teahouse, in the Perelman annex - museum staff spent the week putting up evidence that Anne Was Here. Blue labels with the d'Harnoncourt signature have been placed next to works acquired during her era, which ran as curator of 20th-century art from 1972 to 1982 and as director from 1982 until her death in June.
NEWS
June 29, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art today will name as its new leader Timothy Rub, chief executive officer of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Rub, 57, will take the post on Sept. 1, succeeding Anne d'Harnoncourt, who died last June after a quarter-century at the museum's helm. "This, for me, was a remarkable opportunity," Rub said. "This is a decision that I made with my heart as well as my mind. Philadelphia is just one of this country's great museums. " He leaves Cleveland after only three years - a short tenure, but an eventful one. During that time, the museum undertook a major expansion, acquired important new works, and was embroiled in the controversial question of provenance in an episode that ended with the return of 14 allegedly stolen or looted ancient works (all acquired decades ago, apparently innocently)
NEWS
June 3, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Anne d'Harnoncourt, 64, the formidable, high-spirited personification of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and an indefatigable advocate for the arts as central to the city's identity, died Sunday night. She passed away at her Center City home after undergoing a surgical procedure last week, said Art Museum chairman H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest. The Art Museum did not release a cause of death; there will be no autopsy, he said. "It's a shock and it's very sad. It's unimaginable - the museum world without her," said Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a friend and colleague for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In an unassuming gallery on the first floor of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a special exhibition is showcasing two of the greatest works ever created by artists in America. Both are inextricably bound to the cultural history and identity of Philadelphia - and both nearly disappeared from the city in recent years via out-of-town sales. But Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic (1875) and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Angel of Purity (1902) remain here, thanks in no small measure to the efforts of museum president Anne d'Harnoncourt, who died unexpectedly in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1998 | By Rathe Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the mighty and splendiferous works in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a homey little woodcarving of a tree full of birds is one of Anne d'Harnoncourt's favorites. "Each of us connects with the things in our collection in a different way," she says. "One man's beautiful is another man's ugly. " The director of the Art Museum is taking us on a tour of her eclectic, quirky, personal choices. "I picked some funny categories," she says with a laugh, "and some serious ones.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By JACK KELLY
I WAS HONORED AND PROUD to serve on the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Board of Trustees with Anne d'Harnoncourt. My appointment by City Council President Anna C. Verna as a board member who represents Council afforded me the privilege to work closely with, and get to know first-hand, the amazing person Anne was, and always will be remembered as. In my opinion, Anne was larger than life itself. Anne's professional accomplishments in the art community and world were insurmountable.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anne d'Harnoncourt, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art since 1982, confirmed yesterday that she has declined the job of director at New York's Museum of Modern Art. Although d'Harnoncourt, 51, made her decision during the summer, she acknowledged that it may not be widely known. "When you decide to stay somewhere, you don't send out a press release," she joked. D'Harnoncourt was one of several museum directors named as a possible successor to Richard E. Oldenburg, who announced his resignation as MoMA director in September 1993.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials of the Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday dedicated a gallery containing a Japanese Buddhist temple to the SmithKline Beckman Corp. in honor of the company's gift of $1 million to the museum. The money is the first major contribution to the museum's capital funding campaign, which museum officials hope will reach $50 million. It is the largest corporate gift the museum has received. "We're hoping it will prompt other corporations into giving to the campaign," said Henry Wendt, SmithKline Beckman's chairman and chief executive officer, shortly after he and museum director Anne D'Harnoncourt unveiled a small sign naming a room in the museum's Oriental Collections wing the SmithKline Beckman Gallery.
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NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud, 76, the seemingly indefatigable founder and director of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia and the Acadia Summer Arts Program - a.k.a. "Kamp Kippy" - in Maine, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine. She was, said Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, of great significance both to the Art Museum, where she was a long-serving trustee, and to the world of contemporary art, where she championed textiles as a medium and, ultimately, all things fashioned by hand.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A public memorial service will be held Monday, Dec. 8, for Frances Elliot Storey, 81, an artist and supporter of the arts in Philadelphia, who died Sunday, Oct. 5, of cancer at her Spring Garden home. The service is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Burial was private. Born in Boston in 1933, Mrs. Storey grew up in Needham and Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass. She attended Foxcroft School, then Radcliffe College, and graduated in 1956 with a degree in fine arts.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Gehry and a half-billion-dollar expansion project may have commanded attention at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but K-pop dance parties are really where it's at. Five years into his tenure as director, Timothy Rub is steering the great neoclassical temple at the end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway directly into the swirl of newness where the museum's future unquestionably lies: untapped audiences, previously neglected populations, generations...
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The celebrated architect Frank Gehry, who at 85 is just one year younger than the Philadelphia Museum of Art, visited the city Thursday to kick off a special exhibition detailing his plans for expanding the iconic museum building. While he has worked on the project for a decade, the museum is only now unveiling the design, which involves carving out a block-size space under the east terrace to create a new wing of galleries. Most of the improvements will be out of public view, except for two controversial proposals.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
For 86 years, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has reigned as the city's most majestic building, a golden crown perched in splendid isolation atop its Fairmount hill. Yet, there is a good reason it is still sometimes called the "Greek garage. " Inside, the great temple remains a work-in-progress. Now, a plan to expand the museum by burrowing deep into its rocky hillside, conceived and designed by celebrated architect Frank Gehry, promises to remedy this unfinished business, completing and polishing the masterpiece in time for its centennial in 2028.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Barbara Chase-Riboud vividly remembers traveling from her home in South Philadelphia to the great temple on a hill, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where she first took art classes as a little girl. "One of my dreams I can remember, going to classes at the museum, was that one day I was going to have an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum and I was going to have a banner across the facade," said Chase-Riboud, now 74. "I remember very well. It's been a long road. I'm a very old lady!"
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
WILMINGTON, Del. - When Danielle Rice was appointed executive director of the Delaware Art Museum in 2005, she says she embraced the job because of "the challenge. " After 19 years as head of educational programs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the last eight years as associate director of programs under museum director Anne d'Harnoncourt, Rice was eager to strike out on her own. "I thought I had a pretty good idea about what a museum director did," Rice recalled as she sat in her office Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
You can't blame Chris Potter for being a little flummoxed. Tasked with composing a new piece of music based on one of the paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection, the saxophonist was handed not a lush, colorful masterpiece of French impressionism or an explosion of color à la Jackson Pollock, but a stark, austere black-on-white piece by the minimalist Ellsworth Kelly. "To be honest," Potter recalls, "my first reaction when I saw it was, 'Wow, what on Earth am I going to do with this?
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It dangled high in the air, a connector seeking a connection, before slowly being lowered into the waiting earth. At 11:45 Wednesday morning, the Philadelphia Museum of Art was at last plugged in. After hours of maneuvering and digging and pondering, the museum installed the latest addition to its outdoor sculpture garden, a gift from the collector and philanthropist David Pincus - Claes Oldenburg's Giant Three-Way Plug, Scale A ...
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Admission to the Philadelphia Museum of Art will be free on Saturday in honor of director Anne d'Harnoncourt, who died June 1, 2008. The museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (The new timed-ticket "Late Renoir" exhibition is not included with free admission.) "Anne d'Harnoncourt, my predecessor, passed away two years ago this month," said Timothy Rub, the museum's director and chief executive. "To honor her memory and all that she did for this institution and the community it serves, we encourage our visitors to come and discover the collections.
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