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Antiques Roadshow

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NEWS
August 4, 2006
An event popular among collectors - the Public Broadcasting Service's Antiques Roadshow - is scheduled to stop over at the Convention Center in Philadelphia tomorrow. At Roadshow events, appraisers value objects brought in by members of the public. According to a PBS spokeswoman, 20,000 people applied for the 6,000 tickets available, and all tickets were distributed through a lottery. No tickets will be available at the door. PBS expects to air the program some time early next year.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
WENDELL D. GARRETT, a historian and authority on American decorative arts who was widely known for his appearances as an appraiser on the long-running PBS series "Antiques Roadshow," has died. He was 83. Garrett died Nov. 14 of natural causes at a hospice facility in Williston, Vt., where he had moved recently from Manhattan. His former wife, Elisabeth Garrett Widmer, confirmed his death Monday. Known for his broad expertise, courtly manner and delight in sharing knowledge, Garrett appeared on every season of the American version of "Antiques Roadshow" since its launch in 1997.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two military antiques experts, who were dropped from the Antiques Roadshow television program last year after producers said they faked an on-air appraisal, were charged with fraud yesterday by a federal grand jury. Charged are Russell Pritchard 3d of Bryn Mawr, a nationally known expert on antique ordnance, and fellow expert and business partner George Juno, of Allentown. The charges state that the pair staged two phony appraisals taped in 1996 for the popular PBS program. The indictment also accuses them of defrauding two owners of Civil War artifacts by appraising the items for far less than they were worth, and then reselling them for much more.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An expert on military antiques and weapons yesterday admitted staging two appraisals on the popular Antiques Roadshow program to boost his reputation through national television exposure. George Juno pleaded guilty in federal court to one count each of mail fraud and wire fraud and two counts of lying while testifying under oath in a federal court deposition. Juno, 40, of Allentown, also agreed to work with prosecutors and will become the government's key witness in the trial of codefendant Russell Pritchard 3d, who with Juno ran a Bryn Mawr-based antique-ordnance appraisal service.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | Karla Klein Albertson, For the Inquirer
Collecting travel posters is as much about historical evaluation as it is about aesthetic appreciation. Certainly, the vivid colors and intricate designs make these posters visual masterpieces and a focal point for any room. But if you were at the Olympic Winter Games in Grenoble or honeymooned in Hawaii, posters featuring those places will ring more bells when you find them in the marketplace. There are some great examples that boost Pennsylvania - especially Philadelphia - on paper: The Philadelphia Sesquicentennial International Exposition in 1926 celebrated 150 years of American independence with a poster of the Liberty Bell against the American flag, "a very strong image," says Nicholas Lowry, who appraises posters for PBS's Antiques Roadshow and is the president of Swann Galleries in New York City.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The toy taxi had sat for years on the den shelf in Bob and Jean Craig's Wayne home. Now here it was on a table at an Audubon retirement community, the focus of seniors eager to know its value. "The condition is really quite good," said antiques expert Jeffrey Henkel, picking it up for a close look. "There are a few scratches, but as a tintype toy with printing, in extraordinary condition, I would say the auction value would be $2,000 to $3,000. " "Ahh," breathed the 100 seniors who packed a recreation room at Shannondell at Valley Forge yesterday.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Used to be we knew spring had sprung when that red, red robin came bob, bob, bobbing along. Now the passage into the season for Eastern Pennsylvanian antiquers is heralded by the pounding of tent pegs at the Renninger's showgrounds in Kutztown. That signals commencement of the annual Renninger's Extravaganza, one of the biggest collectible shows in America. More than 1,200 dealers from 42 states will set up tents or squeeze into roofed pavilions for the three-day event, which opens to the public tomorrow.
NEWS
December 21, 2007 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former Main Line antiques dealer who staged fake appraisals on Antiques Roadshow - and pleaded guilty to theft and fraud charges - is scheduled to be arraigned next week on theft charges in Bucks County and is now a fugitive. Russell Pritchard III of Beach Haven, N.J., is facing 140 counts of theft and receiving stolen property. He is accused of taking about $40,000 in antiques from a Bucks County woman with a promise to auction them. "She has never seen a dime," said David Zellis, Bucks County's first assistant district attorney.
NEWS
June 9, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tiger maple desk was a fake. Leigh Keno, one of the blond and bespectacled twins of Antiques Roadshow appraiser fame, knew it immediately, pointing out under his breath how pieces of 18th-century wood had been put together in an act of - yes, you may gasp - deception. Also in on his conclusion were John Hays, the erudite appraiser from Christie's; Keno brother Leslie; and the debonair Wendell Garrett, another Roadshow rock star, smiling conspiratorially in his wheelchair.
NEWS
August 6, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lynne and Richard Little of West Chester knew they had something of interest when Antiques Roadshow called last week and asked to pick up their tall chest of drawers to feature on yesterday's taping at the Convention Center. But they had no idea it would be the little black walnut spice cabinet filled with birds' eggs they carried through the streets of Philadelphia in a red Radio Flyer wagon that would get the hearts of the appraisers thumping. For the second time in a decade, the popular PBS show visited Philadelphia, and about 6,000 area residents lined up with more than 10,000 treasures waiting to see if what they had framed on their walls, displayed in their cabinets, or stored under their beds was worth anything.
