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Antarctica

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NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Kate Tyndall, Special to The Inquirer
In Antarctica, where temperatures can plummet to minus 120 degrees Fahrenheit and it can take half a day to dig a hole for a telephone pole, the cold, the snow and the wind pose special design problems for engineers at U.S. research stations. In fact, the National Science Foundation station, Siple II, was closed last month because weather conditions made it impossible to operate, at least economically, said Bob Haehnle, the foundation's chief engineer for polar programs. Right now Siple II, built in 1979, is buried under 50 feet of snow, and its predecessor, Siple I, built in 1973, sits beneath 100 feet of snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Cameras don't exactly lie, they generate alternative truths. Sandy Sorlien's exhibition at Swarthmore College, "Imagining Antarctica," proves as much. Her 16 black-and-white prints describe a plausible facsimile of the frozen continent. It spoils the fun to learn that Sorlien made many of her photos in less-than-exotic New Jersey. The series evolved from Sorlien's failure to win a place in a National Science Foundation program that transports artists and writers to Antarctica. So she decided to hitch her vision to her imagination.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | By Stefan Fatsis, Associated Press
Scientists have been making annual trips to the pristine ice sheets of Antarctica for 15 years to search for meteorites, and of the more than 7,000 found, six came from the moon and maybe one from Mars. Those seven tiny meteorites have been the focus of years of scrutiny by scientists looking for insight on the composition of other members of the solar system. "It has always been assumed that a lot of material should be falling off the moon from meteoritic impact," said Ursula B. Marvin, a geologist at the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The popular response to the designs and subjects of the 1986 Arctic explorers commemoratives has prompted the U.S. Postal Service to honor men who ventured to the other pole. A block of four 25-cent commemoratives will be issued Wednesday honoring four explorers of Antarctica. First-day ceremonies will be in the Grosvenor Auditorium of the National Geographic Society building in Washington. The ceremonies also will recognize the 100th anniversary of the society, which has funded numerous polar expeditions.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antarctica is about the size of the United States and Mexico combined. Its 5.4 million square miles amount to a 10th of the earth's land surface, and during the winter ice doubles its size. The continent is covered almost entirely by an ice sheet that is three miles thick in places. Ninety percent of this planet's ice and 70 percent of its fresh water are locked in this vast accumulation of freezer frost. Antarctica is awesome and, if Wild Ice: Antarctic Journeys is any indication, a monumentally fascinating place.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
J. Lloyd Abbot Jr., 94, a retired rear admiral who was a naval aviator during World War II and later commanded the first regularly scheduled wintertime support flights to Antarctica in the 1960s, died Aug. 10 of congestive heart failure in Alexandria, Va. Except for the occasional emergency medical-evacuation flight, no airplanes flew in or out of Antarctica during the harsh winter. In coordination with the National Science Foundation, he organized the first scheduled winter flight to Antarctica in June 1967.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
American Will Steger and a team of international explorers, cheered by scores of relatives and other well-wishers, left aboard a Soviet transport plane last night to attempt the first trans-Antarctica trek by dogsled. Steger, 44, and five explorers from five countries, who are to make stops in Latin America on their way to the bottom of the world, are to begin the 4,000-mile, seven-month trek Aug. 1. The team flew out with 42 dogs and 13,000 pounds of equipment. "The expedition's purpose is to draw attention to Antartica and to efforts to preserve the continent," Steger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Antarctica," the new Omnimax film that opens today for a five-month run at the Franklin Institute's Tuttleman Omniverse Theater, paints an unremittingly harsh and desolate portrait of life on the planet's southernmost continent. From the opening scene of an icebreaker crunching noisily through ocean ice to a shot of an abandoned bulldozer that has plunged haplessly into a crevasse, the view is mostly bleak, frigid and, occasionally, frightening. Clearly, Australian director John Weiley has sought to depict the hardship of life on the coldest, windiest and driest continent by piling scene upon scene of ice, wind and barren landscapes.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Joined by undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau and more than 200 environmental groups, France and Australia called yesterday for Antarctica to be declared a wilderness preserve, an idea the United States opposes. Speaking at the start of an 11-day meeting of Antarctic Treaty nations, French Premier Michel Rocard said that Antarctica must be preserved for world science. "Its purity is such that it is an irreplaceable site for observing the ozone layer and the changes taking place in the atmosphere," he said.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Pamela Constable, Boston Globe
The sleek white gliderlike airplane moved out of the heavily guarded hangar and paused on a runway in Chile's southernmost city. Eight seconds later, with a roar of its jet engine, the ER-2 rose abruptly and vanished into the blue. For the next seven hours, the high-altitude research plane cruised for 1,000 miles over the frozen heart of Antarctica, reaching heights of 65,000 feet and temperatures as low as minus 130 degrees Fahrenheit, while the pilot switched sensitive instruments on and off to test the pattern and chemical content of the air. The mission of the ER-2, along with a larger, modified DC-8 plane flying a similar path at 37,000 feet with 40 scientists aboard, was to find the cause of a phenomenon that could have profound implications for the future of life on Earth: a huge, mysterious gap over Antarctica in the layer of ozone gas that protects animals and plants from 99 percent of the sun's radiation.
