CollectionsAnwar Al Awlaki
IN THE NEWS

Anwar Al Awlaki

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Ahmed Al-Haj, Associated Press
SANAA, Yemen (AP) — In a significant new blow to al-Qaida, U.S. airstrikes in Yemen on Friday killed Anwar al-Awlaki, an American militant cleric who became a prominent figure in the terror network's most dangerous branch, using his fluent English and Internet savvy to draw recruits for attacks in the United States. The strike was the biggest U.S. success in hitting al-Qaida's leadership since the May killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. But it raises questions that other strikes did not: Al-Awlaki was an American citizen who has not been charged with any crime.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Henry Goldman and Chris Dolmetsch, Bloomberg News
NEW YORK - New York City police have arrested a man who was allegedly plotting to build and explode a bomb in an attempt to kill government workers and returning military personnel, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. The man had been under surveillance for more than a year, said Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, who joined the mayor and District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. at a news conference Sunday evening to announce the arrest. The mayor identified the man as Jose Pimentel, 27, an unemployed Manhattan resident and U.S. citizen who is originally from the Dominican Republic.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
DICK CHENEY emerged over the weekend from wherever it is he hides from war- crimes prosecutors to go on CNN, where he demanded an apology from President Obama. Obama, Cheney said, had wrongly criticized the Bush administration for riding roughshod over the Constitution in its pursuit of the war on terror. When the time came to order a hit against Anwar al-Awlaki, a radical Muslim cleric ( and American citizen), Obama took "robust action" that doesn't look all that different from President Bush's policies.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press
HOUSTON - A Texas man accused of attempting to sneak out of the country with restricted U.S. military documents, money, and equipment in order to join al-Qaeda was convicted Monday of trying to help the terrorist organization. Barry Walter Bujol Jr. was convicted of attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization and aggravated identity theft. He faces up to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced Feb. 8. Bujol, a U.S. citizen, represented himself at his trial, which was heard at his request by a judge instead of a jury.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
SOME FACTS about America's drone warfare: *  The U.S. military now has 8,000 drones (military designation: UAV, for unmanned aerial vehicle) with plans to add more. There are several types: The MQ-1B Predator is 27 feet long with a wingspan of 55 feet and the ability to fire two Hellfire missiles. *  Most drones are operated remotely from military sites in Nevada, Texas and elsewhere, plus a site near the CIA headquarters, in Virginia. The drones themselves take off from bases in southern Afghanistan, Djibouti, and - it was just revealed this week - Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Ed White, Associated Press
DETROIT - A Nigerian who pleaded guilty to trying to blow up a Detroit-bound plane began his path to terrorism with a text message from a top al-Qaeda figure in Yemen, the U.S. government said Friday in a court filing that discloses new details about their relationship. Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab faces life in prison at his sentencing Thursday. Although the punishment is mandatory, prosecutors filed a memo urging the judge to also order the maximum penalty - which ranges from 20 years to life in prison - for seven other crimes.
NEWS
October 25, 2011
TREASON IS the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution. It consists of levying war against the United States or in adhering to the nation's enemies, giving them aid and comfort. If everything we have been led to believe about Anwar al-Awlaki is true, then it is almost certain that he committed treason against the United States, and I shed no tears for his demise. However, it seems rather clear that our president found al-Awlaki guilty of treason or felony without trial, and ordered his execution.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
When Osama bin Laden was killed last year by a daring Navy SEAL raid, some dared hope that the bloody end of the despicable al Qaeda leader would signal a return to cherished U.S. traditions of respect for privacy and the rule of law that existed before the 9?/?11 attacks. By that measure, bin Laden's spirit is alive and well. The erosion of American values continues, even worsens. Consider: As we hail the killing of this reprehensible enemy of freedom, a former CIA official, Jose Rodriguez, is promoting a book in which he flat-out admits, even brags, that in 2005, he destroyed 92 videotapes of the waterboarding — that is, torture — of terrorism suspects in direct defiance of several court orders to preserve that very evidence.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
The nation's vexation over the morality and legality of President Obama's drone war has produced a salutary but hopelessly confused debate. Three categories of questions are being asked. They must be separated to be clearly understood. 1. By what right does the president order the killing by drone of enemies abroad? What criteria justify assassination? Answer: (a) imminent threat, under the doctrine of self-defense, and (b) affiliation with al-Qaeda, under the laws of war. Imminent threat is obvious.
