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Aortic Valve

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April 30, 2012 | Associated Press
VERSAILLES, Ky. - Dynaformer, the sire of Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, died Sunday at Three Chimneys Farm two weeks after suffering a heart attack in his stall. The 27-year-old stallion was one of the most successful sires in the thoroughbred industry with 21 crops that have earned more than $105 million, including 130 stakes winners and 18 millionaires. Three Chimneys president Case Clay said in a news release Sunday that "Dynaformer impacted the industry in a way that few ever have or will" and called him an awe-inspiring horse to be around.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A relatively new procedure in which a small balloon is used to open up a damaged heart valve is not as effective as surgically replacing the valve and should be used only when the patient cannot tolerate surgery, according to a study published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The study recommended that the procedure, balloon valvuloplasty, should be reserved for cases in which the patient is too sick or too old to tolerate open-heart surgery. About half of 170 elderly patients who underwent balloon valvuloplasty on a narrowed aortic valve went on to develop recurring problems within a year.
NEWS
September 18, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sprinter Mary Kate Phelan, a record holder at Council Rock North High School, struggled this spring with a tough decision: give up running competitively or undergo open heart surgery. The demure 17-year-old, who loves "the adrenaline rush from racing," opted for the aortic valve transplant. Eleven days ago, she laced up her red Pumas, stepped on the high school track for the first time since surgery, and flashed an optimistic smile. After a light workout - twice around the 400-meter track followed by four easy 100s - Phelan pronounced, "It's good to be back.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
Cases of flu had begun to be reported here and around the country when the patient awoke on a crisp, late-fall morning feeling miserable. He had a fever and his aches were intense. He had absolutely no appetite. He went to his doctor, who thought the patient's illness seemed consistent with flu, or seasonal influenza. Though the patient hadn't been around anyone he'd known to be infected, because people shed the flu virus for about a day before they feel sick themselves, it was possible he had gotten ill from a colleague on the verge of going under himself.
SPORTS
November 1, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Toronto Maple Leafs prospect Luca Cereda is recovering after undergoing heart surgery in Lausanne, Switzerland. The 19-year-old Swiss prospect, who was operated on two weeks ago in a procedure that lasted four hours, will be allowed to return home in a few days. Doctors detected a heart murmur in Cereda during the Maple Leafs' training camp and it later was determined to be a faulty leaflet in the aortic valve, which pumps blood from the heart. "It wasn't an easy surgery, but there weren't any complications," said the surgeon, Ludwig von Segesser.
SPORTS
March 19, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Houston Astros third baseman Aaron Boone will have open heart surgery to replace an aortic valve. Boone made the announcement yesterday in Kissimmee, Fla., saying he has known about his heart condition since college but tests after his routine physical determined he needed surgery. It is not an emergency, but doctors indicated the procedure was needed. He said doctors told him he could play baseball when he recovers, but he's not sure whether he will. An emotional Boone delivered the news flanked by general manager Ed Wade and manager Cecil Cooper and in front of a somber room filled with teammates and Astros officials.
SPORTS
September 3, 2009 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy Holliday The Cardinals began yesterday 26-9 and had added nine games to their lead in the NL Central since acquiring third baseman Matt Holliday from Oakland in late July. Holliday has found much more success against NL pitching than he did during his season and a half in the AL. When St. Louis acquired him on July 24, he'd batted .286 with 11 home runs and 54 RBIs in 93 games with the A's. With the Cards, he went into last night hitting .371 with nine homers and 35 RBIs in 35 games.
SPORTS
October 11, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington Wizards center Etan Thomas will have open-heart surgery today to repair an aortic-valve leak, a procedure that requires months of recovery time but might not mean the end of his NBA career. Thomas missed the start of training camp Oct. 2 after a routine physical revealed an abnormality in his heart. The Wizards said they wouldn't comment or make the doctor available until after the surgery. Dr. Ammar Bafi, a cardiothoracic surgeon at Washington Hospital Center and an expert on the procedure, said the operation isn't career-ending for most people.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Rong Hu and John Stern, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. It was supposed to be a routine surgery. At least, as routine as surgery can be on the aorta - the largest blood vessel in the body, one connected directly to your heart, the one that carries all the blood going to every part of your body other than your lungs. The story started about two years ago, when a CT scan done for chest pain and difficult breathing showed that M.E. had an aortic aneurysm. An aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel - basically, part of the blood vessel begins to balloon and get wider.
