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Anthropology

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NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
Frederica de Laguna has devoted her entire professional life to communication. A pioneer scholar of tribes in Alaska, she has spent 57 years devising a mixture of words and gestures to make friends with her subjects. But when the American Anthropological Association presented the former Bryn Mawr College professor with a Distinguished Service Award in December, she was at a loss for words. "I couldn't figure out why they were giving it to me," said the anthropologist, who is 80. "I never thought they would think of me as a good teacher.
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | By William Raspberry
Sometimes I feel like a mere spectator in the arena where great ideas clash. Not a disinterested outsider; the clash may be over ideas that I find profoundly important. But the combatants put me off, make me reluctant to enlist on either side. Take the clash over religion in public life. I cannot align myself with those who advocate the excision of religion from public life, forbidding even government funding for tutorial services at the local Catholic school. But how can I not fear those who would enshrine creationism in the public schools, substitute the Bible for the legal code and make their religion the law of the land?
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Igor Kopytoff, 83, a University of Pennsylvania anthropology professor who traveled the world before settling in Philadelphia to live for most of his life, died Friday, Aug. 9, from complications related to Parkinson's disease at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Kopytoff was born in 1930 after his Russian parents fled to China to escape the Russian Revolution, said his daughter, Larissa Kopytoff. He and his brother were raised mostly in Shanghai, and through schooling, he learned to speak English and French but never Chinese, because he lived in a community of Russian refugees.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Karen Marie Dohm, 58, of Havertown, an anthropologist and educator, died of cancer Saturday, June 5, at Dunwoody Care Center in Newtown Square. Dr. Dohm was coordinator of master's programs in basic sciences at Thomas Jefferson University from 1997 until illness forced her to retire in 2006. She also taught anthropology and scientific writing at Jefferson. Dr. Dohm grew up in Pittsburgh and Miami and earned a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Florida. While earning a master's degree and doctorate in anthropology from Washington State University, she conducted archaeological research on the origins of pre-Anasazi cultures in Utah and Colorado.
NEWS
July 8, 1998
Edward Smith was misidentified on yesterday's Commentary Page. Smith is a member of the advisory board of the Jefferson Davis Presidential Library and is the director of the American studies program and a professor of anthropology at American University in Washington.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Sharer, 72, of Landenberg, an archaeologist and authority on Mayan history and culture, and an emeritus curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Thursday, Sept. 20, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Delaware. Mr. Sharer, a professor emeritus, spent 40 years as a professor of anthropology at Penn and conducted research in Central America for nearly five decades. He was the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of more than 20 books and monographs.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Rigby, 59, a Temple University anthropology professor who retired in June to return to the country where he'd done much of his research, died of malaria on Wednesday in Eldoret, Kenya. Mr. Rigby was born in India to Irish parents who were secondary-school educators all over the British Empire. He grew up in Zambia, received a bachelor's degree in Bantu languages from the University of Cape Town in South Africa in 1958, and earned a doctorate from Cambridge University in social anthropology.
NEWS
December 5, 1988
Admittedly it was 20-some years ago when we last encountered anthropology (Anthropology 101, Tues.-Thurs, 7:45 a.m., Mr. Taylor, 3 credits), but we seem to recall there was a heavy emphasis on the tribal subcultures of South Seas islands. Apparently a lot has changed in this field. Consider the work James Schaefer of the University of Minnesota described recently at the American Anthropological Association convention. After 10 years of research, Mr. Schaefer and some colleagues have determined that patrons of country and Western bars consume more alcohol than their counterparts in bars that feature hard rock.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dell Hathaway Hymes, 82, a linguist, an anthropologist, and a folklorist who was dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania for 12 years, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 13 at the Cedars Nursing Home in Charlottesville, Va. Dr. Hymes joined Penn as a professor of anthropology in 1965. He was appointed dean in 1975. He left in 1987 to became a professor of anthropology and English at the University of Virginia. At Penn, Dr. Hymes launched the educational linguistics program in the graduate school.
