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Aplastic Anemia

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NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Michael Brooks, 58, a Philadelphia high school and college star who years after his playing career ended remained one of the most admired and mysterious figures in the city's basketball history, died Monday. Brooks, who scored 2,628 points during his standout career at La Salle University (then La Salle College) after starring at West Catholic High School, suffered a massive stroke Monday during a hospital stay near his home in Switzerland, his sister Aleta Arthurs said in a phone interview.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Flying the A-6 fighter plane at 8,000 feet was much better than Nintendo or grossing out girls for Matt Repsher, an itchy 13-year-old from Springfield. "I felt like saying over the radio, 'This is your captain speaking,' " Matt said. Matt's chance at the controls came last week during his flight from the Willow Grove Naval Air Station to the Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia. It was the beginning of a three-day trip sponsored by Kids Inc., a nonprofit organization that fulfills the wishes of seriously ill children.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Marita Francis Barrington, 83, an educator, died Sunday, April 27, of bone marrow failure and aplastic anemia at Assisi House in Aston. Born Marion Inez Barrington, she was a professed member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 63 years. Sister Marita, a graduate of John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School, entered the religious order in 1948 and professed her first vows in 1950. She earned a bachelor's degree in English education from Villanova University in 1965 and a master's degree in the teaching of science from East Stroudsburg College in 1976.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bone-marrow transplants, which are being performed on radiation victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, are usually reserved for patients who are otherwise almost certain to die, medical experts said yesterday. The procedure itself is relatively simple, but the long-term survival rate in the best of circumstances is perhaps 50-50, and in less than ideal conditions, such as those at Chernobyl, it may be considerably lower, the experts said. Tom Schwarz, a spokesman for Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, where 80 to 100 such transplants are performed yearly, said the Soviet patients were probably suffering from aplastic anemia, a condition in which the bone marrow completely fails to perform its normal functions.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen L. Feldman, 43, of Philadelphia, an internationally known expert on energy management and policy at the University of Pennsylvania, died yesterday of complications arising from aplastic anemia. Mr. Feldman, who had been suffering from the disease for four years, died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Friends said that despite the onset of the disease, which forced him to give up the chairmanship of the department of city and regional planning at Penn, Mr. Feldman remained active in scholarly work and in promoting energy and international projects until his death.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
A DARK WARNING Lest you think there's an easy way to combat the winter pallor beginning to afflict many of us, beware of tanning pills containing canthaxanthin. They could kill you, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center physician reports in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Available through tanning salons and advertisements, such pills are thought to have killed a previously healthy young woman whose skin turned orange after she took the drug and who came down with malaise, headaches, fatigue, weight loss and aplastic anemia - a frequently fatal deficiency of blood cells due to bone-marrow failure, the doctor says.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Deborah Bolling INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Donald F. Hilbush, 75, died Wednesday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center unaware that his wife of 52 years, Nancy M. Hilbush, 74, had died there three days earlier. Mr. Hilbush, a semiretired, self-employed professional electrical engineer, had been under heavy sedation in the hospital, family members said. He and his wife, a gardening enthusiast, had lived in Nether Providence for the last 15 years and prior to that lived in Springfield for 10 years. Mrs. Hilbush, who friends said was a "woman who got things done," was born in Harrisburg and graduated from John Harris High School there.
SPORTS
July 26, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
With LeBron James out, Dwyane Wade proved he is definitely back. Wade stepped into the starting lineup and scored 20 points in his first action in more than 4 months, and the United States crushed Canada, 120-65, last night in Las Vegas in the opener of its pre-Olympic exhibition schedule. James, the NBA's leading scorer, missed the game because of a mildly sprained right ankle, but the Americans still have plenty of offense without him. Carmelo Anthony and Michael Redd also finished with 20 points, and Kobe Bryant added 15. The Americans made 16 of their first 20 shots and ended at 65.7 percent (44 of 67)
SPORTS
August 8, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeremy Ilaoa always has weighed less than his fraternal twin, Jason, but never this much less. The way Jeremy sees things, it's better to be lighter than dead. Jeremy used to carry 215 pounds on his 6-2 frame, compared to Jason's 240. That was a fine weight for a 17-year-old junior playing strong safety for the high school football team in Walla Walla, Wash. Jason played defensive end and tight end. Now, Jeremy's down to 195. And he's happy about it, pacing the sidelines at Eagles training camp, the sun bouncing off his Eagles cap worn backward as he follows his host, Irving Fryar, with his soft brown eyes.
SPORTS
July 26, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
NBA superstar Steve Nash is joining the reclusive owner of the Vancouver Whitecaps in a bid to buy a Major League Soccer franchise. The Whitecaps hope to bring an MLS team to Vancouver when the league grants two new franchises in 2011. The Phoenix Suns point guard said yesterday he will not be a majority owner, but will put a significant amount of money toward the project, joining current owner Greg Kerfoot. Blackburn has given Aston Villa permission to open discussions with former U.S. goalkeeper Brad Friedel, 37, about a transfer in the Premier League.
