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Apnea

NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Lorraine Rocco, Special to The Inquirer
Snoring is no laughing matter. In fact, says Dr. Armando A. Montiel of Marlton, it sometimes can be fatal. But, because the person who snores excessively often is unaware of it, it is usually a spouse who brings the patient to see the doctor. So when Montiel hears a wife say to her husband, "Honey, keep quiet and let me tell the doctor all about it," he knows exactly what to expect next. "She'll say, 'He scares me . . . he snores loudly and then he stops breathing. He's grouchy and moody during the day, and he falls asleep at the drop of a hat. " These, say Montiel, are the classic symptoms of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the patient has repeated episodes of excessive snoring followed by a cessation of breathing.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
A few years ago, I took care of a child who changed the way I practice pediatrics. His case underscored the need to ask one key question. "Does your child snore?" The child was 3, with no real medical problems, except that he was overweight. His mother brought him into my office concerned about his persistent cough and mentioned that he was also short of breath more often when he ran around. To help him sleep, the woman added, she had to put two pillows under his head. A physical exam showed fluid in the lower parts of his lungs.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Safeguard Scientific Inc., Wayne, said today it invested $20 million in NovaSom, a provider of portable diagnostic equipment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Safeguard's investment is the lead contribution in a total of $35 million that NovaSom received to fund growth. The Baltimore company's equipment allows patients to be tested for OSA at home instead of in a hospital. OSA is a condition in which a person has trouble breathing during sleep due to a blocked upper airway.
SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE GENERAL feeling, after watching a couple of days of the Eagles' offense at the OTAs, is that the tempo might be even faster than it was last season. Watching them practice, it seems to run the fastest with Nick Foles at quarterback, and then with Matt Barkley, and then with Mark Sanchez - which only makes sense. But Foles can get them from whistle to snap in 15 seconds sometimes, and for a few consecutive plays at a time, 15, 15, 15. It is absurd. Some of it is a mindset. Some of it is superior conditioning, even at this point in the year.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Falling asleep almost killed Irving Lewis and his wife, Beatrice. While driving to visit their son on a rainy night about 10 years ago, Irving Lewis fell asleep at the wheel. The car careened off the road. The Lewises were lucky to walk away. This crash was not the only instance when falling asleep at an inappropriate time played havoc with the Lewises' lives. During the past 10 years, there have been countless other incidents that embarrassed, humiliated and endangered the couple.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
"To sleep, perchance to dream . . . " to wake up screaming or gasping for air, or maybe walking into a wall. Albert Wagmen and B. Franklin Diamond have seen several variations on the sleep theme at the Sleep Disorder Center at Abington Memorial Hospital. Since the center opened four months ago, the two neurologists have been trying to help their patients unravel the mysteries of sleep and find that golden slumber so touted by Shakespeare. Recently the two doctors were trying to discover if one of their colleagues has chronic apnea, a condition in which the patient has trouble breathing when in deep sleep.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cephalon Inc. received the backing yesterday of a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel to sell its narcolepsy drug, Provigil, to treat a broader range of sleep disorders, including one suffered by night-shift workers. Eight members of the committee voted to recommend to the FDA that use of Provigil be expanded to treat fatigued shift workers and to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which nighttime sleep is interrupted by irregular breathing. The FDA, which usually follows its advisory panels' recommendations, is expected to give the West Chester biopharmaceutical company a preliminary approval letter by Oct. 20 and final approval by the end of the year.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | By Eyobong Ita, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She watches through the screen door on Hoyt Terrace as friends she has made over 29 years pack up, preparing to move. Just two years ago, the Philadelphia Housing Authority moved Anna D. Powell-White and some other residents of Passyunk Homes from dilapidated units into refurbished townhouses in the South Philadelphia project. She loves the new place. It has become more than a home to her. It is, she says, the only place she can appreciate nature and talk with God. But today, Powell-White and 41 of her neighbors are angry.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late-night snoring got the family down? Sew a tennis ball into the back pockets of the pajamas of your chronic snorer to force him to sleep on his side. Or, with a doctor's permission, have him take a mild over-the-counter diet pill containing a mild stimulant. Those were two of the suggestions made yesterday by medical researchers attending a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia. Snoring, invariably the subject of humor, complaints and ridicule, was the topic of discussion during a symposium on "Snoring and Sleepiness.
SPORTS
December 28, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
NFL great Reggie White might have died because of a respiratory disease combined with other health problems, a preliminary autopsy report said yesterday. The Mecklenburg (N.C.) County Office of the Medical Examiner said White's death likely was caused by pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis, a disease of inflamed cells that can occur in various organs such as lungs, kidneys or eyes. The disease likely contributed to White's fatal cardiac arrhythmia, an irregular heart rhythm, the office said in a prepared statement.
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