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Antwun Echols

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SPORTS
December 3, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there were ever any doubts about Bernard Hopkins' heart, about his desire, about his status as the No. 1 middleweight in the world, surely he erased them Friday night. Almost 36 years old now, desperate for attention after 12 successful world title fights, and without a loss in more than seven years, the International Boxing Federation champion from Philadelphia put on a fearless rock-'em, sock-'em performance en route to a brawling 10th-round technical knockout of an insolent challenger named Antwun Echols.
SPORTS
December 13, 1999 | By Anthony L. Gargano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins was not tired. For 12 dynamic rounds, Hopkins had artfully stated his case to be included among boxing's elite, and now the International Boxing Federation middleweight champion sat in his cramped trailer and continued to speak out. "If it sounds like I'm beatin' up on David Reid . . . yeah, I'm beatin' up on him," Hopkins said, wagging his finger at Philadelphia's other prominent boxer, the darling of the fight game. "If you had any [guts], you'd go to your manager and say, 'You got to get me Bernard Hopkins in 2000.
SPORTS
January 8, 2013
WHEN HE DROPPED a 12-round, majority decision to challenger Chad Dawson on April 28, a loss that ended his reign as the WBC light-heavyweight champion, Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins considered ending his 24-year professional ring career. He turns 48 on Jan. 15. "I won't be boxing forever," said Hopkins, the oldest man ever to win a widely recognized world boxing title. "That's not going to happen. Who knows? Maybe at this time next year, I'll go fishing. " For now, it would appear, the fish are safe.
SPORTS
December 11, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins considers himself a boxing traditionalist in that he has little use for any weight class that includes the words "junior" or "super. " "In the old days, you had welterweights and then middleweights," said Hopkins, the long-reigning International Boxing Federation middleweight champion from North Philadelphia. "Junior middleweight is a made-up, phony weight class. It's a holding pen for welterweights who are too scared to move up to middleweight.
SPORTS
February 8, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Negotiations are still ongoing, but it appears Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, who for years has complained of being overlooked and underpaid, finally is about to join the Millionaire Boxers Club. Lou DiBella, senior vice president of Time Warner Sports, confirmed that Hopkins, the long-reigning International Boxing Federation middleweight champion from North Philadelphia, is close to signing a two-year, five-bout contract with HBO that potentially could be worth tens of millions of dollars.
SPORTS
December 12, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like so many in boxing, he was a street guy. Tough. Strong. Athletic. He grew up with two sisters and seven brothers with a single mother who didn't work outside the home. He met his father once, briefly, and didn't know until last year that he was the cousin of William Joppy, the World Boxing Association middleweight champion from Washington, D.C. He was born in Memphis, grew up in Plant City, Fla., and graduated from high school in Davenport, Iowa, and he didn't get into boxing until he was 18. And had it not been for boxing, there is no telling what would have happened.
SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins was having his hands wrapped at Champ's Gym the other day and he was talking about Antwun Echols, the man who will be trying to take away his world middleweight championship Sunday in Miami. "He has never heard the introduction," Hopkins said, alluding to the ceremony in the ring preceding a world championship fight. "It's like being at the Super Bowl. A different atmosphere. It's an experience. "I've been there," he said. "This is my 10th title defense. I'm creeping up on the record.
SPORTS
December 2, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins, boxing's angriest man, released his pent-up fury against overmatched Antwun Echols last night, scoring a technical knockout in the 10th round of an old-fashioned barroom brawl. The end came at 1 minute, 42 second of Round 10, when Echols, wobbly from nine losing rounds, caught a big right hand from Hopkins, staggered back into his corner and stood defenseless. Echols was looking at referee Tony Weeks when Hopkins nailed him. The victory was the 38th for Hopkins, a 35-year-old champion angered by the politics of boxing, which has kept him from big-money opportunities to unify the middleweight title.
SPORTS
December 13, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
In Fox's television series "The X-Files," FBI agents Scully and Mulder investigate strange beings who are not of this world. In last night's presentation of "The Ex Files," televised by Fox SportsNet, Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, while not from another planet, again demonstrated he is the best middleweight on Earth. Hey, the truth is out there, and it's obvious to anyone who cares to look. Unless a very skilled, very nasty 160-pound extraterrestrial arrives here from a distant galaxy and takes up boxing, Hopkins's domination of the division figures to extend well into the new millennium - or until he, if you'll pardon the expression, finds new worlds to conquer.
SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
For Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, this one is about faces. One face belongs to Hopkins's 5-month-old daughter, Latrice. The International Boxing Federation middleweight champion had a plastic sleeve sewn into his satin trunks, into which he has inserted a photo of his smiling, firstborn child. "I was wondering what I could do to get up for this fight, and I came up with this," said Hopkins (35-2-1, 27 KOs), who makes the 11th defense of his IBF 160-pound title when he takes on No. 1 contender Antwun Echols (22-2-1, 22 KOs)
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SPORTS
January 8, 2013
WHEN HE DROPPED a 12-round, majority decision to challenger Chad Dawson on April 28, a loss that ended his reign as the WBC light-heavyweight champion, Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins considered ending his 24-year professional ring career. He turns 48 on Jan. 15. "I won't be boxing forever," said Hopkins, the oldest man ever to win a widely recognized world boxing title. "That's not going to happen. Who knows? Maybe at this time next year, I'll go fishing. " For now, it would appear, the fish are safe.
SPORTS
December 3, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there were ever any doubts about Bernard Hopkins' heart, about his desire, about his status as the No. 1 middleweight in the world, surely he erased them Friday night. Almost 36 years old now, desperate for attention after 12 successful world title fights, and without a loss in more than seven years, the International Boxing Federation champion from Philadelphia put on a fearless rock-'em, sock-'em performance en route to a brawling 10th-round technical knockout of an insolent challenger named Antwun Echols.
SPORTS
December 2, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins, boxing's angriest man, released his pent-up fury against overmatched Antwun Echols last night, scoring a technical knockout in the 10th round of an old-fashioned barroom brawl. The end came at 1 minute, 42 second of Round 10, when Echols, wobbly from nine losing rounds, caught a big right hand from Hopkins, staggered back into his corner and stood defenseless. Echols was looking at referee Tony Weeks when Hopkins nailed him. The victory was the 38th for Hopkins, a 35-year-old champion angered by the politics of boxing, which has kept him from big-money opportunities to unify the middleweight title.
SPORTS
February 8, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Negotiations are still ongoing, but it appears Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, who for years has complained of being overlooked and underpaid, finally is about to join the Millionaire Boxers Club. Lou DiBella, senior vice president of Time Warner Sports, confirmed that Hopkins, the long-reigning International Boxing Federation middleweight champion from North Philadelphia, is close to signing a two-year, five-bout contract with HBO that potentially could be worth tens of millions of dollars.
SPORTS
December 13, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
In Fox's television series "The X-Files," FBI agents Scully and Mulder investigate strange beings who are not of this world. In last night's presentation of "The Ex Files," televised by Fox SportsNet, Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, while not from another planet, again demonstrated he is the best middleweight on Earth. Hey, the truth is out there, and it's obvious to anyone who cares to look. Unless a very skilled, very nasty 160-pound extraterrestrial arrives here from a distant galaxy and takes up boxing, Hopkins's domination of the division figures to extend well into the new millennium - or until he, if you'll pardon the expression, finds new worlds to conquer.
SPORTS
December 13, 1999 | By Anthony L. Gargano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins was not tired. For 12 dynamic rounds, Hopkins had artfully stated his case to be included among boxing's elite, and now the International Boxing Federation middleweight champion sat in his cramped trailer and continued to speak out. "If it sounds like I'm beatin' up on David Reid . . . yeah, I'm beatin' up on him," Hopkins said, wagging his finger at Philadelphia's other prominent boxer, the darling of the fight game. "If you had any [guts], you'd go to your manager and say, 'You got to get me Bernard Hopkins in 2000.
SPORTS
December 12, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like so many in boxing, he was a street guy. Tough. Strong. Athletic. He grew up with two sisters and seven brothers with a single mother who didn't work outside the home. He met his father once, briefly, and didn't know until last year that he was the cousin of William Joppy, the World Boxing Association middleweight champion from Washington, D.C. He was born in Memphis, grew up in Plant City, Fla., and graduated from high school in Davenport, Iowa, and he didn't get into boxing until he was 18. And had it not been for boxing, there is no telling what would have happened.
SPORTS
December 11, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins considers himself a boxing traditionalist in that he has little use for any weight class that includes the words "junior" or "super. " "In the old days, you had welterweights and then middleweights," said Hopkins, the long-reigning International Boxing Federation middleweight champion from North Philadelphia. "Junior middleweight is a made-up, phony weight class. It's a holding pen for welterweights who are too scared to move up to middleweight.
SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
For Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins, this one is about faces. One face belongs to Hopkins's 5-month-old daughter, Latrice. The International Boxing Federation middleweight champion had a plastic sleeve sewn into his satin trunks, into which he has inserted a photo of his smiling, firstborn child. "I was wondering what I could do to get up for this fight, and I came up with this," said Hopkins (35-2-1, 27 KOs), who makes the 11th defense of his IBF 160-pound title when he takes on No. 1 contender Antwun Echols (22-2-1, 22 KOs)
SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Hopkins was having his hands wrapped at Champ's Gym the other day and he was talking about Antwun Echols, the man who will be trying to take away his world middleweight championship Sunday in Miami. "He has never heard the introduction," Hopkins said, alluding to the ceremony in the ring preceding a world championship fight. "It's like being at the Super Bowl. A different atmosphere. It's an experience. "I've been there," he said. "This is my 10th title defense. I'm creeping up on the record.
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