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Apnea

NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
What do a French bulldog and a 3-year-old girl with atopic dermatitis have in common? Is there a tie between sleep apnea in an American bulldog and a 40-year-old obese man? What can human heart disease tell us about the heart problems of giant apes? These topics were among those tackled at the recent Zoobiquity 6 conference at the University of Pennsylvania, where about 200 physicians and medical students joined veterinarians to examine and reinforce the idea that, in some ways, there is no dividing line between human and animal medicine.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using caffeine to treat premature newborns for apnea - dangerous pauses in breathing during sleep - does not have long-term harmful effects on their sleep or breathing patterns, according to research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. But the new study also found that prematurity itself is a risk factor for sleep disorders years later. Children born preterm had high rates of obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movement during sleep, whether or not they had caffeine therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gene Wroblewski's rumbling snores kept his wife, Lorry, wide awake for years. In desperation, she finally sought refuge in a spare bedroom. Wroblewski, 67, of Doylestown, has sleep apnea, a serious medical condition characterized by loud snoring and pauses in breathing that last five to 60 seconds. About a month ago, he was fitted with a small dental device that has eased his breathing problem. Called a Herbst device after the German orthodontist who invented it, it was custom-made for Wroblewski by the Main Clinical Campus of Medical College Hospitals in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Lorraine Rocco, Special to The Inquirer
Snoring is no laughing matter. In fact, says Dr. Armando A. Montiel of Marlton, it sometimes can be fatal. But, because the person who snores excessively often is unaware of it, it is usually a spouse who brings the patient to see the doctor. So when Montiel hears a wife say to her husband, "Honey, keep quiet and let me tell the doctor all about it," he knows exactly what to expect next. "She'll say, 'He scares me . . . he snores loudly and then he stops breathing. He's grouchy and moody during the day, and he falls asleep at the drop of a hat. " These, say Montiel, are the classic symptoms of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the patient has repeated episodes of excessive snoring followed by a cessation of breathing.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Safeguard Scientific Inc., Wayne, said today it invested $20 million in NovaSom, a provider of portable diagnostic equipment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Safeguard's investment is the lead contribution in a total of $35 million that NovaSom received to fund growth. The Baltimore company's equipment allows patients to be tested for OSA at home instead of in a hospital. OSA is a condition in which a person has trouble breathing during sleep due to a blocked upper airway.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
A few years ago, I took care of a child who changed the way I practice pediatrics. His case underscored the need to ask one key question. "Does your child snore?" The child was 3, with no real medical problems, except that he was overweight. His mother brought him into my office concerned about his persistent cough and mentioned that he was also short of breath more often when he ran around. To help him sleep, the woman added, she had to put two pillows under his head. A physical exam showed fluid in the lower parts of his lungs.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Among his fellow cops, Bob Eddis was always known as the Energizer Bunny. But in 2011, the ebullient former Philadelphia officer was sagging. His diabetes doctors at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital sent him to see a liver specialist. After some additional tests, the former Fraternal Order of Police president got a shock: He had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that had progressed to cirrhosis of the liver. The news hit Eddis, now 62, hard. "I was distraught," he said.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Falling asleep almost killed Irving Lewis and his wife, Beatrice. While driving to visit their son on a rainy night about 10 years ago, Irving Lewis fell asleep at the wheel. The car careened off the road. The Lewises were lucky to walk away. This crash was not the only instance when falling asleep at an inappropriate time played havoc with the Lewises' lives. During the past 10 years, there have been countless other incidents that embarrassed, humiliated and endangered the couple.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
"To sleep, perchance to dream . . . " to wake up screaming or gasping for air, or maybe walking into a wall. Albert Wagmen and B. Franklin Diamond have seen several variations on the sleep theme at the Sleep Disorder Center at Abington Memorial Hospital. Since the center opened four months ago, the two neurologists have been trying to help their patients unravel the mysteries of sleep and find that golden slumber so touted by Shakespeare. Recently the two doctors were trying to discover if one of their colleagues has chronic apnea, a condition in which the patient has trouble breathing when in deep sleep.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cephalon Inc. received the backing yesterday of a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel to sell its narcolepsy drug, Provigil, to treat a broader range of sleep disorders, including one suffered by night-shift workers. Eight members of the committee voted to recommend to the FDA that use of Provigil be expanded to treat fatigued shift workers and to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which nighttime sleep is interrupted by irregular breathing. The FDA, which usually follows its advisory panels' recommendations, is expected to give the West Chester biopharmaceutical company a preliminary approval letter by Oct. 20 and final approval by the end of the year.
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