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Apnea

NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Rep. Robert C. Donatucci, 58, who received 84 percent of the vote last week in being elected to his 16th House term, died asleep in his bed in South Philadelphia early Tuesday, his family said. His death was related to sleep apnea, for which he was being treated, said his brother Ronald, the city register of wills. Robert Donatucci, a Democrat who chaired the House Liquor Control Committee and was a collector of antique Chrysler cars, had been at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital about a week earlier for a sleep study, his brother said.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
Q: I snore like a freight train every night, or so says my wife of 50 years. She's concerned I have sleep apnea. Should I see a doctor about it? A: Snoring occurs on a spectrum. While some people have occasional, quiet snoring, others experience loud, habitual snoring nearly every night or on most nights. In the frequent-snoring group, snoring may be an indication of an underlying sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea. Other symptoms of sleep apnea include: Choking or gasping during sleep.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Erin McCarthy, For The Inquirer
Tonsil and adenoid removal improves a variety of symptoms in children with moderate sleep apnea, but "watchful waiting" also helped in some ways, a new study found. Overall, the surgery resulted in better sleep, less restlessness and impulsivity, and improved quality of life for most patients. But nearly half of children in the "watchful waiting" group also saw sleep improvements. No correlation was found between the surgery and improving attention and brain function. "If you ask me what, as a pediatrician, I would recommend to my patients . . . with sleep apnea, I would recommend surgery, because we saw many improvements," said Carole Marcus, a physician and director of the Sleep Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the study's first author.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The next time parents take their child for a medical checkup, they may be asked a new question: Does your child snore? The American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its member doctors to include questions about snoring as a way of identifying children who may have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Sleep apnea is marked by breathing interruptions and sleep disturbances, and in children it has been linked to a host of problems including hyperactivity, attention and learning difficulties, slower growth, and high blood pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: At the insistence of my husband (because of my loud snoring), I had a sleep study, which found that I have sleep apnea. I must admit I'm better rested in the morning using a CPAP mask. I always thought sleep apnea was a man's condition. How common is it in women? Answer: Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which patients' airways are obstructed many times during the night, is much more common in women than most folks would think. A recent Swedish study looked at 400 women from a population-based random sampling of 10,000 females between the ages of 20 and 70. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 50 percent of the women who answered a questionnaire and underwent an overnight monitored sleep study.
NEWS
February 6, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than two years, my snoring kept Laura awake most nights. It often got so loud that she used earplugs and buried her head under a pillow to escape the din. Nothing worked, and we were both exhausted. I felt guilty for ruining her sleep, and I blamed her for disturbing mine when she roused me several times a night to shut me up. Now I no longer snore and we both sleep better. Each night for the last seven weeks, I have worn a breathing mask so air can be pumped through my nose and control my sleep apnea.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old California girl whose parents refused to accept a finding of brain death, was honored for courage and perseverance Thursday night at the Union League by the family of Terri Schiavo. The McMath family went to court in December to oppose the removal of a ventilator and feeding tube even after three physicians determined that there was no brain function and a coroner issued a death certificate. A month later, the body of the girl - organs still working - was taken to an undisclosed medical facility, where the heart still beats.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dozen years ago, a major federal study shattered the deeply held belief that menopausal hormone therapy was the key to keeping women of a certain age healthy, sexy, and in good moods. By showing the therapy did more harm than good, the study shriveled up lucrative hormone sales, and set off a wave of lawsuits. Flash forward. It looks, as Yogi Berra said, like déjà vu all over again - this time for men. Even as female hormone replacement was collapsing, male hormone replacement was catching on. This wasn't because of convincing evidence that boosting testosterone helps men fight the toll of aging.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gene Wroblewski's rumbling snores kept his wife, Lorry, wide awake for years. In desperation, she finally sought refuge in a spare bedroom. Wroblewski, 67, of Doylestown, has sleep apnea, a serious medical condition characterized by loud snoring and pauses in breathing that last five to 60 seconds. About a month ago, he was fitted with a small dental device that has eased his breathing problem. Called a Herbst device after the German orthodontist who invented it, it was custom-made for Wroblewski by the Main Clinical Campus of Medical College Hospitals in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Lorraine Rocco, Special to The Inquirer
Snoring is no laughing matter. In fact, says Dr. Armando A. Montiel of Marlton, it sometimes can be fatal. But, because the person who snores excessively often is unaware of it, it is usually a spouse who brings the patient to see the doctor. So when Montiel hears a wife say to her husband, "Honey, keep quiet and let me tell the doctor all about it," he knows exactly what to expect next. "She'll say, 'He scares me . . . he snores loudly and then he stops breathing. He's grouchy and moody during the day, and he falls asleep at the drop of a hat. " These, say Montiel, are the classic symptoms of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the patient has repeated episodes of excessive snoring followed by a cessation of breathing.
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