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Anthrax

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NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Canadian authorities let a Brazilian ship that had been quarantined off the coast of Nova Scotia continue to Quebec yesterday after tests showed that anthrax did not kill one of its sailors. The test results ended speculation that the dead Egyptian seaman had been trying to smuggle anthrax into Canada as part of a terrorist plot. Crewmen on the ship said Ibrahim Saved Soliman Ibrahim became violently ill and vomited blood after opening a suitcase that he was carrying to an unidentified Canadian friend.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By Shannon McCaffrey and Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. law-enforcement officials said yesterday that they were monitoring the death in Brazil of an Egyptian seaman bound for Canada who might have been transporting anthrax. A Brazilian government medical investigator whose office performed the tests said he and federal police suspect that anthrax might have killed Ibrahim Saved Soliman Ibrahim. Ibrahim had just reached his ship, a bauxite carrier, on April 11 in the port of Porto Trombetas, Brazil, when he told shipmates he felt sick.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Age of Anthrax is under way. For years, this New York-based quintet has toiled in arenas around the world, opening for the big guns of metal and speed metal. Always respected for its finessed musicianship, the band has yet to secure the headliner status critics (and die-hard fans) believe it deserves. That should change this year. Anthrax has a new singer, a new record label, and an extraordinary new album - Sound of White Noise, to be released by Elektra tomorrow. The internal upheaval, risky for any band on the cusp, paid off. With its unrelenting guitar-as-power-tool attack and its surprisingly intelligent themes, Anthrax is poised to shake up the increasingly staid world of metal.
NEWS
October 26, 2001 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on rumor, innuendo, colleagues' exaggerations and Daily News wire services
_ WE'D RATHER WATCH: As the Daily News reported so well in recent days, CBS news anchor Dan Rather has decided to defy the anthrax terrorists by refusing to be tested or treated for the disease. We say to Dan: "Courage. " Others may say: "Fool. " Still others, cynics that they are, have speculated that Mr. Rather says one thing in public and is doing quite a different thing behind those closed CBS doors. ("Hurry, Doc, I'm on the air in six minutes!") But in the spirit of good journalism, since Mr. Rather has become the news rather than a purveyor of it, we think he deserves a watch.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY DEBORAH WOODELL, Daily News Staff Writer woodeld@phillynews.com
WHAT does a thrash-metal icon talk about in his one-man show? Anything he wants. "My mental checklist is in my brain," Anthrax co-founder and guitarist Scott Ian said in a telephone interview this week, describing his method for coming up with the material in his "Speaking Words" tour, a 15-stop run that comes to the World Cafe Live on Sunday night. "It's all in my brain. I don't make a set list, like a band show. " He's kept things loose. Just the other night, he said, someone in the crowd in Cleveland yelled out something about Kiss, and Ian was able to turn it into a 25-minute riff.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The FBI is investigating a bomb and anthrax hoax at the U.S. District Court building in Camden. A mail clerk opened an envelope Friday morning to find a letter claiming a bomb was in the building and the white powder inside the envelope was anthrax, said Juan Matos, the U.S. marshal for New Jersey. The building was locked down and a K-9 unit scoured it. No bomb was found, and the powder tested negative for anthrax and other biological agents. The letter is undergoing forensic analysis at a state police laboratory in Hamilton to identify the sender.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | By Sumana Chatterjee and Cassio Furtado INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
New traces of anthrax have been found in two Capitol Hill office buildings where the germ already had been discovered. Authorities have no explanation why tiny amounts of the deadly bacteria keep showing up, but the discovery puts on hold efforts to clean and reopen an important Senate building. Tiny amounts of the bacteria were found in three locations in the Hart Senate Office Building and one in the Longworth House Office Building, according to an official at the Environmental Protection Agency, which is decontaminating the congressional buildings.
NEWS
February 4, 2004 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.S. Postal Service is installing a costly new biohazard-detection system, but as now configured the system would not have detected the ricin that turned up Monday in a Senate office building. "Right now we're set up for anthrax," said Paul Smith, public affairs manager for the Postal Service's Eastern region. "The system can be configured to stop other [biological] agents; it would require a software adjustment. " The system is being installed in 282 mail-processing plants across the country.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney and Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The South Jersey mail processing center in Bellmawr was reopened yesterday morning after an emergency overnight cleaning and a barrage of tests following news Saturday that anthrax had been detected on machinery. The Camden County mail center had been closed for 2 1/2 days last week after mail processor William Trainer Jr., 54, of Wilmington, developed a lesion believed to be cutaneous anthrax on his hand. The center was reopened Friday when early FBI tests found no evidence of contamination.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
A white powder discovered at the Federal Courthouse in Center City turned out to be a false alarm this morning. Shortly after 9:30 a.m., a hazmat team responded to a report of the discovery of a white powder on the building's second floor, according to police and fire officials. A prisoner in the building allegedly sent a letter to an office on the second floor and claimed the envelope contained anthrax, leading to the evacuation of the floor, according to Executive Fire Chief Richard Davison.
