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Antidepressants

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NEWS
February 14, 2004 | By Chris Adams and Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As U.S. regulators debate whether a popular class of antidepressant drugs causes suicidal behavior in children, their review is also raising questions about whether the drugs are effective. The use of antidepressants to treat depression or other conditions, such as attention-deficit disorder, in children is growing rapidly even though there are few credible studies showing that they work in children. The drugs under review by the Food and Drug Administration include such blockbusters as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft as well as other antidepressants.
NEWS
September 25, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beth O'Connor and her 8-year-old son, Jarrett, listened carefully as his psychiatrist explained the bad news about antidepressants such as the one he takes for anxiety. Studies have found an increased risk of suicidal behavior among a small percentage of children taking the drugs, Sarosh Khalid-Khan told them. The Food and Drug Administration is considering giving their parents an especially strong warning. O'Connor, of South Philadelphia, already knew that. Jarrett's father had called in a panic after reading about the dangers of the drugs.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1998 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Rabinovich was in a quandary over how to treat his psychiatric patient, the 3-year-old daughter of a drug addict. The child's grandmother was preparing to give her over to foster care because the girl had become uncontrollable - a symptom of the neglect she had experienced. Rabinovich weighed his options carefully and decided to give the child an antidepressant along with the stimulant Ritalin. The unusual treatment worked. The child calmed down and has continued to live with her grandmother for the last three years.
NEWS
September 10, 2004 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Drugmakers and federal regulators alike came under sharp, bipartisan criticism yesterday from members of Congress for failing to promptly disclose study results suggesting that antidepressant drugs might not work in children and might in some cases trigger suicidal thinking. Lawmakers, in a rare display of political consensus, said they would push the Food and Drug Administration and the drug industry to make more information public about clinical trials of antidepressants. "What is troubling ... is that millions of antidepressant prescriptions are written for depressed kids, when the facts show that six of the seven anti-depressants tested in pediatric trials did not show efficacy in kids," said Rep. Greg Walden (R., Ore.)
NEWS
August 21, 2004 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children and adolescents being treated with certain antidepressants may be at increased risk of suicidal behavior, the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday, setting the stage for tougher warning labels on the drugs. The agency, releasing new analyses of 25 studies of 4,250 young psychiatric patients nationwide, said children and teens being treated with antidepressants appear nearly twice as likely to attempt suicide, think about it, or make suicidal preparations. None of the young people in the mostly industry-sponsored studies committed suicide.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I recently saw my eye doctor because I suddenly became very sensitive to light. He said that it was caused by a condition called "Adie's pupil. " My right pupil is much larger than my left and it won't get smaller in bright light. Otherwise, I see fine. He gave me eye drops, but didn't really know what caused it. Is it curable? Answer: Adie's pupil is a condition likely from a viral infection affecting the nerve fibers that constrict the pupil in bright light.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
Studies find a pair of reasons to start the school day later When schools start later to allow teenagers more time in bed, there may be a dual benefit: better performance in the classroom and behind the wheel. These results were reported in two studies in last month's Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. In one study, researchers found the rate of teenage auto accidents was much higher in one Virginia city than in a neighboring community where school started about an hour and a quarter later.
NEWS
October 4, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These days, when the parent of a depressed child asks Ellen Sholevar which treatment is best, she doesn't know what to say. And she's a child and adolescent psychiatrist. "At this point, we don't have science to guide us," said Sholevar, who works at Temple University Hospital. "It puts all of us in a tough situation. " Sixteen years after the approval of Prozac - the first of a new generation of antidepressants - doctors who treat kids still have many questions: Which drug should they use?
