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Apnea

NEWS
July 29, 2011
By Kelly Prill My mother had one of those old hair dryers that came in a hard plastic case with golden buckles. On the days Mom set her hair, she'd call for one of us to get the case and open it. She'd remove the cap, fit it over her curlers, and draw it tightly around her head. Coiled around the motor was a clear, flexible hose that Mom would plug into the cap. Then she would sit and wait for the blast of hot air to dry her hair. My sisters and I would gather round, our curiosity piqued by this beauty regimen, holding our unpolished fingernails above an air outlet on top of the motor labeled "Nail dryer.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
STATE REP. Robert Donatucci, a 30-year veteran of the General Assembly, died Monday night, apparently from complications due to sleep apnea. He was 58. Donatucci leaves behind a wife, Maria, and two children. Donatucci's brother, Philadelphia Register of Wills Ron Donatucci, said his younger brother was diagnosed with sleep apnea at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in August. Donatucci said his brother, as chairman of the state House Committee on Liquor Control, was preparing for hearings anticipated next year on Gov.-elect Tom Corbett's proposal to sell the state store system.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Loud snoring and insomnia used to be merely annoying. Now they are big business. In Philadelphia and across the country, sleep-diagnostic centers are popping up and people once aggravated by a lousy night's sleep are getting help. One beneficiary of the push for more testing is a local company, Viasys Healthcare Inc., which makes medical equipment including devices to diagnose and treat sleep ailments like sleep apnea, a condition in which breathing stops repeatedly for brief periods during sleep.
NEWS
February 6, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than two years, my snoring kept Laura awake most nights. It often got so loud that she used earplugs and buried her head under a pillow to escape the din. Nothing worked, and we were both exhausted. I felt guilty for ruining her sleep, and I blamed her for disturbing mine when she roused me several times a night to shut me up. Now I no longer snore and we both sleep better. Each night for the last seven weeks, I have worn a breathing mask so air can be pumped through my nose and control my sleep apnea.
NEWS
October 24, 2005 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
ZZ-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z Every body has to have it. And suddenly Americans seem desperate to get it. The search for deep, uninterrupted, refreshing sleep has become a national obsession. It's driving everything from the development of new prescription sleeping pills to extensive bed makeovers in hotel chains. In just 10 years, certified sleep clinics in the United States have nearly tripled - from 297 in 1995 to 883 so far this year, with more on the way. Sleep medicine has recently become an approved specialty and the number of sleep doctors is soaring - doubling in the last decade to 3,000 today.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cephalon Inc. said yesterday that it received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to sell its narcolepsy drug, Provigil, to treat a broader range of sleep disorders, including sleepiness suffered by night-shift workers. Provigil is now approved only for those who suffer from narcolepsy, a disorder in which people suddenly fall asleep during waking hours. In September, an FDA advisory panel recommended to the FDA that use of Provigil be expanded to treat fatigued shift workers whose shifts make it hard to stay awake on the job, and to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which nighttime sleep is interrupted by irregular breathing.
NEWS
September 29, 2003 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alex Buczala looked harmless enough as he sat quietly in a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia annex, expertly thumbing his Game Boy. But he was there, his parents said, because he was wreaking havoc on himself and them. The problem was sleep. Alex, a shy, freckled 7-year-old from Chester County, wasn't getting enough, and, as a consequence, neither were his parents, Sharon and Jim. First, he couldn't fall asleep by himself. He was afraid of monsters, so his father would sit with him in his well-lighted bedroom until he nodded off. Or Alex climbed into bed with his exhausted mother until he fell asleep and his father carried him to his own room.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The next time parents take their child for a medical checkup, they may be asked a new question: Does your child snore? The American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its member doctors to include questions about snoring as a way of identifying children who may have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Sleep apnea is marked by breathing interruptions and sleep disturbances, and in children it has been linked to a host of problems including hyperactivity, attention and learning difficulties, slower growth, and high blood pressure.
LIVING
September 14, 1998 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If your child's at the bottom of the class, the reason may be in his throat. A new study published in the journal Pediatrics found that removing a child's tonsils and adenoids can lead to better grades, presumably because the surgery allows for a better night's sleep. Enlarged tonsils and adenoids can lead to a condition called sleep apnea, in which breathing stops for short periods during sleep. Children in the study, who had been in the bottom 10 percent of their class and also had been diagnosed with sleep apnea, raised their grades from C-plus to B-minus in the year after their surgery, said David Gozal, a professor of pediatrics at Tulane University School of Medicine who conducted the research.
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