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Antipsychotic

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NEWS
April 30, 1991 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia researchers have won a major federal grant for a five-year study of clozapine, a new drug that is said to work miracles with schizophrenic patients who fail to respond to all other medications. The $1 million grant, announced yesterday, will pair researchers from the Medical College of Pennsylvania/Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute with patients at Haverford State Hospital. The costly drug will be made available to 108 Haverford patients; only 23 benefit from it now. The study also is expected to attract other research projects and enhance the hospital's ability to recruit professional staff.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda and Gloria A. Hoffner, FOR THE INQUIRER
Eight teenagers, including students at Haverford Senior High School, became ill over two days this week after swallowing a strong antipsychotic drug that they mistakenly believed was Valium, Haverford police said yesterday. The eight, ranging in age from 16 to 18, suffered convulsions and were taken to Bryn Mawr and Mercy Haverford Hospitals Thursday night and yesterday. All but one were treated and released. Haverford police said one of the teenagers told them he bought 32 blue pills Wednesday at 69th and Market Streets in Upper Darby from an unidentified man. He told police he believed they were Valium, a sedative often prescribed for insomnia and anxiety.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly after new antipsychotic drugs came on the market in the late 1990s, the Food and Drug Administration started to worry that they might trigger diabetes in some patients. So in 2000, the FDA asked AstraZeneca P.L.C. and other pharmaceutical companies to share data on cases of new-onset diabetes and related illnesses in patients taking the drugs. London-based AstraZeneca, which has U.S. headquarters in Wilmington, told the FDA that patients and doctors had reported 12 new cases of diabetes and five cases of related illnesses among the 623,000 who had taken its antipsychotic drug Seroquel.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C. repeatedly minimized links between its antipsychotic drug Seroquel and weight gain and "buried" negative data suggesting such a connection, according to documents released yesterday. The documents were released in Orlando, Fla., after months of negotiations between AstraZeneca and lawyers for thousands of people who say that taking Seroquel caused them to develop diabetes. A federal judge last month dismissed the first two of those personal-injury suits, but plaintiffs' lawyers and Bloomberg News argued that documents in the case should be unsealed.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Does the world have the right to know about negative studies on AstraZeneca's potent antipsychotic drug Seroquel? Or whether company representatives promoted the drug for unapproved uses? And what about details of sexual relationships between Wayne Macfadden, AstraZeneca's former U.S. medical director for Seroquel, and two women who researched and wrote papers supporting the drug's safety and efficacy? A federal judge in Orlando may answer those questions as soon as today in a case stemming from personal-injury claims by 15,000 people that Seroquel triggered weight gain, diabetes, and other health problems.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge said Thursday that Johnson & Johnson chief executive officer Alex Gorsky cannot be called as a trial witness by lawyers for a 17-year-old boy whose family sued the company because he grew breasts after taking Risperdal, an antipsychotic drug made by J&J. In a big victory for the health-care giant, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Arnold New agreed to the request by J&J defense lawyers to quash the subpoena from the boy's...
BUSINESS
September 17, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Texas, Allen Jones determined that state employees were getting kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies, and his efforts resulted in his being named Whistle-blower of the Year and awarded about $20 million of the state's $158 million settlement. In Pennsylvania, where Jones was a commonwealth-paid investigator, he and his information were dismissed - twice, almost a decade apart. Jones had discovered malfeasance that was similar in both states, with the drug companies wanting state officials to help push higher-priced antipsychotic drugs to foster children, among other wards of the state, through taxpayer-funded Medicaid programs.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a City Hall courtroom this week, Pennsylvania is trying to convince a Philadelphia jury that it was duped into overpaying $160 million for the antipsychotic drug Risperdal. The state, which provided the drug to the poor and elderly, wants to be reimbursed by Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc., a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, maker of Risperdal. Pennsylvania contends that Janssen falsely claimed Risperdal was safer and more effective than similar but less expensive antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol, also known as Haldol.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2008 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to a research center run by an influential child psychiatrist explicitly to generate data to help expand sales of the company's antipsychotic drug Risperdal in children, according to court documents. The documents shed new light on Johnson & Johnson's close relationship with Joseph Biederman, a Harvard University psychiatrist at the center of a controversy involving the dramatic increase in antipsychotic drugs, including Risperdal, prescribed for children, often for unapproved uses.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Conrad Wall, 28, remembers spending months in isolation, "barely lucid," as a patient at Mayview State Hospital near Pittsburgh in 1987. He suffered from hallucinations and delusions, but the drugs that might have controlled those symptoms were off-limits for Wall. They made him deathly sick. Then, Wall agreed to take an experimental drug known as clozapine. Considered a breakthrough in the treatment of schizophrenia, the drug became commercially available in the United States just last month.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a fifth of Pennsylvania's foster children in 2012 were taking antipsychotics, powerful medications that can cause serious metabolic side effects, including rapid weight gain and diabetes. Yet most of them had not been found to have conditions proven to respond to such drugs, a study released Tuesday found. While the use of psychiatric drugs has declined slightly among Pennsylvania children on Medicaid, the study found that it remains high, especially among foster children.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge said Thursday that Johnson & Johnson chief executive officer Alex Gorsky cannot be called as a trial witness by lawyers for a 17-year-old boy whose family sued the company because he grew breasts after taking Risperdal, an antipsychotic drug made by J&J. In a big victory for the health-care giant, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Arnold New agreed to the request by J&J defense lawyers to quash the subpoena from the boy's...
