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Anorexia

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NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suzanne Harootunian, 50, of Glen Mills, who fought the eating disorder anorexia nervosa for 20 years and went public with her story to help others, died of the disease Dec. 6 at her home. Mrs. Harootunian was born in Harrisburg, grew up in Havertown, and lived in Springfield, Delaware County, before moving to Glen Mills in 2003. She graduated from Archbishop Carroll High School in 1977 and attended Drexel University with a major in nutrition. Unlike many anorexics, who develop the disease in their teens, Mrs. Harootunian was afflicted at 30, she told ABC's 20/20 in a segment that aired early last year.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shannon Maher was 14 and nervous about starting high school. So she decided to "lose a few pounds. " She came close to losing her life. Four months into her diet, she overate last year at a Christmas party. That night in the mirror she saw "this horribly disgusting, fat person staring back at me. " Shannon made herself vomit, and her young life took a new course. "The feeling I got afterward was amazing," the Gloucester Catholic High School sophomore recalled recently.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Molly Hartmann Ahrens
By Molly Hartmann Ahrens When I was a teenager, I wondered if it was possible to recover from an eating disorder. I had been diagnosed with anorexia nervosa the spring I turned 13, and I couldn't remember a time when I hadn't been obsessed with food, calories, weight, and the way I looked. I didn't know what it felt like to live a "normal" life - one that did not revolve around what my last meal had been, what my next meal would be. I felt fat and uncomfortable in my body all the time, even when I was severely underweight and warned by doctors that I might die within two weeks if I didn't receive treatment immediately.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
In public, she was Little Miss Perfect, a brilliant child actress whose dazzling theatrical performances were matched only by offstage behavior so poised, so mature, so sweet and well-behaved that one incredulous interviewer dubbed her "the Marzipan Princess. " Privately, life for Patty Duke was very different indeed. The daughter of an alcoholic father and emotionally unstable mother, Duke was reared by a tyrannical husband-and-wife team of personal managers who, she says, introduced her to drugs and alcohol, mistreated her psychologically and sexually, and so regimented her life that she became little more than a wind- up doll who answered to a bogus name she loathed.
NEWS
September 25, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sorelle Marsh's bulimia began in college. For a formerly chubby kid still obsessed with food and weight, discovering how to get away with gluttony was a revelation. Gobbling thousands of calories and then vomiting the food all up "was my best friend," she says. "It was a drug, a way of dealing with everything. " But 20 years later, it had become her worst enemy. So last year, for the first time, the wife and mother of two young children sought treatment for her eating disorder.
LIVING
March 2, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When girls eat too little, become too skinny, and sometimes die, the reason for it often is given by turning a mirror at American life. What do you expect, the thinking goes, when thinness pervades the culture as an ideal for glamour and beauty? But culture alone isn't adequate to explain why some people develop eating disorders, said Wade Berrettini, director of the center for neurobiology and behavior at the University of Pennsylvania Health System. There's a significant genetic component as well, he said, a point of view that not all the experts share.
LIVING
April 3, 2000 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rich Brandon rubbed his aching legs. He had run 17 miles the day before, more than usual. He had to, he said, because he had eaten three bowls of corn flakes instead of his usual one. Feelings of guilt over the extra 500 calories forced the 24-year-old to extend his grueling ritual by five miles. Now, a day later, his legs were sore. "I had to run those extra miles," Brandon said as he entered his spotless kitchen in Cherry Hill and opened the refrigerator. Inside were four types of fat-free mustard and a two-liter bottle of Diet Orange Slice.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Channel 12 program director David Othmer said it was difficult for him to talk about his daughter's bout with anorexia in an upcoming PBS program on eating disorders, but that if sharing his experiences might help others then the interview was worth the discomfort. The program, "Dying to be Thin: Anorexia and Bulemia," which was produced by the Scranton public television station, airs Sunday at 10 p.m. on Channel 12. "As we got into the interview, it got harder to talk about," Othmer said.
FOOD
January 19, 2000 | Daily News wire services
All in the family Someone you love struggling with an eating disorder? The Renfrew Center is hosting family rap sessions Friday and Saturday nights at the Manor House at the center, 475 Spring Lane, off Ridge Avenue, in Philadelphia. Cost for the 7:30 p.m. sessions is $15 per family. An expert in anorexia, bulimia, compulsive overeating and other eating disorders will facilitate. Call 800-RENFREW (736-3739). All in the family Someone you love struggling with an eating disorder?
