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Antioxidants

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NEWS
June 26, 2006 | By Erika Engelhaupt FOR THE INQUIRER
First it was red wine. Then green tea. Now pomegranate juice is making the rounds as the latest good-for-you drink. Experts say it may help lower blood pressure and even fight certain cancers, although the research is still preliminary. But beware those extra calories if you're swilling a daily dose. The near blood-red drink is cropping up all over, from chic cocktail lounges to humble neighborhood delis. Sales of refrigerated pomegranate juice soared from zero in 2001 to more than $63 million in 2005, according to A.C. Nielsen, the market research firm.
LIVING
August 11, 1997 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Norma Fisher isn't looking for the fountain of youth in her bowl of blueberries. "I don't think healthy when I eat them," said Fisher, 76, of Pemberton, Burlington County. "I eat them because I like them. . . . They're firm, soft, crisp, not too sweet. And they don't get messy. " Not that Fisher minds a little dirt under her nails; she rummages through blueberry bushes herself to feed her habit. In season, she eats about a pint a day. During the winter, she eats them with cereal, pouring milk over frozen berries to make "snowballs.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I have inexpensive vinyl flooring in two bathrooms in my house. The house is now about 11 years old and I am having a problem trying to clean the floors - some of the area has turned yellow. I have tried several types of floor cleaners. I am seeking a solution to this problem. Answer: I looked on the Armstrong website for an answer, and rubber-backed bath mats or rugs might be the cause: Chemical compounds, referred to as antioxidants, are formulated into rubber materials to extend the life of the rubber and prevent brittleness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2007 | McClatchy Newspapers
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Deep purple eggplant, plums and blackberries. So elegant and regal in their coloring. Each is plentiful in the produce aisle these days, and each offers a rich source of health-producing phytochemicals, or nutrients found in specific foods because of their hue. Deep purple and bluish foods are believed to lower the risk of some cancers, to improve urinary tract health and memory function and to help with the overall aging process....
FOOD
September 30, 2010
A nice snack KIND, the folks that focus on healthy snacking, have added a line of fruit and nut bars with a nutritional boost. Try the dark chocolate cherry cashew with antioxidants; pomegranate blueberry pistachio with antioxidants; or one that could become positively addictive: peanut butter dark chocolate with protein. All are gluten-free.   Best buy From Bialetti, the Italian company that brought us those cute little expresso pots, comes an impressive new line of cookware: Aeternum.
NEWS
April 12, 2000
Mom was right. Eat your fruits and vegetables and lay off the pills. That's the message this week from the National Academy of Sciences, which announced that studies so far have failed to show that megadoses of antioxidant vitamins help reduce chances of getting cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's or any of the myriad diseases that plague the middle-aged and elderly. (Antioxidants are nutrients that neutralize "free radicals," naturally produced chemicals that can damage the body by oxidizing cells.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | Daily News wire services
UNITED NATIONS IRAN ASSAILED FOR RIGHTS ABUSES A U.N. committee yesterday harshly criticized Iran for its continued high number of executions and tortures, its discrimination against religious minorities and women and its capricious judicial system. The resolution was adopted by a vote of 68-23 with 56 abstentions. A decision by the commmittee, which includes all U.N. members, guarantees a similar outcome in the full assembly next week. The document also expressed grave concern at "continuing threats" to the life of writer Salman Rushdie, who lives in Britain, and those associated with the publication and translation of his novel "The Satanic Verses.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ARREST THOSE FREE RADICALS. If you're still reeling from last month's news that margarine's bad for you, too, you'll be happy to hear that something's still good to eat, even if it's a mouthful to pronounce. The latest buzz in nutrition circles is a class of nutrients called "antioxidants" - notably vitamin C, vitamin E and beta carotene - that may help defend your body against cancer, heart disease and even cataracts by battling molecular baddies called "free radicals. " If you want the full scoop, a new paperback called "The Antioxidant Pocket Counter" has all the details.
FOOD
June 3, 1998 | by Linda Carol Cherken, For the Daily News
You've heard the bit about the apple - you know, how an apple a day keeps the doctor at bay (or some such broad, feel-good generalization). But medical studies are showing that along with fruits, grains and veggies, vitamins are playing a more important role than ever in keeping us fit. No one's disputing that if you eat a well-balanced diet, you'll probably be just fine, but many health-care professionals today believe you'll be a lot "finer" if...
