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Antiviolence

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NEWS
October 18, 2006
When injuries flood into an emergency room, doctors conduct triage to decide the severity of injuries and who gets treatment first. It's time to examine violence in Philadelphia as though it were in triage. Which factors are most urgent; which require long-term treatment? Join us tonight at 6 for a panel discussion of these issues as part of the All Join Hands: Visions of Peace antiviolence mural project. It will be at the F.U.E.L. gallery, 3d and Arch Streets. For more information, call 267-971-0155.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After a year and a half of work, the Chester County Violence Prevention Project today will officially announce the establishment of the Chester County Center for a Peaceful Community. The center will serve as a resource for local efforts to prevent violence and assist victims of violence, including victims of spousal and domestic abuse. The center will open within several months, County Commissioner Andrew Dinniman said last week. The center has received grants from the Lang Family Foundation and the Southeast Pennsylvania Area Health Education Center, a West Chester-based organization that serves the five-county Southeastern Pennsylvania region.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The violent deaths of five children in eight days, including three who were mowed down by a hijacked car in North Philadelphia, are sparking outrage in communities around the city and calls to action by antiviolence activists. Those activists, from a spectrum of community antiviolence groups, held a rally Thursday evening at LOVE Park to talk about ways to prevent homicides among children and young people in the city. In an interview before the rally, Anton Moore, an antiviolence advocate in South Philadelphia, said adults must engage young people and talk to them about ways to avoid violence.
NEWS
June 12, 2004 | By Brendan McCarthy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 16-year-old Tareva Alston, this homework assignment hit home. After her older brother Uri went missing, Tareva poured her emotions into a school essay. When police late last month found a body under the Betsy Ross Bridge that matched her brother's description, Alston and her 10th-grade classmates took action. They created YELL (Young Educated Leaders Leading), an antiviolence group. Yesterday, Alston and more than 30 of her peers gathered at JFK Plaza to honor victims of gun violence.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Sean Carlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Antiviolence activists banded together at the Convention Center Friday during the first of a three-day conference addressing black-on-black crime across the country. The inaugural event is titled "Call to Action: National Conference on Black on Black Violence," It is presented by the Father's Day Rally Committee, and on Friday brought together organizations and individuals from around the U.S. Philadelphia activist Bilal Qayyum, conference chair and president of the Father's Day Rally Committee, outlined three goals: Sound the call to start a national movement toward combating black-on-black violence, breaking the problem into its component issues; Identify best practices in other cities; Develop a national antiviolence network of organizations to apply solutions.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antiviolence activists banded together at the Convention Center on Friday during the first day of a three-day conference addressing black-on-black crime across the country. Philadelphia activist Bilal Qayyum, conference chair and president of the Father's Day Rally Committee, which presented the conference, outlined three goals: Sound the call to start a national movement toward combating black-on-black violence, breaking the problem into its component issues. Identify best practices in other cities.
NEWS
January 2, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty-seven years ago, a Philadelphia man decided to marry a widow with six sons, one of whom was a gang member. Yesterday, David Fattah continued to defy convention with his longtime wife, Falaka Fattah, staging an antiviolence youth conference on the last day of Kwanzaa. As many New Year's revellers focused on sobering up, the Fattahs, founders of the House of Umoja, a West Philadelphia boys town for troubled teenagers, responded to a sobering statistic: 380 Philadelphia homicides in 2005.
NEWS
November 18, 2005 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a Germantown high school auditorium yesterday, young people gave community activists and law enforcement officials an earful of something rarely heard: frank talk about how youth violence affects teens. "Someone had me trapped in a corner with a gun to my head," said a student named Royal who did not give his last name when he came to the lectern. "I ran away. I told the cops, and I still got no justice. " Royal was among a stream of students who stepped to a lectern in the packed auditorium of Germantown High School to tell community leaders and law enforcement officials their stories, in a program organized by the Mayor's Office of Community Service.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a blustery, bitter Friday night last fall, hate came crashing through Patrick Morrison's living room window. "I came downstairs and I felt a draft, and I saw these two things that looked like stones or rocks on the floor," Morrison recalled yesterday. "I was in a state of shock. " The window was shattered. His front door, covered with eggs. And his family, frightened. All because Morrison, who is black, had recently moved onto a block in mostly white Burholme in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Dukes, 74, a North Philadelphia deli owner and businessman who worked to combat urban violence as a founding member of the group Men United for a Better Philadelphia, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, of a stroke at Temple University Hospital. Mr. Dukes was born Arnold Samuel Smith on Dec. 8, 1937. He began using the name Richard Dukes about 15 years ago. For about six years, Mr. Dukes operated Dukes Deli, a variety store in the 2500 block of Lehigh Avenue. He closed the business about three years ago. During that period, Mr. Smith was president of the Lehigh Avenue Business Association, a merchants group.