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NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Igor Kopytoff, 83, a University of Pennsylvania anthropology professor who traveled the world before settling in Philadelphia to live for most of his life, died Friday, Aug. 9, from complications related to Parkinson's disease at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Kopytoff was born in 1930 after his Russian parents fled to China to escape the Russian Revolution, said his daughter, Larissa Kopytoff. He and his brother were raised mostly in Shanghai, and through schooling, he learned to speak English and French but never Chinese, because he lived in a community of Russian refugees.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ward H. Goodenough, 94, a longtime University of Pennsylvania professor whose work helped shape anthropology, died Sunday, June 9, of organ failure at the Quadrangle in Haverford. "Transcending the triteness of the terms, he was a true renaissance man and a consummate gentleman," his family said in a statement. Along with his academic work, Dr. Goodenough composed music and wrote poetry. Born in Cambridge, Mass., he lived in England and Germany as a child while his father studied at the University of Oxford.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henrika "Riki" Kuklick, 70, of South Philadelphia, a retired professor who taught at the University of Pennsylvania for 32 years, died Sunday, May 12, of unknown causes at her home. A friend found her body; an autopsy was being conducted late Monday, according to the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office. Dr. Kuklick retired in 2012 as a professor in Penn's department of history and sociology of science, where she specialized in the history of sociology and anthropology, department chair Robert Aronowitz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
THE WORLD will soon come to an end. Everybody knows that by now. The Mayans predicted the coming cataclysm more than a thousand years ago: Dec. 21, 2012, or, at the latest, Dec. 23. It is strange, then, that "Maya: 2012 Lords of Time," the exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, runs through Jan. 13. Clearly, a major scheduling error has occurred. The Maya were an ancient civilization that flourished in what is now Central America and southern Mexico.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Sharer, 72, of Landenberg, an archaeologist and authority on Mayan history and culture, and an emeritus curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Thursday, Sept. 20, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Delaware. Mr. Sharer, a professor emeritus, spent 40 years as a professor of anthropology at Penn and conducted research in Central America for nearly five decades. He was the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of more than 20 books and monographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For those worried about an apocalypse supposedly predicted by the Maya calendar and coming at the end of the year 2012, there's very good news at a spectacular exhibition that opens in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology this weekend. That notion of the world's end is firmly debunked in "Maya 2012: Lords of Time. " So those stressed about what might happen come late December can exhale, thanks to the scholars involved in this fascinating study of the Maya culture - and their calendar.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
IF OCEANS boil next year and ancient gods start sucking human souls into the fiery heavens, only then will you wish you had heeded the words of former Phillies catcher Darren Daulton. "The Mayan calendar stops at Dec. 21, 2012 - the date the Mayans believed the world would end," Dutch supposedly told Sports Illustrated in 2006. "On that day, at 11:11 a.m. Greenwich Mean Time, those who are ready to ascend will vanish from this plane of existence, like the crew of the Enterprise in Star Trek.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gregory L. Possehl spent parts of his academic life on archaeological digs in South Asia, but he also paid attention to the West Philadelphia neighborhood of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. "One of the roles the University Museum plays is as a doorway for our neighbors to see what goes on at the University of Pennsylvania," Dr. Possehl explained in a 1985 Inquirer interview. Speaking of a Penn exhibit on the history of Buddhism meant in part to attract nonacademics, he noted: "This is an educational display that will be pretty, too, by the way. We don't mind being beautiful as long as we have our message.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Karen Marie Dohm, 58, of Havertown, an anthropologist and educator, died of cancer Saturday, June 5, at Dunwoody Care Center in Newtown Square. Dr. Dohm was coordinator of master's programs in basic sciences at Thomas Jefferson University from 1997 until illness forced her to retire in 2006. She also taught anthropology and scientific writing at Jefferson. Dr. Dohm grew up in Pittsburgh and Miami and earned a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Florida. While earning a master's degree and doctorate in anthropology from Washington State University, she conducted archaeological research on the origins of pre-Anasazi cultures in Utah and Colorado.
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