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Anthology

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Kaos" ("Chaos"). An anthology film directed by Paolo and Vittorio Taviani from a screenplay by Tonino Guerra and the Tavianis. Running time: 188 minutes. Spoken in Italian with English subtitles. An MGM/U.A. release. At the Ritz Five, 214 Walnut St. Like most of their films, Italy's Taviani brothers' "Kaos" ("Chaos") is at once ambitious and simple, big and intimate, difficult to grasp but impossible to dislike. It's the kind of movie that stirs emotions of which other films are hardly even aware.
SPORTS
October 28, 2011
D aily News sports writer Mark Kram's work again has been included in the "Best American Sports Writing" anthology. Kram's story, headlined "Life Goes On," has been selected by guest editor Jane Leavy as among the best sports stories of 2010. The piece focused on the aftermath of the death of boxer Francisco "Paco" Rodriguez following a fight at the Blue Horizon and the lives that were saved by his family's decision to donate his organs. The story has been honored multiple times, including by the Associated Press Sports Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors, Keystone Society of Professional Journalists, and the Boxing Writers Association of America.
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Watching her beloved grandfather die of cancer broke Samantha Endur's heart, but she just couldn't seem to tell anyone how she felt. Instead, the fourth grader wrote a poem: He lies in bed all the time He lies there thin and ill He's dying here and now Soon he will be faraway. . . . "It was easier to write about it than talk about it," said Samantha, who attends the J.F. Cooper School in Cherry Hill. Writing it down not only gave Samantha a means of expressing her sadness, but also landed her a place of honor in a state anthology of student works.
NEWS
November 7, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Get Hal Willner to talk about music, and pretty soon he'll be talking about listening to WDAS as a teenager in Bala Cynwyd. On this Saturday afternoon, Willner, the record producer renowned for daring multi-artist albums such as his new The Harry Smith Project: Anthology of American Folk Music Revisited, is wearing his hat as music director of Saturday Night Live. On his desk at 30 Rock, there are Cecil Taylor and Jelly Roll Morton CDs, and across his T-shirt Chuck Berry is doing the duck walk as Willner goes about the nerve-wracking task of scoring a live television show that is being rewritten as the day goes on. The traditional folk tune "Comin' Round the Mountain," Willner decides, will work best in a skit that stars host John C. Reilly as a racist tour guide in faux-colonial Williamsburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
For the carloads who race east down Bainbridge Street, anxious to avoid South Street's traffic restrictions, the historical marker at 1006 Bainbridge is no more than a blue-and-gold blur. Even to the pedestrian, the plaque's tale, like a modern movie capsule, alerts more than it informs. "Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)," the 1991 signpost announces. "An author, lecturer, and social activist, Harper lived here and devoted her life to championing the rights of slaves and free Blacks.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
When the Beatles' much-hyped "Anthology 1" was released last fall, it was fully expected not only to blow right onto the pop albums chart with a No. 1 debut, but also to break a flurry of sales records. It easily met all expectations. The recent release of the second installment in the Beatles' trilogy - the much-less-hyped "Anthology 2" - sparked just one question: How could it possibly compete with the phenomenal numbers racked up by "Anthology 1"? The answer: It couldn't - but its performance was still impressive.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
You say you want a resolution? For more than two decades, the surviving members of the Beatles have fielded question after question about why they have never told their own story. The 1980 murder of John Lennon dampened the prospects for an authorized movie on the band, but the personal conflicts and legal hassles were the biggest roadblocks. "They've been trying to do it for 20 odd years," said Chips Chipperfield, producer of "The Beatles Anthology" TV special, "and when John died, they thought it could never be done.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | By Sara M. Lomax, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this story
"BREAKING ICE: AN ANTHOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN FICTION" Viking. $24.95. 690 pages. Hard cover. Penguin. $10.95. 690 pages. Soft cover. Terry McMillan remembers exploding back in 1987. "I, like, got angry - and I'm not one to normally get angry," she said, recalling the day in her office at the University of Wyoming - she was teaching there at the time - when she received an anthology of the "year's best" short stories. "I looked in it and noticed that, once again, there was an absence of African-American writers," McMillan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Unlike most movie sequels, Boys Life 2 represents a marked improvement in technical polish over the 1995 original. But in offering another anthology on gay life, the collection of four short films underlines the weaknesses as well as the strengths of the short. The best entry in Boys Life 2 is Mark Christopher's "Alkali, Iowa," which is based on a feature-length script he hopes to direct and plays as a work in progress with considerable promise. The feeblest is a bit of throwaway fluff called "Must Be the Music," a chronicle of a night of club life and young gays on the town in L.A. that ends where it should be beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Paul McCartney is laughing with giddy, childlike abandon. John Lennon, heard in the distance, pretends he's calling a square dance. At one point the song they're recording, "Teddy Boy," disintegrates, only to come clattering back even loopier than before. As historical footnotes go, "Teddy Boy" - a McCartney song included on the just-released Anthology 3 (Apple/Capitol . 1/2), which marks the final chapter in the long and winding Beatles archive marketing blitz - seems fairly slight.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY SEAN O'CONNELL, Washington Post
"V/H/S" ENDS with an actual train wreck. But don't think of this as a spoiler. Consider it a warning, because the rest of the film is a train wreck as well. Realizing that horror's "found footage" gimmick has grown stale, "V/H/S" takes the next step forward by looking a few steps back. It uses a traditional anthology format, dividing its run time across multiple shorter stories that usually are connected by a thematic thread. On paper, it's a clever conceit. The framing story - which exists solely to get us to the abbreviated chapters - follows a group of destructive idiots hired by an unknown client to break into a deserted home and retrieve a VHS tape.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | Reviewed by Thomas Devaney
Transfer By Naomi Shihab Nye BOA Editions. 119 pp. $16   Naomi Shihab Nye is one of the most spirited voices in American poetry. The author, editor, and translator of more than 30 volumes, she is best known for her poetry collections Fuel (1998) and You and Yours (2005), and her award-winning anthology of international poems for young people This Same Sky (1992), which represents 129 poets from 68 countries. In her affirming introduction for that book, she writes, "Whenever someone suggests ‘how much is lost in translation!