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NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Michael Brooks, 58, a Philadelphia high school and college star who years after his playing career ended remained one of the most admired and mysterious figures in the city's basketball history, died Monday. Brooks, who scored 2,628 points during his standout career at La Salle University (then La Salle College) after starring at West Catholic High School, suffered a massive stroke Monday during a hospital stay near his home in Switzerland, his sister Aleta Arthurs said in a phone interview.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Marita Francis Barrington, 83, an educator, died Sunday, April 27, of bone marrow failure and aplastic anemia at Assisi House in Aston. Born Marion Inez Barrington, she was a professed member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 63 years. Sister Marita, a graduate of John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School, entered the religious order in 1948 and professed her first vows in 1950. She earned a bachelor's degree in English education from Villanova University in 1965 and a master's degree in the teaching of science from East Stroudsburg College in 1976.
SPORTS
July 26, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
With LeBron James out, Dwyane Wade proved he is definitely back. Wade stepped into the starting lineup and scored 20 points in his first action in more than 4 months, and the United States crushed Canada, 120-65, last night in Las Vegas in the opener of its pre-Olympic exhibition schedule. James, the NBA's leading scorer, missed the game because of a mildly sprained right ankle, but the Americans still have plenty of offense without him. Carmelo Anthony and Michael Redd also finished with 20 points, and Kobe Bryant added 15. The Americans made 16 of their first 20 shots and ended at 65.7 percent (44 of 67)
SPORTS
July 26, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
NBA superstar Steve Nash is joining the reclusive owner of the Vancouver Whitecaps in a bid to buy a Major League Soccer franchise. The Whitecaps hope to bring an MLS team to Vancouver when the league grants two new franchises in 2011. The Phoenix Suns point guard said yesterday he will not be a majority owner, but will put a significant amount of money toward the project, joining current owner Greg Kerfoot. Blackburn has given Aston Villa permission to open discussions with former U.S. goalkeeper Brad Friedel, 37, about a transfer in the Premier League.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly Dickensian, Shelly Valenti pointed out, but her new favorite holiday tale is close. Valenti runs the New Jersey chapter of the Kelly Anne Dolan Memorial Fund, an Ambler-based charity that aids families with sick children. Like those of a host of local nonprofits, the organization's coffers dwindled to dangerously low levels after Sept. 11, 2001. This year, the chapter was struggling to pay its bills, so it appealed to local businesspeople to help cover its rent in Marlton for a month.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | By Deborah Bolling INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Donald F. Hilbush, 75, died Wednesday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center unaware that his wife of 52 years, Nancy M. Hilbush, 74, had died there three days earlier. Mr. Hilbush, a semiretired, self-employed professional electrical engineer, had been under heavy sedation in the hospital, family members said. He and his wife, a gardening enthusiast, had lived in Nether Providence for the last 15 years and prior to that lived in Springfield for 10 years. Mrs. Hilbush, who friends said was a "woman who got things done," was born in Harrisburg and graduated from John Harris High School there.
SPORTS
August 8, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeremy Ilaoa always has weighed less than his fraternal twin, Jason, but never this much less. The way Jeremy sees things, it's better to be lighter than dead. Jeremy used to carry 215 pounds on his 6-2 frame, compared to Jason's 240. That was a fine weight for a 17-year-old junior playing strong safety for the high school football team in Walla Walla, Wash. Jason played defensive end and tight end. Now, Jeremy's down to 195. And he's happy about it, pacing the sidelines at Eagles training camp, the sun bouncing off his Eagles cap worn backward as he follows his host, Irving Fryar, with his soft brown eyes.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
The biggest change in gasoline since unleaded is coming soon to a service station near you, if it's not there already. The new gas is called RFG, for reformulated gas. The federal Clean Air Act of 1990 requires its use in the nine smoggiest U.S. cities - Philadelphia included. As of Jan. 1, every gas station in and near the city - South Jersey included - will be pumping cleaner-burning RFG. Many stations already are phasing it in. The new gas will put fewer toxic chemicals into the air than old gas. It will also cost more and give your car worse mileage.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Flying the A-6 fighter plane at 8,000 feet was much better than Nintendo or grossing out girls for Matt Repsher, an itchy 13-year-old from Springfield. "I felt like saying over the radio, 'This is your captain speaking,' " Matt said. Matt's chance at the controls came last week during his flight from the Willow Grove Naval Air Station to the Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia. It was the beginning of a three-day trip sponsored by Kids Inc., a nonprofit organization that fulfills the wishes of seriously ill children.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
A DARK WARNING Lest you think there's an easy way to combat the winter pallor beginning to afflict many of us, beware of tanning pills containing canthaxanthin. They could kill you, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center physician reports in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Available through tanning salons and advertisements, such pills are thought to have killed a previously healthy young woman whose skin turned orange after she took the drug and who came down with malaise, headaches, fatigue, weight loss and aplastic anemia - a frequently fatal deficiency of blood cells due to bone-marrow failure, the doctor says.
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