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
You can get too much of some good things, including Vitamins C and E, the federal government's watchdog for nutritional standards said yesterday. For the first time, the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences, set limits on daily consumption of Vitamins C and E in an effort to reduce the risk of harmful side effects from overuse. While the institute's scientists found that extremely large doses of Vitamins C and E could cause health problems, they also called for increasing the recommended daily dosages for both.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 2012
IN THE REGION Exide to cut 150 jobs Reading battery maker Exide Technologies said it plans to cut 150 jobs at its Reading lead recycling operation. In a statement, Exide Americas president Paul Hirt blamed the high cost of complying with environmental laws regulating the handling of toxic lead, and the volatile price of lead. The company will keep operating lead recycling centers in California, Missouri and Indiana. About 25 workers will remain on the site, recycling plastic.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I have inexpensive vinyl flooring in two bathrooms in my house. The house is now about 11 years old and I am having a problem trying to clean the floors - some of the area has turned yellow. I have tried several types of floor cleaners. I am seeking a solution to this problem. Answer: I looked on the Armstrong website for an answer, and rubber-backed bath mats or rugs might be the cause: Chemical compounds, referred to as antioxidants, are formulated into rubber materials to extend the life of the rubber and prevent brittleness.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
A nice snack KIND, the folks that focus on healthy snacking, have added a line of fruit and nut bars with a nutritional boost. Try the dark chocolate cherry cashew with antioxidants; pomegranate blueberry pistachio with antioxidants; or one that could become positively addictive: peanut butter dark chocolate with protein. All are gluten-free.   Best buy From Bialetti, the Italian company that brought us those cute little expresso pots, comes an impressive new line of cookware: Aeternum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010
MOTHER'S DAY is our national commemoration of mothers and their contributions. Happy belated Mother's Day to all the moms out there who celebrated their day last Sunday. And I would like to remind you that the best way we can be of service to our families is by taking good care of ourselves. This column serves as a gentle reminder for moms of my seven steps to increasing wellness, health and happiness. Your health is your wealth, and a happy, healthy you is the best gift you can give your family.
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
FOOD
January 17, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
Dried fruit in the pantry is always money in the bank, but the qualities of shriveled apricots, raisins, cherries and their kin seem even more valuable in the winter months. I mean, aside from booze-mummified fruitcake made when the Beatles were on stage. It is now that nuggets of desiccated fruit pop up more frequently in all manner of dishes. They add color and sweetness to desserts, muffins and quick breads. In savory recipes, dried fruit does that and more: It provides depth of flavor by balancing acidity, spiciness and saltiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2007 | McClatchy Newspapers
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Deep purple eggplant, plums and blackberries. So elegant and regal in their coloring. Each is plentiful in the produce aisle these days, and each offers a rich source of health-producing phytochemicals, or nutrients found in specific foods because of their hue. Deep purple and bluish foods are believed to lower the risk of some cancers, to improve urinary tract health and memory function and to help with the overall aging process....
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the centuries, coffee has been cursed for making soldiers undependable, women infertile, peasants rebellious, and worse. In England in 1674, for example, the anonymous authors of the Women's Petition Against Coffee complained that they were suffering in the bedroom because men were constantly in coffeehouses, slurping that "nauseous Puddle-water": "That Newfangled, Abominable, Heathenish Liquor called COFFEE ... has ... Eunucht our...
NEWS
June 26, 2006 | By Erika Engelhaupt FOR THE INQUIRER
First it was red wine. Then green tea. Now pomegranate juice is making the rounds as the latest good-for-you drink. Experts say it may help lower blood pressure and even fight certain cancers, although the research is still preliminary. But beware those extra calories if you're swilling a daily dose. The near blood-red drink is cropping up all over, from chic cocktail lounges to humble neighborhood delis. Sales of refrigerated pomegranate juice soared from zero in 2001 to more than $63 million in 2005, according to A.C. Nielsen, the market research firm.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Foods rich in Vitamin E, such as leafy green vegetables, whole grains, nuts and eggs, may lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to two studies released yesterday. The studies examined the connection between antioxidants, including Vitamins E and C, and Alzheimer's. Both studies found strong effects from Vitamin E, and one also found that a diet rich in Vitamin C appeared to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's. Neither study found similar effects from vitamin pills. The studies were published in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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