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NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
Cases of flu had begun to be reported here and around the country when the patient awoke on a crisp, late-fall morning feeling miserable. He had a fever and his aches were intense. He had absolutely no appetite. He went to his doctor, who thought the patient's illness seemed consistent with flu, or seasonal influenza. Though the patient hadn't been around anyone he'd known to be infected, because people shed the flu virus for about a day before they feel sick themselves, it was possible he had gotten ill from a colleague on the verge of going under himself.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Rong Hu and John Stern, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. It was supposed to be a routine surgery. At least, as routine as surgery can be on the aorta - the largest blood vessel in the body, one connected directly to your heart, the one that carries all the blood going to every part of your body other than your lungs. The story started about two years ago, when a CT scan done for chest pain and difficult breathing showed that M.E. had an aortic aneurysm. An aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel - basically, part of the blood vessel begins to balloon and get wider.
SPORTS
April 30, 2012 | Associated Press
VERSAILLES, Ky. - Dynaformer, the sire of Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, died Sunday at Three Chimneys Farm two weeks after suffering a heart attack in his stall. The 27-year-old stallion was one of the most successful sires in the thoroughbred industry with 21 crops that have earned more than $105 million, including 130 stakes winners and 18 millionaires. Three Chimneys president Case Clay said in a news release Sunday that "Dynaformer impacted the industry in a way that few ever have or will" and called him an awe-inspiring horse to be around.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I was disappointed in your response to a recent question pertaining to the death of Ambassador Richard Holbrooke from a ruptured thoracic (chest) aortic artery dissection. You failed to mention that a bicuspid aortic valve, found in 1 to 2 percent of the population, is found in 7 to 14 percent of all thoracic aortic dissections. Could you please let your readers know about the seriousness of bicuspid aortic valves? Answer: While there is an increased risk of rupture to the aorta in a person with a bicuspid aortic valve, I do not have any information that indicates Holbrooke had the anomaly of a bicuspid valve.
SPORTS
September 3, 2009 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy Holliday The Cardinals began yesterday 26-9 and had added nine games to their lead in the NL Central since acquiring third baseman Matt Holliday from Oakland in late July. Holliday has found much more success against NL pitching than he did during his season and a half in the AL. When St. Louis acquired him on July 24, he'd batted .286 with 11 home runs and 54 RBIs in 93 games with the A's. With the Cards, he went into last night hitting .371 with nine homers and 35 RBIs in 35 games.
NEWS
July 6, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Should a 97-year-old man undergo an expensive, dangerous open-heart operation to repair a lethal tear in a main artery of his heart? No, concluded the patient, Michael DeBakey, the world-famous cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered the operation. Yes, said his family and surgeons, who prevailed after DeBakey lapsed into coma. DeBakey later said they did the right thing. After a long, touch-and-go recovery, he resumed a busy schedule before his death last July at age 99. DeBakey was a visionary, a genius, but his dilemma has become increasingly ordinary.
SPORTS
March 19, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Houston Astros third baseman Aaron Boone will have open heart surgery to replace an aortic valve. Boone made the announcement yesterday in Kissimmee, Fla., saying he has known about his heart condition since college but tests after his routine physical determined he needed surgery. It is not an emergency, but doctors indicated the procedure was needed. He said doctors told him he could play baseball when he recovers, but he's not sure whether he will. An emotional Boone delivered the news flanked by general manager Ed Wade and manager Cecil Cooper and in front of a somber room filled with teammates and Astros officials.
SPORTS
October 11, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington Wizards center Etan Thomas will have open-heart surgery today to repair an aortic-valve leak, a procedure that requires months of recovery time but might not mean the end of his NBA career. Thomas missed the start of training camp Oct. 2 after a routine physical revealed an abnormality in his heart. The Wizards said they wouldn't comment or make the doctor available until after the surgery. Dr. Ammar Bafi, a cardiothoracic surgeon at Washington Hospital Center and an expert on the procedure, said the operation isn't career-ending for most people.
NEWS
September 18, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sprinter Mary Kate Phelan, a record holder at Council Rock North High School, struggled this spring with a tough decision: give up running competitively or undergo open heart surgery. The demure 17-year-old, who loves "the adrenaline rush from racing," opted for the aortic valve transplant. Eleven days ago, she laced up her red Pumas, stepped on the high school track for the first time since surgery, and flashed an optimistic smile. After a light workout - twice around the 400-meter track followed by four easy 100s - Phelan pronounced, "It's good to be back.
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