NEWS
August 16, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
A place is made sacred by a widespread belief that it was visited by the miraculous or the transcendent (Lourdes, the Temple Mount), by the presence there once of great nobility and sacrifice (Gettysburg), or by the blood of martyrs and the indescribable suffering of the innocent (Auschwitz). When we speak of Ground Zero as hallowed ground, what we mean is that it belongs to those who suffered and died there - and that such ownership obliges us, the living, to preserve the dignity and memory of the place, never allowing it to be forgotten, trivialized, or misappropriated.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 2013
The nation's vexation over the morality and legality of President Obama's drone war has produced a salutary but hopelessly confused debate. Three categories of questions are being asked. They must be separated to be clearly understood. 1. By what right does the president order the killing by drone of enemies abroad? What criteria justify assassination? Answer: (a) imminent threat, under the doctrine of self-defense, and (b) affiliation with al-Qaeda, under the laws of war. Imminent threat is obvious.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
SOME FACTS about America's drone warfare: *  The U.S. military now has 8,000 drones (military designation: UAV, for unmanned aerial vehicle) with plans to add more. There are several types: The MQ-1B Predator is 27 feet long with a wingspan of 55 feet and the ability to fire two Hellfire missiles. *  Most drones are operated remotely from military sites in Nevada, Texas and elsewhere, plus a site near the CIA headquarters, in Virginia. The drones themselves take off from bases in southern Afghanistan, Djibouti, and - it was just revealed this week - Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
When Osama bin Laden was killed last year by a daring Navy SEAL raid, some dared hope that the bloody end of the despicable al Qaeda leader would signal a return to cherished U.S. traditions of respect for privacy and the rule of law that existed before the 9?/?11 attacks. By that measure, bin Laden's spirit is alive and well. The erosion of American values continues, even worsens. Consider: As we hail the killing of this reprehensible enemy of freedom, a former CIA official, Jose Rodriguez, is promoting a book in which he flat-out admits, even brags, that in 2005, he destroyed 92 videotapes of the waterboarding — that is, torture — of terrorism suspects in direct defiance of several court orders to preserve that very evidence.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Ed White, Associated Press
DETROIT - A Nigerian who pleaded guilty to trying to blow up a Detroit-bound plane began his path to terrorism with a text message from a top al-Qaeda figure in Yemen, the U.S. government said Friday in a court filing that discloses new details about their relationship. Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab faces life in prison at his sentencing Thursday. Although the punishment is mandatory, prosecutors filed a memo urging the judge to also order the maximum penalty - which ranges from 20 years to life in prison - for seven other crimes.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Henry Goldman and Chris Dolmetsch, Bloomberg News
NEW YORK - New York City police have arrested a man who was allegedly plotting to build and explode a bomb in an attempt to kill government workers and returning military personnel, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. The man had been under surveillance for more than a year, said Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, who joined the mayor and District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. at a news conference Sunday evening to announce the arrest. The mayor identified the man as Jose Pimentel, 27, an unemployed Manhattan resident and U.S. citizen who is originally from the Dominican Republic.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press
HOUSTON - A Texas man accused of attempting to sneak out of the country with restricted U.S. military documents, money, and equipment in order to join al-Qaeda was convicted Monday of trying to help the terrorist organization. Barry Walter Bujol Jr. was convicted of attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization and aggravated identity theft. He faces up to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced Feb. 8. Bujol, a U.S. citizen, represented himself at his trial, which was heard at his request by a judge instead of a jury.
NEWS
October 25, 2011
TREASON IS the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution. It consists of levying war against the United States or in adhering to the nation's enemies, giving them aid and comfort. If everything we have been led to believe about Anwar al-Awlaki is true, then it is almost certain that he committed treason against the United States, and I shed no tears for his demise. However, it seems rather clear that our president found al-Awlaki guilty of treason or felony without trial, and ordered his execution.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - The United States has raised the stakes in its war against al-Qaeda in Yemen, killing nine of the terror group's militants in the second high-profile air strike in as many weeks. Those killed in the attack late Friday night included the son of Anwar al-Awlaki, the American Yemeni militant killed in a Sept. 30 strike. Yemeni officials on Saturday attributed the recent U.S. successes against al-Qaeda to better intelligence from an army of Yemeni informers and cooperation with the Saudis, Washington's longtime Arab allies.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Ed White, Associated Press
DETROIT - A Nigerian man pleaded guilty Wednesday to trying to bring down a jetliner with a bomb in his underwear, defiantly telling a federal judge that he acted in retaliation for the killing of Muslims worldwide and referring to the failed explosive as a "blessed weapon. " Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who acknowledged working for al-Qaeda and never denied the allegations, entered the plea against his attorney's advice on the second day of his trial. He faces a mandatory life sentence for the 2009 attack that aimed to kill nearly 300 people on Christmas Day in the skies above Detroit.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
DICK CHENEY emerged over the weekend from wherever it is he hides from war- crimes prosecutors to go on CNN, where he demanded an apology from President Obama. Obama, Cheney said, had wrongly criticized the Bush administration for riding roughshod over the Constitution in its pursuit of the war on terror. When the time came to order a hit against Anwar al-Awlaki, a radical Muslim cleric ( and American citizen), Obama took "robust action" that doesn't look all that different from President Bush's policies.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|