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NEWS
September 22, 2005
IDON'T UNDERSTAND why Judge Roberts couldn't answer simple questions. I thought judges were supposed to make decisions and write opinions and then stand by them. If a judge can't face Congress - or the public - and say what he really thinks on ANY given issue, why should we trust him? Judge Roberts stonewalled or refused to answer more than 100 questions. This doesn't sound like a man who is unafraid to stand up and be counted for who he is. John Roberts is the wrong man for the job of chief justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1987 | By DIANE WHITE, Special to the Daily News
I have been flipping through "The Book of Questions" (Workman, $3.95) and asking myself a question not in the book: Why am I doing this? One reason is that so many other people seem to be doing it, and I'm basically a sheep. Another reason is that I tend to find this sort of foolishness irresistible. For example, consider question 27, one of my favorites: "If God appeared to you in a series of vivid and moving dreams and told you to leave everything behind, travel alone to the Red Sea and become a fisherman, what would you do?"
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Trying to find answers is routine whenever a child dies in a seemingly avoidable accident. Couldn't something have been done to prevent the tragedy? Of course, the answer won't bring back the young victim. But perhaps it can ensure steps are taken to avoid a repeat of what never should have occurred. Such is the case with the death of 3-year-old Wynter Larkin, a "sweet" little girl, as one neighbor described her, who was crushed Sunday when a 2,000-pound store security gate fell on her at a Rita's Water Ice. For Philadelphians, it has become almost a rite in such cases to point a finger at the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections, which too frequently seems to have done too little before structures fall and people are hurt or killed.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Being the head coach of an NFL team for 13 years is not the same as being 13 years old, although you wouldn't realize that from Andy Reid's petulant behavior since his team got embarrassed by the New York Giants on Sunday. The coach was more efficient Sunday, saying the same nothing in three childish minutes as it took him 15 minutes to say Monday. In both cases, his news conferences were little more than opportunities for him to act out his contempt for the media. Reid provided some insight into his mind-set about his dealings with the media when he referred to them on his radio show as "crucifixions.
SPORTS
February 9, 1989 | By Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Every time the 76ers had a question, Charles Barkley had the answer. Could they score? He had 11 field goals in 13 attempts. Could they get to the glass? He had 15 rebounds. Could they get their share of second shots? He had 10 offensive rebounds. "He had a helluva night," Seattle coach Bernie Bickerstaff said after Barkley ruined one for the SuperSonics and prodded the 76ers to a 109-102 victory last night at the Spectrum. Had 31 points in 42 minutes and sent the Sixers into the All-Star break at 26-20, way ahead of the struggling 20-23 they took into last season's break, which ultimately cost then-coach Matt Guokas his job. Barkleymania solves a lot of problems, stems a lot of tides.
NEWS
September 6, 2005
I am the mother of Tammy Zywicki. I would like to thank the editorial staff of The Inquirer for giving the OK for the story about my daughter on the 13th anniversary of her death. I am grateful that Ed Colimore has an interest in Tammy's story. I thank him for the wonderful story he wrote ("FBI pursues tips in Zywicki slaying," Aug. 23). I would like to have some answers for closure. We have so many questions about what happened that day. There is a suspect who we feel has not been "ruled in" or "ruled out. " We would like to see some basic work done on this case and have officials tell us one way or the other what they have.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | BY DONALD KAUL
You know George Bush's unrehearsed, spontaneous, from-the-heart satellite conversations with voters? The ones where he is hooked up to the annual convention of the National Plumb Bob Manufacturers Association by satellite TV and answers questions from the audience? Word arrives that they are as phony as a sycophant's smile. The questions and answers are written out ahead of time by White House flacks. It's a charade. Bush got caught in flagrante delicto the other day when he found himself giving answer A to question B. So much for truth in government.
SPORTS
August 23, 2007 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Answers. The quarterback wanted answers. The ones Donovan McNabb got were unsatisfying and unsatisfactory. Just why did the Eagles shed one of their veteran leaders, Jeremiah Trotter, on Tuesday morning, mere weeks before the season begins? Why was the four-time Pro Bowler, and one of the only linebackers on the roster with meaningful starting experience, cut when the Eagles supposedly are trying to make a Super Bowl run? Why couldn't some sort of arrangement - a pay cut, a backup role, something - have been negotiated?
NEWS
March 29, 2009 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Staring at a laptop on his mother's kitchen table in Pottstown, B.J. Ellis ponders the meaning of life. But not for too long. Someone, somewhere, has spent 99 cents to ask this red-haired stranger a question for the ages. The sooner Ellis answers, the sooner he can move on to easier queries such as: Answer: 181 over six seasons. A superfan, Ellis adds that the TV counterterror agent lays waste to an average of 1.3 victims per hour. Answer: No. Most cats are lactose intolerant.
