FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Anna Gradiz slipped through her background check with ease. And 8-year-old Tara is paying the price. Even though Gradiz had long-term psychological problems that could have prevented her from becoming a foster mother, the agency paid to screen people like her apparently failed to do its homework, interviews and various records suggest. Tara - who was released yesterday from St. Christopher's Hospital for Children - faces months of painful psychological and physical rehabilitation.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Isabel Maria Bonilla must hike more than 10 blocks to buy groceries from the nearest supermarket. Such a journey might not faze a younger woman. But Bonilla is 65. "I would like something that is not too far away," she said. "In Philadelphia, you need a car. " Now, a community group wants to bring a suburban-style supermarket almost to Bonilla's doorstep. The Asociacion De Puertorriquenos En Marcha (The Association of Puerto Ricans on the March) plans to build a 40,000-square-foot supermarket and retail complex on a site bounded by Germantown Avenue and 6th, Berks and Norris streets.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former president of a Blue Bell insurance brokerage accused by fellow executives of absconding with the company's money was charged in federal court yesterday with stealing $600,500 in cash and fleeing to the Cayman Islands in 1995. David G. Bockius, 33, back now and living in Springfield, claims the money was stolen from him in Jamaica, Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard W. Goldberg said after the charges were announced. The prosecutor said Bockius was arrested May 16 and released five days later after putting up a real-estate bond that included his house, his father's house and a 1964 Corvette.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Court papers in the bankruptcy filing of a Blue Bell insurance brokerage state that the firm's president, David G. Bockius, embezzled $650,000 in premiums from two insurance companies. And Bockius' attorney, who said his client was the subject of a federal criminal investigation, asserted yesterday that drugs were at the root of it all. "Unfortunately it's a tragic case," said A. Charles Peruto Sr., who is representing Bockius. "This is another one to be chalked up to falling prey to drugs.
NEWS
August 18, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesus M. Sierra Sr., 66, of Olney, a founder and former head of Asociacion de Puertorriquenos en Marcha, one of the largest housing and social-services organizations for Latinos in the state, died Sunday of heart failure at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Jesus created a great program for Latinos," said Nelson Diaz, a former Common Pleas Court judge and former city solicitor, now a Center City lawyer. "He started APM in a little storefront in North Philadelphia more than 30 years ago and accomplished more than anyone could ever expect.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By CHRISTINE OLLEY, olleyc@phillynews.com 215-854-5184
Almost 10,000 people from the region are expected to travel to Washington tomorrow to help draw attention to the need for more jobs and better education. The "One Nation Working Together" rally will be held at the Lincoln Memorial from noon to 4 p.m. and will include members of the Philadelphia NAACP and Asociacion Puertoriquenos en Marcha (APM), a Philadelphia-based Latino health, human-service and community-development agency. The rally is described as nonpartisan but is expected to draw more than 400 mostly liberal organizations, including the NAACP, APM, labor unions and gay-rights groups.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA At SEPTA's Temple University rail station, the rumble of trains fittingly drowned out Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. as he announced Monday that the city was in the running for a $30 million federal grant for neighborhood improvements. The SEPTA viaduct presents both a real and symbolic barrier to opportunities in the blocks around Temple University. To the west of the viaduct is the Temple economic juggernaut. To the east is a struggling North Philadelphia neighborhood feeling the pressure of gentrification.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Willie Mae Trapp and her extended family of seven live in a condemned apartment on 7th and York. Her rent is $265 a month. Here's what she gets: An unusable bathroom tub that until recently had been backed up with feces and water. The landlord had the contents removed last week, but the tub still doesn't drain. A kitchen floor that's caving in. Rats that have bitten her and her children, flies everywhere. Freezing cold in the winter, because a window is missing in one of the apartment's two rooms and the heater doesn't work.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Her horror began at birth. Now, nine years later, the girl known as Tara M. wants only a "mommy who won't burn me. " Her guardian is trying to make sure another foster child never has to make such a chilling wish. So a lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Tara's behalf late Tuesday, charging that the city's Department of Human Services and numerous other agencies and employees turned Tara over to a life of horror. Tara has lived in at least nine foster homes since birth.