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NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The violent deaths of five children in eight days, including three who were mowed down by a hijacked car in North Philadelphia, are sparking outrage in communities around the city and calls to action by antiviolence activists. Those activists, from a spectrum of community antiviolence groups, held a rally Thursday evening at LOVE Park to talk about ways to prevent homicides among children and young people in the city. In an interview before the rally, Anton Moore, an antiviolence advocate in South Philadelphia, said adults must engage young people and talk to them about ways to avoid violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Sunday morning, strengthen your limbs while supporting a good cause - opposing illegal handguns in Philadelphia - at PSR Philadelphia's (Physicians for Social Responsibility) eighth annual Legs Against Arms 5K and 1-Mile Fun Walk at Arcadia University. Registration begins at 7:30 and the race begins at 9. Youths 12 and younger can run the 5K or participate in the 1-mile walk for free. The race, in collaboration with the Celebration of Peace program, will feature an exhibit hosted by community organizations and student groups at 9:30 inside Arcadia's Commons Building.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Wilson Rodriguez thought he had something worthwhile to say, but he wondered why a young audience would listen to a 21-year-old parolee convicted as a teenager in the bludgeoning death of a sleeping homeless man. He told more than a dozen youngsters in an event hosted by the Camden Board of Education he and his friends "did something horrible and someone ended up dying. " Two or three hands shot up, and questions followed: Why did you do it? How do you feel now? The children wanted to know more.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN The head of a Chicago-based violence prevention program toured Camden on Wednesday and said the initiative, which has been implemented in other cities, can be right for Camden as well. "We view violence as a disease. Diseases spread everywhere, whether that's Chicago, whether that's Camden, whether it's a big city, whether it's a small city," Frank Perez, national director of Cure Violence, said in an interview. He added: "Therefore, it doesn't make a difference where it is. It can be fought.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Ben Finley and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA Wei Chen honed his organizing skills as a student during a boycott triggered by racial violence at South Philadelphia High School four years ago. On Sunday, he was awarded a fellowship that will help him continue organizing Asian youth. "Organizing is one of the best ways to change our society," said Chen, who grew up in China's Fujian Province, where organizing was not tolerated. Chen, 22, is one of 10 young people to receive the inaugural Peace First Prize, which is supported by various foundations and which celebrates those who have confronted injustice.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Addressing urban violence as a problem that grips cities large and small, the Philadelphia-based organization Mothers in Charge hosted its first national conference on the impact of violence this week. The two-day conference at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel, which concluded Tuesday, featured grassroots activists, law enforcement officials, medical experts, and others. Dorothy Johnson-Speight, founder and executive director of the group, said her organization was hosting a national conference "because violence is a national problem.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By Matt Katz and Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie wants to add new gun penalties to state law, ease restrictions on the involuntary commitment of the mentally ill, mandate photo IDs for firearms purchases, and forbid children from buying violent video games without parental permission. Those are just a handful of more than a dozen proposals on violence that Christie, like other state and national lawmakers, is offering in the aftermath of the mass shooting Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Curt Schroder
The hospital community sees firsthand the terrible consequences of gun violence. Emergency rooms and trauma centers are where victims come to be saved, if possible. All too often, it is not: Nearly a third of all firearm injuries are fatal. Patients with gunshot injuries are disproportionately and heartbreakingly young. Firearm homicide is the second-leading cause of death for 15-to 24-year-olds in the United States. The survivors may live with a lifetime of physical and mental disability.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Kate Michelman and Carol Tracy
Violence against women is a profoundly serious and disturbing problem throughout the world. Daily we are reminded that global leaders have failed to address or find adequate remedies for the horrific tragedies that befall women and girls. Many of the victims are doing little more than trying to survive and provide stable lives for themselves and their children. We like to think it is different here at home. We expect women will be safe and treated fairly. We assume that no political party or partisan agenda will stand in the way of ensuring the safety of our grandmothers, our mothers, and our daughters.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Jim Abrams, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House on Thursday passed and sent to President Obama a far-reaching extension of the Violence Against Women Act. The vote came after House Republican leaders, cognizant of divisions in their own ranks and the need to improve their faltering image among women voters, accepted a bill that cleared the Senate two weeks ago on a strong bipartisan vote. The bill would renew a 1994 law that has set the standard for how to protect women, and some men, from domestic abuse and prosecute abusers.
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