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NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY DEBORAH WOODELL, Daily News Staff Writer woodeld@phillynews.com
WHAT does a thrash-metal icon talk about in his one-man show? Anything he wants. "My mental checklist is in my brain," Anthrax co-founder and guitarist Scott Ian said in a telephone interview this week, describing his method for coming up with the material in his "Speaking Words" tour, a 15-stop run that comes to the World Cafe Live on Sunday night. "It's all in my brain. I don't make a set list, like a band show. " He's kept things loose. Just the other night, he said, someone in the crowd in Cleveland yelled out something about Kiss, and Ian was able to turn it into a 25-minute riff.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
A white powder discovered at the Federal Courthouse in Center City turned out to be a false alarm this morning. Shortly after 9:30 a.m., a hazmat team responded to a report of the discovery of a white powder on the building's second floor, according to police and fire officials. A prisoner in the building allegedly sent a letter to an office on the second floor and claimed the envelope contained anthrax, leading to the evacuation of the floor, according to Executive Fire Chief Richard Davison.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The FBI is investigating a bomb and anthrax hoax at the U.S. District Court building in Camden. A mail clerk opened an envelope Friday morning to find a letter claiming a bomb was in the building and the white powder inside the envelope was anthrax, said Juan Matos, the U.S. marshal for New Jersey. The building was locked down and a K-9 unit scoured it. No bomb was found, and the powder tested negative for anthrax and other biological agents. The letter is undergoing forensic analysis at a state police laboratory in Hamilton to identify the sender.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Curt Anderson, Associated Press
MIAMI - More than a decade after tabloid photo editor Robert Stevens became the first victim of the 2001 anthrax attacks, the U.S. government has agreed to pay his widow and family $2.5 million to settle their lawsuit, according to documents released Tuesday. Stevens, 63, died Oct. 5, 2001, when a letter containing deadly anthrax spores was opened at the then-headquarters in Boca Raton of American Media Inc., publisher of the National Enquirer, Sun, and Globe tabloids. Eventually four more people would die and 17 others would be sickened in similar letter attacks, which the FBI blames on a lone government scientist who committed suicide.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Randolph E. Schmid, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Should the anthrax vaccine be tested on children? It will be a while longer before the government decides. An advisory board said Friday that ethical issues still needed to be resolved but that if they could be, the vaccine could be tested in children to be sure it's safe and to determine the proper dose in case of a terrorist attack. Because of concerns that terrorists might use the potentially deadly bacterium, the government has stockpiled the vaccine. It has been widely tested on adults.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Mike Wiser Greg Gordon and Stephen Engelberg, FRONTLINE McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS PROPUBLICA
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department has called into question a key part of the FBI's case against Bruce Ivins, the Army scientist accused of mailing the anthrax-laced letters that killed five people and terrorized Congress a decade ago. Shortly after Ivins committed suicide in 2008, federal investigators announced that they had identified him as the mass murderer who sent the letters to members of Congress and news-media outlets. The case was circumstantial, with federal officials arguing that Ivins had the means, motive, and opportunity to make the deadly powder at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Md. Now, however, Justice Department lawyers have acknowledged in court papers that the sealed area in Ivins' lab - the so-called hot suite - did not contain the equipment needed to turn liquid anthrax into the refined powder that floated through congressional buildings and post offices in the fall of 2001.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Bruce Ivins, the Anthrax Attacks and America's Rush to War By David Willman Bantam Books. 448 pp. $27 Reviewed by Paul Jablow Mirage Man is something of an odd title for this book, but then again some of the best ones were taken. Like Ship of Fools or The Perfect Storm . It's a daunting task for a writer: Spin a captivating detective yarn where the outcome is known but unsatisfying, the villains are abundant and the heroes scarce. Willman, a prodigious researcher who covered this sordid tale for the Los Angeles Times, is definitely up to the task even if one conclusion seems a bit of a stretch.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
HAGERSTOWN, Md. - A court-ordered review found Wednesday that security screeners repeatedly failed to recognize signs of mental illness that should have prevented the man blamed for deadly 2001 anthrax attacks from working with the deadly spores at the Army's flagship biodefense laboratory A panel of experts said Bruce Ivins' long history of psychiatric problems did not reach the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases because he...
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