SPORTS
October 27, 1988 | By Tim Kawakami, Daily News Sports Writer
Four and four, just like always. The season is half over, and, as they have done in five of the last six seasons, the Eagles have maneuvered themselves to a 4-4 record. Coming into a season many observers consider crucial to the continuation of the Buddy Ryan regime, almost all of the players expected more than this. Randall Cunningham expected more than this. "I thought coming in we'd be better than we are," Cunningham said as the Eagles prepared to open the second half of the season Sunday against the 1-7 Atlanta Falcons at Veterans Stadium.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE CITY'S public school system is once again stuck in no man's land, otherwise known as a new budget cycle. The city charter requires the school district to adopt its budget by May 30, but funding from the city and state are a giant question mark at this point, leading to the possibility that the district might violate the charter and go past its deadline for the second straight year. "I can't see how the district would conceive of passing a budget by May 30," Bill Green, a member of the School Reform Commission, the district's governing body, said in a recent interview.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT WAS LATE SATURDAY, about 9 p.m., when James Hall double-parked in front of his home in West Philly. He had just gotten back from a shopping trip with his two daughters, his fiancee, Lakisha Robinson, and Robinson's daughter, Aniyah Curry. The group was getting ready to go back out, Robinson said yesterday, so Hall left the car's hazard lights on as he ran inside to grab something. He'd only be gone for a few minutes, he told the others. But in that short span, the family was nearly torn apart by a careless punk in a black sedan.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
INITIALLY, DESPITE the agonizing tragedy she was shouldering, Dominique Lockwood bore empathy for the driver who ended her youngest son's life. "Before, I felt bad for her, too," she told the Daily News last week. "I said, 'Oh, I can't imagine how this lady must feel.' " Abdul Latif Wilson - a bright, energetic 4-year-old whose mom said helped hold his family together - was run down April 13 by a Ford Edge after he darted into a street near his Kingsessing home from between two parked cars.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey legislators had little success Thursday clearing the cloud of questions surrounding Stockton University's December purchase of the Showboat casino. At Thursday's higher education budget hearing, lawmakers had hoped to interview outgoing Stockton president Herman J. Saatkamp Jr. about how the purchase got tripped up over a 1988 covenant that would block the property from being converted into a college campus. But Saatkamp went on immediate medical leave Tuesday and was not available to testify.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lenora Osborne was driving down Washington Lane in Cheltenham when she saw it. All that was left of Wyncote Academy, the private school her son attended in a 19th-century mansion, was a smoldering shell. "I saw this devastation and I went into total shock," Osborne recalled about that day in March. Then the news grew more shocking: Investigators ruled the blaze arson. Multiple fires had been set in the building, the fire marshal said. Six weeks later, questions remain for the small, close-knit Montgomery County school: Who set the fire, and why?
SPORTS
April 24, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Columnist
ZIP THAT North Face up over your chin. Roll your hands halfway up your sleeves. Close your eyes and . . . Dream, baby, dream. The game-time temperature of yesterday's Phillies game at Citizens Bank Park was announced at 49 degrees. This was actually 2 degrees warmer than at the start of Game 5 of the 2008 World Series, but there were 45,940 people in the stands that night. Human body heat - and the anticipation of a world championship - can numb you up real good. So can runs and big hits and key pitches.
NEWS
April 14, 2015
"TOO BIG to fail" describes the notion that a business is so large and important to the economy that government must do anything to prevent its failure. That term gained currency during the banking debacle that led to the Great Recession. If you were a victim, "too big to fail" carries a promise of protection that suggests that some companies are, in fact, too big to question. One bright spot in the post-recession era is that more big companies are being subject to greater scrutiny and questions.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Is Evesham Mayor Randy Brown acting like a jerk? That's just one of many questions left to linger at the South Jersey town's recent public meetings. Brown has acquired a degree of infamy by declaring that he and the rest of the Township Council would no longer answer residents' questions during meetings, as The Inquirer's Jan Hefler reported last week. While members of the public are still allowed to speak, any response or acknowledgment by officials has been deemed optional since January.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
WHEN CHURCH was over yesterday afternoon in North Philly, Jomo Brown walked over to a Lehigh Avenue shopping center and entered a Rite Aid, not really knowing what he was looking for or how it would help heal his pain. Brown, 45, looked over the shelves in Aisle 3, at the plastic Easter eggs and stuffed bunnies. He grabbed a red teddy bear, likely a leftover from Valentine's Day. He bought the $9 bear, which held a heart that said "I Love You," and the cashier put it in a black plastic bag. Brown took the bear outside, bent down and placed it amid a makeshift memorial of candles and flowers outside the GameStop store where Philadelphia Police Officer Robert F. Wilson III was fatally shot during a robbery Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - This time, the presidential cattle call was held at the state fairgrounds - which seemed appropriate, given the topics. Corn-based ethanol, immigration, genetically modified food, wind-energy tax credits, groundwater regulations, crop insurance, trade. Over seven hours, nine potential Republican candidates addressed detailed questions about those and other issues important to the agricultural industry in Iowa, the state that produces about 10 percent of the nation's food, and, more important, holds the first 2016 nominating contest.
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