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NEWS
October 12, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BOBBY HILL, 14, the boy soprano who sang Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Pie Jesu" for Pope Francis on the parkway, is one of 600 children who find their voices in Commonwealth Youthchoirs, housed in the First Presbyterian Church in Germantown. Many of the boys and girls, grades pre-K through 12, come from underserved Philadelphia public schools, where music programs were early casualties of threadbare budgets. But in Commonwealth Youthchoirs' four programs, they learn to sing as joyfully as Bobby did when he charmed the pope and millions watching in person and on TV. Steve Fisher, choir director of the Keystone State Boychoir, where Bobby sings, said he almost panicked at the papal concert - not because of Bobby, who nailed his solo, but because of the rock Bobby gave the pope afterward.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2015 | By Kathleen Tanner, For The Inquirer
It had been at the top of my bucket list for several years, so when circumstances made it possible for me to travel in the winter of 2014, I quickly booked my trip the preceding spring. Who could have predicted that such a brutal winter lay ahead? With one crippling winter storm after another, the obvious question posed by friends after learning of my upcoming vacation was where I was headed. More than a few brows were raised when I meekly replied, "Antarctica. " After coping with the relentless weather and five days without power in February, even I began to question the wisdom of my choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antarctica: A Year on Ice isn't a nature documentary, though it does contain some wonderful panoramic time-lapse footage of the frozen continent. This labor of love from Anthony Powell (producer, director, writer, cinematographer) is more of a work diary, tracing the extreme ebbs and flows of staff living and toiling at McMurdo Station, Antarctica's largest research facility, over the course of a year. During the summer, which begins in October, upward of 5,000 people fly into the polar region to staff the roughly 30 international outposts.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Saturday, Tara Toocheck hurried to log onto Skype and talk to her son, Nikolas, halfway around the world. "Mommy, I feel so great. I feel fresh," the boy, 11, told his mother back in Pocopson Township, Chester County. "Now, I want to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. " An hour earlier, Nikolas had crossed the finish line of a 26.2-mile race in the shadow of the Caucasus Mountains in the Republic of Georgia. Nikolas isn't old enough to join the cross-country team at his school. But when the preteen finished the Kazbegi Marathon, he accomplished in less than two years a feat most people don't in a lifetime: He had run a marathon on every continent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
YOU CAN'T ALWAYS GET what you want, but WMGK's John DeBella thinks he knows what the Philadelphia Boys Choir needs. The mustachioed morning-radio host thinks the Rolling Stones should invite the Philadelphia Boys Choir onstage when they play the Wells Fargo Center on June 18 and 21. (Tickets are still available for the "50 and Counting" tour at ComcastTIX.com.) The Philadelphia Boys Choir is "an untapped gem in this city. It's crazy we have this world-class choir that people don't know exists," DeBella told me, adding he ran it by Stones keyboardist Chuck Leavell when he visited his show.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s, when he was in his 40s, Jack Rosenberg decided to give up swimming and start running every day. The kind of man who "never did anything in a mediocre fashion," in the words of his daughter, Anne, the surgeon ran eight miles each morning along Route 130 from his Mount Laurel home to his office, at what was then Rancocas Valley Hospital in Willingboro. Each morning his wife, Sylvia, to whom he was married for 57 years, would be waiting at his office with his suit.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
LONDON - George Lowe, the last surviving climber from the team that made the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, has died. He was 89. He died Wednesday at a nursing home in Ripley, central England, after an illness. Lowe directed a film of the expedition, "The Conquest of Everest," and also made "The Crossing of Antarctica," a movie about a trans-Antarctic expedition later in the 1950s. - Associated Press
BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may be an Anglophile or a Francophile, or simply interested in news and views from around the world. Smartphone applications put international radio at your fingertips. TuneIn Radio , free from TuneIn Inc., comes in versions for devices of all kinds. Hear thousands of stations and millions of podcasts, from every continent, including the Web-station outpost playing folk music the other evening from windswept Snow Hill Island, Antarctica. Pick your stations on TuneIn by geography, format, or genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
When Tara Toocheck was pregnant with her son, Nik, she knew he would be active and energetic. Unlike his older sister, Thea, who was quiet and serene, Nik seemed to regard his mother's womb as a confining rumpus room. Her expectations were correct. Nik, now 9, has proven to be the very definition of hyperkinetic. Full of boyish glee, he plays football, baseball, ice hockey, and squash. He has also become a prodigious runner. In kindergarten, at age 6, he ran his first 5K. When his father, Dan, joined the Air Force Reserve and began training for the fitness test, Nik kept pace with him. In 2010, Nik ran the Downingtown Turkey Trot 5K. He finished fourth in his age category, just missing the chance to win a holiday pie. The following year, he finished first among runners under 12. His trophy: an apple pie. In three years, Nik has participated in more than 100 races, ranging from a quarter mile to a marathon - he ran his first in November in Lewes, Del., covering the 26.2 miles in 5 hours, 56 minutes.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | BY ALI WATKINS, Daily News Staff Writer watkina@phillynews.com, 215-854-5905
PENGUINS DON'T RUN fast. Or so Nik Toocheck has heard. The 9-year-old West Chester boy will see for himself this weekend when he arrives in King George Island, off the Antarctic Peninsula, where he'll run his second full-distance marathon amid the glaciers, icebergs and wildlife of the South Pole in the first White Continent Marathon. Next Monday's race is the second step in Nik's mission to run marathons on seven continents. He would be the youngest person to accomplish that feat and, based on available data, the youngest person to run a marathon in Antarctica.
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