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NEWS
May 3, 2013
FAMILY SPY: The Secret World of Espionage James Bond wannabes must see this brand-new exhibit. On display: gadgets and gizmos galore - intelligence-gathering insects, a cipher machine - plus a once-top-secret presidential binder, and loads more de-classified memorabilia from the CIA, FBI and National Reconnaissance Office. Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th St., tomorrow-Oct. 6, $13-$28, 215-418-1200, fi.edu. Tides of Freedom Philly's waterfront has seen its share of "glory and gloom," said Penn race relations prof Tukufu Zuberi, curator of this new exhibit, subtitled, "African Presence on the Delaware River.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
WENDELL D. GARRETT, a historian and authority on American decorative arts who was widely known for his appearances as an appraiser on the long-running PBS series "Antiques Roadshow," has died. He was 83. Garrett died Nov. 14 of natural causes at a hospice facility in Williston, Vt., where he had moved recently from Manhattan. His former wife, Elisabeth Garrett Widmer, confirmed his death Monday. Known for his broad expertise, courtly manner and delight in sharing knowledge, Garrett appeared on every season of the American version of "Antiques Roadshow" since its launch in 1997.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | Karla Klein Albertson, For the Inquirer
Collecting travel posters is as much about historical evaluation as it is about aesthetic appreciation. Certainly, the vivid colors and intricate designs make these posters visual masterpieces and a focal point for any room. But if you were at the Olympic Winter Games in Grenoble or honeymooned in Hawaii, posters featuring those places will ring more bells when you find them in the marketplace. There are some great examples that boost Pennsylvania - especially Philadelphia - on paper: The Philadelphia Sesquicentennial International Exposition in 1926 celebrated 150 years of American independence with a poster of the Liberty Bell against the American flag, "a very strong image," says Nicholas Lowry, who appraises posters for PBS's Antiques Roadshow and is the president of Swann Galleries in New York City.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - With its curious sign that read "BOTTLES & DEVICES" leaning against a tree in the yard, the old farmhouse on Route 9 was just another odd Shore landmark to many beach-bound motorists. But pull into the unpaved driveway and venture inside the house's adjacent shop and nearby barn and you were met with a trove of 18th- and 19th-century antiques - and by the Peech family, whose members had spent decades restoring and selling the curios and relics, many gathered from Philadelphia estates.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
UPPER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - With its curious sign that read "BOTTLES & DEVICES" leaning against a tree in the yard, the old farmhouse on Route 9 was just another odd Shore landmark to many beach-bound motorists. But pull into the unpaved driveway and venture inside the house's adjacent shop and nearby barn and you were met with a trove of 18th- and 19th-century antiques - and by the Peech family, whose members had spent decades restoring and selling the curios and relics, many gathered from Philadelphia estates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Here's a hypothetical: You own a profitable puppet theater. (Chill out, Sparky. I said it was hypothetical.) The plots in your little fables stay pretty much the same from week to week, but people just can't get enough of those marionettes. Over the years, a number of other puppetry troupes, sniffing your success, set up theaters in town, inevitably siphoning off some of your audience. Each of you puts on a number of shows a week varying in elaborateness and audience appeal.
TRAVEL
September 25, 2011 | By Kristin Finan, HOUSTON CHRONICLE
MIAMI - We are surrounded by some of the most beautiful women in the world. Their bodies are perfectly bronzed, accented by white bikinis and sky-high stilettos, and their hair is so well-groomed that you know there's no way it's going to touch the clear, cool water of the inviting pool in front of us. Me? I'm sporting a full-coverage maternity suit with side ruching and a belly panel, the tops of my feet puffing up like marshmallows under the straps of my flip-flops. Maybe it wasn't such a great idea to visit Miami for the first time at 7 1/2 months pregnant.
NEWS
June 9, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tiger maple desk was a fake. Leigh Keno, one of the blond and bespectacled twins of Antiques Roadshow appraiser fame, knew it immediately, pointing out under his breath how pieces of 18th-century wood had been put together in an act of - yes, you may gasp - deception. Also in on his conclusion were John Hays, the erudite appraiser from Christie's; Keno brother Leslie; and the debonair Wendell Garrett, another Roadshow rock star, smiling conspiratorially in his wheelchair.
NEWS
December 21, 2007 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former Main Line antiques dealer who staged fake appraisals on Antiques Roadshow - and pleaded guilty to theft and fraud charges - is scheduled to be arraigned next week on theft charges in Bucks County and is now a fugitive. Russell Pritchard III of Beach Haven, N.J., is facing 140 counts of theft and receiving stolen property. He is accused of taking about $40,000 in antiques from a Bucks County woman with a promise to auction them. "She has never seen a dime," said David Zellis, Bucks County's first assistant district attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Haul out the flowered bell-bottoms and dust off the platform two-tones. They just might be ripe for the latest trend in antiquing - vintage clothing, even vintage 1980. "Part of it is the Internet and another part is that baby boomers are just getting older and seeing what they have may be valuable," said Charles Whitaker, a partner in Whitaker-Augusta Auction Co. of New Hope, which specializes in vintage apparel, textiles and accessories. "It is just part of the boom in interest in personal property in general.
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