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Antibiotics

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LIVING
January 31, 1994 | By Ron Gasbarro, FOR THE INQUIRER
The antibiotics your doctor prescribes for you used to be relatively inexpensive. But with the introduction of some newer compounds, don't be surprised if you are spending anywhere from $50 to $100 to get your prescription filled. "Sometimes the cost of an antibiotic takes a customer's breath away," says Gary Renhardt, pharmacy director of Little Rock, Ark.-based Harvest Foods. "I have to admit, I've handed back more than a few prescriptions to customers who said they were going right home to call their doctor.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New medical guidelines urge doctors to stop routinely prescribing antibiotics for colds, sore throats, sinus problems and bronchitis since the drugs do no good for most respiratory illnesses. The guidelines for adults, announced today by a panel convened by the federal government, stem from a growing concern about the overuse of antibiotics. Experts say that overprescribing is fueling an epidemic of drug-resistant "superbugs. " "These guidelines should allow physicians to target their antibiotics to where they're likely to do good and avoid them where they're likely to do harm," said Dr. Richard Besser of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
LIVING
September 27, 1995 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This report contains information from the Associated Press, the Washington Post and the New York Post
It was just a weekend getaway to Cuba. But novelist Alice Walker and activist Angela Davis went there with a little something extra - $5 million worth of the antibiotic Ceclor for the Cuban Red Cross. The two were part of a small delegation from U.S.+Cuba Medical Project, which donates medical supplies to Cuba, forbidden under the U.S. embargo to buy drugs and equipment made in the United States. The drug was donated by Eli Lilly & Co. Fidel Castro said he was grateful for the medicine but added that he believed doctors prescribe too many antibiotics.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Dr. Keith Hamilton, For The Inquirer
Since penicillin was introduced in the 1940s, antibiotics have transformed the way we live, turning potentially perilous strep throats and scraped knees into minor annoyances. Now the effectiveness of antibiotics is being threatened by new forms of drug-resistant bacteria, "superbugs," that are immune to many, if not all, of the antibiotics we have to treat them. More than two million Americans develop antibiotic-resistant infections each year, and at least 23,000 die, concluded a report last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell is off to the Democratic convention and he took a nurse with him to treat his infected arm. The bacterial infection which kept Rendell in the hospital for most of the weekend was being treated with intravenous antibiotics, so visiting nurse Jeanne Aiken packed her bags and left with Rendell yesterday. Aiken will stay in the same hotel as Rendell and will clean and pack his swollen elbow and administer antibiotics three times a day. The mayor is wearing a Hickman catheter, a device for injecting intravenous fluids outside hospital settings, and is expected to continue on antibiotics at least until the end of the week.
LIVING
May 3, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Antibiotics, the miracle drugs of the 20th century, are quickly losing their effectiveness, and it's partly parents' fault. That is the conclusion of three area doctors whose new book, Breaking the Antibiotic Habit, A Parent's Guide to Coughs, Colds, Ear Infections, and Sore Throats, has just hit the stores. Of course, it's the doctors who write prescriptions, but they are often pressured by parents who won't be satisfied until they can give something to their ailing children.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the summer of 1986, Michael Zasloff was watching a frog swimming in a murky laboratory aquarium when he noticed that a surgical cut in the animal's belly was healing splendidly - even though it was surrounded by bacteria- infested water. "It was ridiculous," Zasloff said Friday as he sat in his new office at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Why wasn't that frog horribly infected? What was protecting it?" That casual observation led Zasloff, 42, to the discovery of a whole new "superfamily" of natural antibiotics found in frog's skin that are effective against bacteria, fungi, parasites and some viruses.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration last week announced a plan to phase out the use of antibiotics to promote weight gain in livestock - a widespread practice thought to have contributed to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. The agency is asking antibiotics manufacturers to indicate on their labels that the drugs are intended only for the treatment or prevention of disease. Traditionally, such drugs have been administered to also make animals grow faster and improve "feed efficiency," meaning they need less food to gain the same amount of weight.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A local unit of drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline has a central role in a $200 million public-private project announced Wednesday to develop antibiotics against biological terrorism and treat drug-resistant infections in health-care settings around the world. The U.S. government will pay Glaxo $40 million in the first 18 months, and, if the project is on track, $160 million more over five years. Glaxo will contribute more of its own money to the project. Glaxo is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies that still works on antibiotics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Andrew F. Read The doctor tried antibiotic after antibiotic, but the bacteria in the woman's body continued to proliferate. With only two drugs left, the doctor asked for my advice. An evolutionary biologist collaborating with the physician to study antibiotic resistance, I suggested he use both drugs simultaneously. I reasoned that since the two drugs had different modes of action, more mutations would be required for the bacteria to generate resistance to both drugs. In truth, we had no idea what to do, and there wasn't enough justification to go with my theory.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | Diane Robinson, FOR THE INQUIRER
Q: How can I avoid getting a yeast infection when I have to take antibiotics? A: Most women will experience a yeast infection at some point in their lives. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 75 percent of all adult women have had at least one such infection. A healthy vagina is naturally acidic and contains helpful bacteria to fend off infections and maintain a normal pH level. Oftentimes, taking an antibiotic can interfere with this normal balance.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Although she needed extra calories, Mingo the malnourished stray could swallow only one piece of kibble at a time after being rescued from the streets of Philadelphia's Frankford section two summers ago. Mingo would also hack after drinking, and her bark became raspy. On antibiotics for what seemed like a routine case of kennel cough, the wire-haired, brindle terrier was plucked from the city shelter by the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), which finds homes for cats and dogs that appear particularly adoptable.