BUSINESS
September 17, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Texas, Allen Jones determined that state employees were getting kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies, and his efforts resulted in his being named Whistle-blower of the Year and awarded about $20 million of the state's $158 million settlement. In Pennsylvania, where Jones was a commonwealth-paid investigator, he and his information were dismissed - twice, almost a decade apart. Jones had discovered malfeasance that was similar in both states, with the drug companies wanting state officials to help push higher-priced antipsychotic drugs to foster children, among other wards of the state, through taxpayer-funded Medicaid programs.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned about "suspicions" of overprescribing antipsychotic drugs, the Pentagon took steps in the last few weeks to limit the use of those powerful medicines to treat the growing legion of war fighters suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. For Stan and Shirley White, the limits can't go into effect soon enough because, in their case, it's already too late. The retired educators' youngest son, Andrew, was an Eagle scout, a baseball player, and an honor student in high school near the family home in Cross Lanes, W.Va.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | David Sell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON - Fearing an "epidemic" of death and defects from the illegal use and improper prescribing of painkilling and antipsychotic drugs, senators Thursday pressed a panel of doctors and health-care officials about how to stop the problem. "It is tragic, it is sad, it is needless, it is fraudulent, it is horrible," said Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D.,W.Va), chairman of the Finance subcommittee on health. "And it is costing so much money that could be spent elsewhere. " The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used the term epidemic in the fall in reporting that deaths from overdoses of painkillers had more than tripled in the last decade and surpassed heroin and cocaine deaths combined.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
AstraZeneca P.L.C. will pay $198 million to settle 17,500 U.S. lawsuits that alleged its top-selling antipsychotic drug Seroquel caused diabetes, the company announced Monday. The settlement, which was part of a court-ordered mediation, would resolve the bulk of more than 25,000 lawsuits against the company over Seroquel. "While the terms remain confidential and are subject to nonmonetary agreements, we believe it was in the best interest of the company to explore resolving these cases through the mediation process," Tony Jewell, AstraZeneca's spokesman, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a City Hall courtroom this week, Pennsylvania is trying to convince a Philadelphia jury that it was duped into overpaying $160 million for the antipsychotic drug Risperdal. The state, which provided the drug to the poor and elderly, wants to be reimbursed by Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc., a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, maker of Risperdal. Pennsylvania contends that Janssen falsely claimed Risperdal was safer and more effective than similar but less expensive antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol, also known as Haldol.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2010 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia law firm yesterday said it filed 10 lawsuits on behalf of boys and young men who developed serious side effects - including the growth of breasts - while taking the antipsychotic medications Risperdal and Invega. The suits were filed in Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Lawyer Stephen Sheller said he expected to file an additional 20 to 30 similar cases in Philadelphia in the next two months. His firm also has 10 cases involving boys who took Risperdal and another medication pending in New Jersey.
NEWS
July 7, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Wiggins believes a powerful antipsychotic medication helped save his wife, Kathye. Helen Shields believes one of these drugs helped kill her mother, Helen Marciniszyn. Two families, two drugs, two stories that capture the extremes of a debate about using these medicines to treat the diseases of aging when there are no other effective alternatives. Kathye Wiggins took Johnson & Johnson's Risperdal. Marciniszyn took AstraZeneca's Seroquel. Both drugs are atypical antipsychotics, a category of psychotropic drugs that also includes Zyprexa from Eli Lilly & Co., Abilify by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., and Pfizer Inc.'s Geodon.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A government panel opened the door a crack yesterday toward allowing AstraZeneca P.L.C. to sell its Seroquel XR more widely, after an emotional meeting that included stories from two families who say their loved ones died after taking the powerful antipsychotic. The Food and Drug Administration advisory committee recommended the agency approve Seroquel XR for use as an additional therapy in patients suffering from depression who do not respond adequately to their current medications.
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