NEWS
August 6, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
GROWING UP east of Temple University in North Philadelphia, amid frightening ethnic tensions and the blight of trash-filled vacant lots and boarded-up rowhouses, Nilda Ruiz was consumed by an urban dream: Why, she wondered, can't inner-city Puerto Ricans and African-Americans live in harmony in beautiful houses with gardens, just like the suburban families she glimpsed through car windows on trips along Routes 611 and 29 to visit friends?...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA At SEPTA's Temple University rail station, the rumble of trains fittingly drowned out Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. as he announced Monday that the city was in the running for a $30 million federal grant for neighborhood improvements. The SEPTA viaduct presents both a real and symbolic barrier to opportunities in the blocks around Temple University. To the west of the viaduct is the Temple economic juggernaut. To the east is a struggling North Philadelphia neighborhood feeling the pressure of gentrification.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Aiming to turn a part of North Philadelphia into a "community of opportunity," city leaders announced the opening Tuesday of a 120-unit housing complex that has earned a national honor for energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. At Ninth and Berks Streets, next to SEPTA's Temple University Regional Rail station, Mayor Nutter and other officials cut the ribbon on Paseo Verde, a "transportation-oriented" development. The three-story complex, whose name translates to "green walk," runs along Ninth from Berks to Norris Street.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By CHRISTINE OLLEY, olleyc@phillynews.com 215-854-5184
Almost 10,000 people from the region are expected to travel to Washington tomorrow to help draw attention to the need for more jobs and better education. The "One Nation Working Together" rally will be held at the Lincoln Memorial from noon to 4 p.m. and will include members of the Philadelphia NAACP and Asociacion Puertoriquenos en Marcha (APM), a Philadelphia-based Latino health, human-service and community-development agency. The rally is described as nonpartisan but is expected to draw more than 400 mostly liberal organizations, including the NAACP, APM, labor unions and gay-rights groups.
NEWS
August 6, 2010 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
GROWING UP east of Temple University in North Philadelphia, amid frightening ethnic tensions and the blight of trash-filled vacant lots and boarded-up rowhouses, Nilda Ruiz was consumed by an urban dream: Why, she wondered, can't inner-city Puerto Ricans and African-Americans live in harmony in beautiful houses with gardens, just like the suburban families she glimpsed through car windows on trips along Routes 611 and 29 to visit friends?...
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By NILDA RUIZ
LAST MONTH saw the release of the first annual Greenworks Philadelphia progress report, and we celebrated the city's move toward a greener, more sustainable future in my neighborhood at 9th and Norris. Mayor Nutter visited to report on the city's sustainability plan and tour many of the sustainability efforts led by Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha and the residents of eastern North Philadelphia. In just one year of the Greenworks program, neighborhoods across the city are starting to enjoy more green space and energy-efficient buildings and healthier citizens.
NEWS
April 3, 2007 | By Nilda Ruiz
Latinos are in the news, but often as voiceless victims, criminals or protesters. We are talked about, but it is extremely rare, particularly in mainstream media, that we are talked to. The constant drone of cable analysts and pundits on immigration, few of whom are Latino themselves, shed little light on the accomplishments and goals of millions of citizens of Hispanic origin. Like most Americans, Latinos work hard for themselves, their children, and their families' futures. Immigration is important and needs to be revamped in the United States because what we have is not working.
NEWS
August 18, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesus M. Sierra Sr., 66, of Olney, a founder and former head of Asociacion de Puertorriquenos en Marcha, one of the largest housing and social-services organizations for Latinos in the state, died Sunday of heart failure at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Jesus created a great program for Latinos," said Nelson Diaz, a former Common Pleas Court judge and former city solicitor, now a Center City lawyer. "He started APM in a little storefront in North Philadelphia more than 30 years ago and accomplished more than anyone could ever expect.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | by Earni Young, and Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writers
Philadelphia is cursed with abandoned buildings, trash-filled lots, abandoned cars, graffiti and the street crime such conditions attract. But the city is also blessed with some of the most aggressive "Blight Busters" ever to fight urban decay. A host of nonprofit, mostly city-funded groups are battling blight at the street level. Here are some of the success stories: Associacion de Puertorriquenos en Marcha. Eastern North Philadelphia has been sliding downward for four decades.
NEWS
February 28, 2000 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Just call them them the "Blight Busters. " Busting blight is what Associacion de Puertorriquenos en Marcha did when it replaced several blocks of ramshackle rowhomes and trash-filled lots with a tidy development of 42 two-story twins around Marshall and 6th streets. Although the first families moved in shortly before Christmas, APM formally opened its Taino Gardens rental community on Friday. The houses, targeted for low-income families, have backyards and off-street parking.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
It was business unusual at 5th and Berks streets yesterday as residents celebrated the completion of the area's first new supermarket in two decades. The Brown's Thriftway Supermarket will anchor the $5 million Borinquen Plaza, developed by the Asociacion de Puertorriquenos en Marcha Inc. (APM), a nonprofit neighborhood developer serving the Latino community. The neighborhood may be one of the city's poorest, but there's nothing marginal about the 44,000-square-foot superstore, which includes a sit-down cafe, in-store bakery and an animaltronics theater to provide music for customers sipping their espresso.
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