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Apnea

NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors are living off the grid on Windsor Park Lane in Havertown, powerless since Hurricane Irene's Saturday slap plunged large portions of the region into the 19th century. There was no milk for the new baby on the block, and no rest for the car salesman with sleep apnea. "Power envy" was setting in. Fans couldn't catch the Phillies games they craved. Concerned calls from relatives went unanswered on dead phones. And nearly all the ice cream has melted. Like 15,000 other Peco Energy customers in the area and 75,000 folks in New Jersey, several households on Windsor Park Lane were still without power Tuesday.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Q: I snore like a freight train every night, or so says my wife of 50 years. She's concerned I have sleep apnea. Should I see a doctor about it? A: Snoring occurs on a spectrum. While some people have occasional, quiet snoring, others experience loud, habitual snoring nearly every night or on most nights. In the frequent-snoring group, snoring may be an indication of an underlying sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea. Other symptoms of sleep apnea include: Choking or gasping during sleep.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The next time parents take their child for a medical checkup, they may be asked a new question: Does your child snore? The American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its member doctors to include questions about snoring as a way of identifying children who may have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Sleep apnea is marked by breathing interruptions and sleep disturbances, and in children it has been linked to a host of problems including hyperactivity, attention and learning difficulties, slower growth, and high blood pressure.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Erin McCarthy, For The Inquirer
Tonsil and adenoid removal improves a variety of symptoms in children with moderate sleep apnea, but "watchful waiting" also helped in some ways, a new study found. Overall, the surgery resulted in better sleep, less restlessness and impulsivity, and improved quality of life for most patients. But nearly half of children in the "watchful waiting" group also saw sleep improvements. No correlation was found between the surgery and improving attention and brain function. "If you ask me what, as a pediatrician, I would recommend to my patients . . . with sleep apnea, I would recommend surgery, because we saw many improvements," said Carole Marcus, a physician and director of the Sleep Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the study's first author.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tyrone Conner's heart was in such bad shape that he could barely walk up a flight of steps. "I felt like I was 80 years old," said Conner, 50, of Norristown. He also suffered from sleep apnea, snoring heavily and gasping for breath every night. What he did not initially realize was that the two problems were linked. Conner's physicians, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, made the connection, but many do not. Sleep apnea afflicts as many as 60 percent of patients with heart failure - the term for a weakened heart muscle that cannot keep up with the body's demands.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does my tongue look fat? Goofy as that query may sound, it could become an important part of the diagnosis, and maybe even the treatment, of sleep apnea in fat people, suggests a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. Obesity has long been recognized as a risk factor for sleep apnea, but the study is the first to point to the tongue as a likely culprit. It found that obese adults with the sleep disorder had bigger and fattier tongues than obese people without apnea.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: At the insistence of my husband (because of my loud snoring), I had a sleep study, which found that I have sleep apnea. I must admit I'm better rested in the morning using a CPAP mask. I always thought sleep apnea was a man's condition. How common is it in women? Answer: Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which patients' airways are obstructed many times during the night, is much more common in women than most folks would think. A recent Swedish study looked at 400 women from a population-based random sampling of 10,000 females between the ages of 20 and 70. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 50 percent of the women who answered a questionnaire and underwent an overnight monitored sleep study.
NEWS
February 6, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than two years, my snoring kept Laura awake most nights. It often got so loud that she used earplugs and buried her head under a pillow to escape the din. Nothing worked, and we were both exhausted. I felt guilty for ruining her sleep, and I blamed her for disturbing mine when she roused me several times a night to shut me up. Now I no longer snore and we both sleep better. Each night for the last seven weeks, I have worn a breathing mask so air can be pumped through my nose and control my sleep apnea.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is she dead or isn't she? Jahi McMath, 13, was declared brain-dead in December after her heart temporarily stopped during a tonsillectomy in Oakland, Calif. The tragedy drew national attention when the girl's mother, Nailah Winkfield, persuaded a judge in January to allow her to remove the body from the hospital, still on life support. The mother brought the girl to New Jersey, where the law allows a family to refuse to remove life support from brain-dead patients for religious reasons.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using caffeine to treat premature newborns for apnea - dangerous pauses in breathing during sleep - does not have long-term harmful effects on their sleep or breathing patterns, according to research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. But the new study also found that prematurity itself is a risk factor for sleep disorders years later. Children born preterm had high rates of obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movement during sleep, whether or not they had caffeine therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit.
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