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Apartheid

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NEWS
February 8, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Apartheid left blacks without hope and gave whites a false sense of security, South African Finance Minister Barend du Plessis said yesterday. In a ringing denunciation of the country's racial segregationist policies, du Plessis said in a statement, "The only real security is to be found in shared values and ideals. " He said 42 years of apartheid had deprived blacks, who outnumber whites by five to one, of all hope and had sowed the seeds of conflict. "In the previous era, our prosperity depended on our ability to contain conflict at home and across our borders" and on the banning and imprisonment of apartheid's critics, du Plessis said.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Albertina Sisulu lamented what apartheid did to her family, but lived to see her children become leaders in South Africa. The veteran of the anti-apartheid movement died yesterday at the age of 92. Her husband, Walter Sisulu, who died in 2003, spent 25 years in custody on Robben Island alongside Nelson Mandela, whom he had brought into the African national Congress, now South Africa's governing party. Mandela was the best man when Walter and Albertina married in 1944.
NEWS
August 20, 1986
Some Americans do not understand that apartheid is a savage monster because they have never experienced firsthand anything resembling the definition of the word apartheid given by William H. Nault, general chairman of the editorial advisory boards of the World Book Encyclopedia. It runs: "Racial segregation, especially segregation of blacks from whites as a principle of society upheld by law and underlying the domestic policy of the South African government. . . . Laws isolate these groups in most activities, but especially in education, employment, housing, politics and recreation.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Calling apartheid a sin, the church of President P.W. Botha has renewed its admission of guilt in fostering the system of racial segregation and moved to keep its sister churches of black, mixed-race and Indian peoples in the fold. The action is considered a small advancement for the white Dutch Reformed Church, whose 1.5 million members include 95 percent of Botha's cabinet. In 1986, it acknowledged that apartheid was a mistake, that the church's attempts to justify it biblically were wrong and that racism was a sin. Yesterday, one day after the church issued its statement, a government- appointed commission recommended giving the right to vote to all adults, regardless of race.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Making a series of clicks and consonant sounds unfamiliar to the American ear, self-exiled South African editor Donald Woods reeled off a sentence in one of the native languages of blacks in his country. Then he translated with a smile: "I'm in some difficulty because I see you don't allow smoking in here. " The 150 people crowded into the Penn State-Ogontz campus meeting room Friday afternoon roared with laughter. Woods deftly used humor as a weapon against his native country's policy of apartheid.
NEWS
September 4, 1988
The official line from the ever-so-smooth South African diplomats who periodically pass through Philadelphia is that the worst aspects of apartheid are history and that South Africa is slowly becoming what we might consider a normal nation. The pace of reform might not satisfy us, they say, but reform is irreversible. Now comes news of a giant step backward. A bill that is about to clear the South African Parliament would put new teeth in the much-ignored law that forbids nonwhites from living in areas reserved for whites.
NEWS
June 17, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
Toting placards and chanting slogans that reflected their anti-apartheid sentiments, more than 200 demonstrators marched for two hours in Center City yesterday to mark the 10th anniversary of the Soweto uprising in South Africa. The protesters, who massed during evening rush hour in front of IBM offices at 17th and Market streets, used the opportunity to call for the computer giant's divestiture from South Africa, where its 1985 sales exceeded $230 million. "They should get out because that will send a double message (to the South African government)
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Apartheid has many faces. While Americans and others around the world have become accustomed to scenes of rioting South Africans or police whipping protesters, the repression of blacks manifests itself in a multitude of ways. The images of everyday life under apartheid have been captured in an exhibition of documentary black-and-white photographs currently on display at Haverford College. For Senti Thobejane, a South African in his second year at Haverford, the exhibit, South Africe: The Cordoned Heart, strikes a deep, responsive chord.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
  A friend's young daughter, visiting from her home in South Africa, once told me, "It's not a matter of if something terrible will happen to you, but when, and how bad will it be?" Such is the legacy of apartheid explored in Pamela Gien's The Syringa Tree . In this Theatre Horizon production, terrible - often very, very terrible - things happen, but also beautiful things, made even more so by the challenges her characters face, both internal and external. Gien descends from British South Africans, a group who under apartheid occupied a place slightly to the left of Afrikaners (of mostly Dutch ancestry)