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
MALNOURISHED BONES. Teenage girls whose anorexia nervosa disrupts their menstrual periods have significantly weaker bones than do women who suffer the eating disorder later in life. That finding by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers suggests normal adolescent sexual development is crucial to healthy bones and avoidance of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis. The report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism underscores the dangers of anorexia, a frequent cause of irregular menstruation among teenage girls.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shannon Maher was 14 and nervous about starting high school. So she decided to "lose a few pounds. " She came close to losing her life. Four months into her diet, she overate last year at a Christmas party. That night in the mirror she saw "this horribly disgusting, fat person staring back at me. " Shannon made herself vomit, and her young life took a new course. "The feeling I got afterward was amazing," the Gloucester Catholic High School sophomore recalled recently.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Murphy findings awaited Brittany Murphy: The darkness spreads. So one might title continuing coverage of the 32-year-old actress' tragic death - which gossip rags claim was caused by everything from anorexia to Xanax. Authorities in Lalaland say an autopsy was completed on Monday, but results will be held pending completion of toxicology tests, which will take up to six weeks. TMZ says police found a cache of prescription drugs at Murphy's house, but nothing illegal.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suzanne Harootunian, 50, of Glen Mills, who fought the eating disorder anorexia nervosa for 20 years and went public with her story to help others, died of the disease Dec. 6 at her home. Mrs. Harootunian was born in Harrisburg, grew up in Havertown, and lived in Springfield, Delaware County, before moving to Glen Mills in 2003. She graduated from Archbishop Carroll High School in 1977 and attended Drexel University with a major in nutrition. Unlike many anorexics, who develop the disease in their teens, Mrs. Harootunian was afflicted at 30, she told ABC's 20/20 in a segment that aired early last year.
NEWS
September 25, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sorelle Marsh's bulimia began in college. For a formerly chubby kid still obsessed with food and weight, discovering how to get away with gluttony was a revelation. Gobbling thousands of calories and then vomiting the food all up "was my best friend," she says. "It was a drug, a way of dealing with everything. " But 20 years later, it had become her worst enemy. So last year, for the first time, the wife and mother of two young children sought treatment for her eating disorder.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Molly Hartmann Ahrens
By Molly Hartmann Ahrens When I was a teenager, I wondered if it was possible to recover from an eating disorder. I had been diagnosed with anorexia nervosa the spring I turned 13, and I couldn't remember a time when I hadn't been obsessed with food, calories, weight, and the way I looked. I didn't know what it felt like to live a "normal" life - one that did not revolve around what my last meal had been, what my next meal would be. I felt fat and uncomfortable in my body all the time, even when I was severely underweight and warned by doctors that I might die within two weeks if I didn't receive treatment immediately.
NEWS
August 5, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside a palatial house in Upper Roxborough, three dozen women and girls are arguing heatedly. The reason: leftover food on a plate. For these women, eating - or not eating - is an obsession. They suffer from anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders. All are patients at the sprawling Renfrew Center, seeking treatment for maladies that are often maddeningly difficult to cure. Renfrew is one of a handful of residential institutions in the country focusing exclusively on eating disorders - mental illnesses that afflict about eight million Americans, mostly women under 30. Therapy takes many forms, from individual counseling to group sessions, from monitored eating to gentle exercise.
SPORTS
July 30, 2002 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Christina Berry's brother wouldn't leave her alone. Three summers ago, Bill Berry had seen what crew had done for his high school girlfriend, Amanda Zimmerman. He thought it would also be a positive experience for Christina, who was recovering from anorexia. "He was bugging me about it during the summer," Christina Berry said. "He was always by my side and trying to be positive. He wanted me to get back to a healthy lifestyle. That was, I'm sure, part of his motivation. " Following her brother's advice and Zimmerman's lead, the 5-foot-10 Berry joined the Wilmington Youth Rowing Association in 1999 while a sophomore at West Chester Henderson.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prince Philip has put his royal foot in his royal mouth again - with a joke (?) about dogs and anorexics. Queen Elizabeth's boorish husband has caused blushes from China to Australia. His latest: In London, the prince said to blind Susan Edwards, using a wheelchair and accompanied by her guide dog: "Do you know they have eating dogs for the anorexic now?" Anorexia and Bulimia Care in London was not amused. Earlier this year in Australia, the prince asked Aborigines whether they still threw spears at each other.
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emaciated young women are displaying their protruding ribs and backbones, then boasting about five-day fasts, on pro-anorexia Web sites that celebrate the sisterhood of self-induced starvation. In the last few months, forums and clubs with such names as skin n'bones and anorexiarocks have flourished throughout cyberspace. The self-described "anas" recast the deadly psychiatric disorder - which affects mostly young women ages 14 to 24 - as a lifestyle choice. The virtual clubs also attract bulimics (who binge on food, then purge)
LIVING
January 21, 2001 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sonja Ross was not quite 12 years old, her adolescent frame already packed with 145 pounds, when she realized she was different from the other kids. "I didn't look the same, I didn't get asked to dances, I couldn't wear the same clothes," said Ross, who lives in Cinnaminson. Over the years she tried everything to lose weight - appetite suppressants, liquid diets, Overeaters Anonymous - but nothing worked. Some days she was so depressed she could hardly get out of bed. When she did, she gorged some more.
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