SPORTS
October 28, 2011
D aily News sports writer Mark Kram's work again has been included in the "Best American Sports Writing" anthology. Kram's story, headlined "Life Goes On," has been selected by guest editor Jane Leavy as among the best sports stories of 2010. The piece focused on the aftermath of the death of boxer Francisco "Paco" Rodriguez following a fight at the Blue Horizon and the lives that were saved by his family's decision to donate his organs. The story has been honored multiple times, including by the Associated Press Sports Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors, Keystone Society of Professional Journalists, and the Boxing Writers Association of America.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
By Garrison Keillor Viking. 512 pp. $20.95 Reviewed by John Timpane I read hundreds of poems like these when I was coming up. I'm grateful to them. They helped get me started loving poetry. The volume at hand joins Garrison Keillor's otheranthologies, Good Poems of 2003 and Good Poems for Hard Times of 2005. Here, Keillor fills his pages with poems in which people's lives take place against the landscapes of this country. Place, scene, where it happened , are as vibrant as any human presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2010 | By JAMES JOHNSON, For the Daily News
"THE ANTHOLOGY of Rap" is one of the first attempts at a comprehensive examination of hip-hop, from its inception to the present day, as a poetic form. Edited by Adam Bradley and Andrew DuBois, the book (Yale University Press, $35) is epic - an 800-plus-page tome with a foreword by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and afterwords by Chuck D and Common. Bradley, an associate English professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and DuBois, an associate professor of English at the University of Toronto at Scarborough, relied on a 21-person advisory board composed of poets, professors and MCs to aid in the book's creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexandre Aja's gory creature feature Piranha 3D , which has been chewing up the box office with monstrously good reviews, has an equally classy and worthy predecessor from 1978. It's finally available in the new, restored edition, Roger Corman's Cult Classics: Piranha from Shout! Factory ( www.shoutfactory.com ; $19.93 DVD; $26.97 Blu-ray; rated R). Conceived as a Jaws ripoff, the film transcended its budgetary constraints because of the team assembled by '60s low-budget king Roger Corman, including writer John Sayles and director Joe Dante.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Natalie Merchant, longtime musician, was a brand-new mother. "I thought, 'Now I'm a mother, maybe I should do a children's album, like everyone else is doing,' " she says by phone from her home in New York State. "So I began collecting lullabies. " She started by singing into a recorder while breast-feeding. "As I raised my daughter, I felt a connection to the future, and to unbroken ways of child-rearing and care that have remained unchanged for thousands of years," she says, "and that gave me a burst of energy.
NEWS
November 7, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Get Hal Willner to talk about music, and pretty soon he'll be talking about listening to WDAS as a teenager in Bala Cynwyd. On this Saturday afternoon, Willner, the record producer renowned for daring multi-artist albums such as his new The Harry Smith Project: Anthology of American Folk Music Revisited, is wearing his hat as music director of Saturday Night Live. On his desk at 30 Rock, there are Cecil Taylor and Jelly Roll Morton CDs, and across his T-shirt Chuck Berry is doing the duck walk as Willner goes about the nerve-wracking task of scoring a live television show that is being rewritten as the day goes on. The traditional folk tune "Comin' Round the Mountain," Willner decides, will work best in a skit that stars host John C. Reilly as a racist tour guide in faux-colonial Williamsburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
You may not know this, but Canadians created many of the inventions to which we owe modern civilization. Air hockey. Frozen fish fillets. Instant mashed potatoes. The paint roller. Yes, I know. Where would we be without them? Those sleepy, earnest, good-hearted Canadians. God bless their Galilean souls. Now comes word from up north that Margaret Atwood, Canada's foremost female novelist, is developing a remote autographing device that will allow authors to sign books for devoted readers from afar, without those awful tours writers often dread.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By John Timpane
A man died in February, and even though he is gone, we are much richer than before he came. Of course, many of us felt bereaved, abandoned, full of grief when Gil Ott passed. But he was a citizen who spent his time building, placing brick on brick, firming up right relations, making new, good things that hadn't been there before. It's a stronger city because he was here; his life is, in many ways, a model, a cause for gratitude and rejoicing. First and foremost, Gil was a father and husband.
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