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | BY MICHAEL OREN
THE WAR against Israel has passed through three phases. The first was the attempt to annihilate Israel by conventional means. It began with Israel's birth in 1948, when Arab armies nearly captured Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, and ended in the 1973 Yom Kippur War, when Israeli forces came within artillery range of Cairo and Damascus. The next stage, starting in the early 1970s, sought to cripple Israel through terror. Suicide bombers nearly paralyzed the country, but by 2005 they too were defeated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Created by the playwright/director/theorist Peter Brook, with his longtime collaborator Marie-Helene Estienne, The Suit is a touching musical play about life in South Africa under the tyranny of apartheid. Now at the Prince Music Theater, the show has been on tour, first in London, then New York, and is on its way to Washington. It stars the beautiful Nonhlanhla Kheswa as a young wife who longs for "more" in her life. Her husband (Ivanno Jeremiah) learns she has been cheating on him, and when he comes home unexpectedly one morning, he scares off her lover, who leaves behind his suit.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Robert Moran and Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writers
Political leaders across the Philadelphia region Thursday praised Nelson Mandela as an iconic figure whose struggle for justice inspired the world. "I had the honor of meeting President Mandela in Philadelphia in the 1990s, and he is one of the most remarkable and influential people I have ever met," Mayor Nutter said. "I traveled to South Africa in 2005 and visited Robben Island, where President Mandela was imprisoned. . . . I saw his cell. I watched his long walk to freedom on live television when he was released from prison by the apartheid regime.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Arthur Chaskalson, 81, a civil rights lawyer who once helped defend Nelson Mandela and later became South Africa's chief justice, has died. South Africa's presidency confirmed Mr. Chaskalson's death Saturday. The state-owned South African Broadcasting Corp. said he had been battling leukemia. Mr. Chaskalson was one of several lawyers on the defense team that challenged the apartheid government's prosecution of members of the African National Congress for sabotage in the 1960s case known as the Rivonia Trial.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
I'M AWAY FOR two weeks and come back to an array of other-worldly developments: Donovan McNabb may come back (!?), Arlene Ackerman will get a fat unemployment check, some Philly fourth-graders are charged with sexual assault, Occupy Philly got evicted (but first started a valuable conversation) and Hip-Hop was fired by the Sixers and will be replaced (maybe) by a . . . moose? You know, Philadelphia's unofficial symbol - the freaking moose? Just another instance of mindless change for the sake of change.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2011
Authorized By Allister Sparks and Mpho Tutu HarperOne. 368 pp. $29.99 Reviewed by Scott Kraft The history of the long fight to end apartheid in South Africa had many heroes but none quite like a 5-foot-4 Anglican archbishop with an impish sense of humor who became a giant irritant to the white authorities. Desmond Tutu's gift for the art of protest politics was on sweet display one pivotal weekend in 1989, when Frederick W. de Klerk was about to be installed as president and the nation pulsed with clashes between protesters and police.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011 | By Cary Darling, McClatchy Newspapers
We sure have come a long way since Out of Africa and The Flame Trees of Thika . In the second decade of the 21st century, some of the most compelling contemporary crime-fiction novels are either set in or coming from Africa. Much as Scandinavia became associated with the genre a few years back - thanks in large part to Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy - Africa may become a new capital of literary crime. At the forefront is Roger Smith, a director and screenwriter who lives in Cape Town, South Africa, and writes with the brutal beauty of an Elmore Leonard in a very bad mood.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
Magnus Malan, 81, a South African general and defense minister who in the 1980s helped devise and carry out his nation's strategy to preserve its system of racial segregation, died Monday of heart failure in Cape Town. Gen. Malan used the phrase total onslaught to describe threats to apartheid, as the country's racial laws were known. He saw threats from Communists, African countries, and American liberals. His answer was "a total strategy," combining the political, economic, and psychological spheres as well as the military.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
Kader Asmal, 76, a prominent member of South Africa's governing African National Congress who pressed his party to keep its democratic promises, died Wednesday in a Cape Town hospital, the ANC said. No cause of death was given. Mr. Asmal led antiapartheid protests as a high school student in rural eastern South Africa. He later left for Britain and Ireland, where he continued antiapartheid activism and studied and taught law. He returned to South Africa in 1990 and participated in negotiations that ended apartheid.
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