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Evolutionary psychologist Paul Andrews has an unusual take on depression and antidepressants. Andrews, an assistant professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, thinks depression, miserable as it is, serves a positive role, much as fever does in fighting infection. He argues that the lethargy, lack of appetite, sleeplessness, and rumination that accompany depression help people focus on and ultimately solve their problems. "Depressed mood states seem to promote an analytical processing style," Andrews said, that helps people break complex problems into smaller bites.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By George Ball A few years back I witnessed an unforgettable sight. Having just led some visitors around Burpee's Fordhook Farm floral display gardens, I noticed one man standing outside the garden, rocking back and forth, his eyes closed. Concerned, I asked him if everything was OK. "I . . . am . . . happy," he replied simply, lost in rapture. In his honor, we have named it the "Happiness Garden. " I mention this episode because our country is right now in the midst of an epidemic of unhappiness.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can antidepressants help ward off Alzheimer's disease? That's the tantalizing question raised by new research from a University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist. She's says it's way too early to answer it. "I am not advocating that people take [antidepressants] at this point in time for anything other than depression," said Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry, radiology, and neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress. Her latest work explored the link between amyloid beta, one of the hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease, and the antidepressant citalopram (Celexa)
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By George Ball A few years back I witnessed an unforgettable sight. Having just led some visitors around Burpee's Fordhook Farm floral display gardens, I noticed one man standing outside the garden, rocking back and forth, his eyes closed. Concerned, I asked him if everything was OK. "I . . . am . . . happy," he replied simply, lost in rapture. In his honor, we have named it the "Happiness Garden. " I mention this episode because our country is right now in the midst of an epidemic of unhappiness.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
In Side Effects , the tricky psychological thriller starring Rooney Mara as a depressed and quite possibly suicidal New Yorker, Jude Law shows up as Dr. Jonathan Banks, Mara's character's psychiatrist. He meets her after a car accident brings her to the hospital, and then takes her on as a patient. He prescribes antidepressants, and then other antidepressants, and then a new drug, still in clinical trials. The whole world of SSRI's - Celexa, Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft (has anyone done a study on why all the x' s and z' s?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Do you think I have to disclose to my friends, relatives, dates, etc., that I'm on antidepressants? It's likely to change my relationships in some ways (I hope for the better), so I feel these people deserve an explanation, but I'm afraid I'm going to feel judged, whether or not anyone is actually judging me. What do you think? Answer: Friends, no, relatives, no, dates, no ... until you get to the point where you think things are on a serious, committed path.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Tanning faces backlash Teenage girls risking deadly melanoma for a year-round tan have helped spur a global backlash against the tanning-bed industry. Health officials from Brasilia to Sydney are banning tanning salons amid evidence that they cause malignant lesions. Tanning-bed use causes all three types of skin cancer, especially for those under age 25, a study from the University of California, San Francisco, said. Doctors say the work in the British Medical Journal should prompt tougher warnings on ultraviolet radiation-emitting tanning machines, which support $5 billion in U.S. annual economic activity.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Evolutionary psychologist Paul Andrews has an unusual take on depression and antidepressants. Andrews, an assistant professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, thinks depression, miserable as it is, serves a positive role, much as fever does in fighting infection. He argues that the lethargy, lack of appetite, sleeplessness, and rumination that accompany depression help people focus on and ultimately solve their problems. "Depressed mood states seem to promote an analytical processing style," Andrews said, that helps people break complex problems into smaller bites.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I recently saw my eye doctor because I suddenly became very sensitive to light. He said that it was caused by a condition called "Adie's pupil. " My right pupil is much larger than my left and it won't get smaller in bright light. Otherwise, I see fine. He gave me eye drops, but didn't really know what caused it. Is it curable? Answer: Adie's pupil is a condition likely from a viral infection affecting the nerve fibers that constrict the pupil in bright light.
NEWS
April 9, 2008 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals panel in Philadelphia backed the pharmaceutical industry's arguments yesterday that it should be insulated from certain lawsuits. The 2-1 opinion said drugmakers could not be blamed for the suicides of two people on antidepressants whose families claimed that the drug's warning labels were not strong enough. While narrowly written, the decision was a clear victory for drugmakers and Bush administration officials, who want scientists at the Food and Drug Administration, not lay juries, deciding what drug labels should say. Lawyers for the plaintiffs countered that the FDA was outgunned and poorly funded at best and that lawsuits represented an important check on the system and a last attempt for injured victims to get redress.
NEWS
May 2, 2006 | By Ronald W. Dworkin
Doctors now view everyday unhappiness and clinical depression as lying on a continuum, with biochemistry accounting for the whole range of human moods, from pathological to normal variants. Whether a patient suffers from clinical depression or just everyday unhappiness is immaterial because neurotransmitter imbalance is thought to be the cause of both. In both conditions, antidepressants are the treatment of choice. Statistics affirm the new attitudes. In the United States, doctors treat both major and minor depression with medication at roughly the same rate, even as the symptoms of minor depression merge into everyday unhappiness.
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