NEWS
July 24, 2015
ISSUE | IRAN NUKE DEAL In region teeming with violence, hope Although it was not unexpected, the fierce rejection of the nuclear agreement by Israel's prime minister and almost all Republican senators and presidential candidates is disturbing ("Obama's reckless gamble," July 16). While much of the Middle East is a sea of uncontrollable violence, the deal is one example of careful negotiation and compromise. To be sure, this is no grand bargain. It was never intended to change Iranian support of terrorist groups.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Linwood R. Haith Jr., For The Inquirer
A 43-year-old woman came to a hospital complaining of abdominal pain. She was in poor health generally, with serious kidney disease, insulin-dependent diabetes, vascular disease, and obesity. She also had stomach ulcers, but the pain that brought her to the hospital was like nothing she'd ever experienced. She had been taking antibiotics for a urinary tract infection and developed blisters, which suggested an allergic reaction. Hospital staff quickly found her to be in severe septic shock.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Thomas Klein, M.D., For The Inquirer
John, 52, had more infections than anyone else I had ever seen in the 30 years I've been practicing allergy and clinical immunology. At 5-foot-8 and 170 pounds, he didn't look sickly. He dressed in casual clothes and looked relaxed. He had an engaging smile and a firm handshake, and he seemed fit. He looked like he could run a 5K race easily. But after speaking with him for five minutes, I knew something was terribly wrong. At his first visit, John mentioned that he suffered from three to four episodes of sinusitis each year.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Dr. William C. Meyers, For The Inquirer
In his sixth year in the NBA, Kyle Lowry - the Villanova University standout who was drafted after his sophomore year, in 2006 - finally had the chance to play regularly. It was now March 2012, and he was a point guard with the Houston Rockets. He knew he could be a star. But that darn pain in his belly was such a distraction. For six months, the tormenting pain below his belly button had shifted from one side to the other. Like many professional athletes, he played through it. Somehow, he could no longer keep the nagging pain out his mind.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. dove deeper into the antibiotic drug market Monday when it agreed to buy Cubist Pharmaceuticals for $9.5 billion, including debt. The deal would pay Cubist stockholders $102 per share in cash, which Merck calculates is a 35 percent premium to Cubist's average closing price in the preceding five trading days. The agreement includes $8.4 billion for the shares and assumption of about $1.1 billion in company debt. Merck is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and has large facilities in Upper Gwynedd and West Point, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antibiotics are an odd category of pharmaceuticals, and Austria-based Nabriva Therapeutics is opening a Philadelphia-area office in hopes of finding a niche in that group. Some antibiotics are used only in humans, some only in animals, but some are used in both. Most adults have come to accept antibiotics so readily that the major problem is overuse. And overuse can mean developing resistance to medicine that used to be very effective. That has prompted efforts to control their use. The New York Times reported Wednesday that the chicken producer Perdue will stop giving antibiotics to its hatching chicks because they will eventually be eaten by humans, thereby contributing to the general problem of antibiotic resistance in humans.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just so you know, this story is not for the squeamish. It's about the therapeutic power of poop, a concept that is, we admit, both repulsive and fascinating. Specifically, it's about using one person's "donation" to cure another's Clostridium difficile , a potentially fatal bacterial infection that is growing more common and virulent. The beneficial bacteria from a healthy person's gut can subdue the bad germs growing like crazy in a sick one's digestive system, even if many rounds of expensive antibiotics have failed.
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