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Apnea

NEWS
May 22, 1997 | Daily News wire services
SAN FRANCISCO Report links snoring to auto accidents Men who habitually snore or have a hidden sleep disorder known as apnea get into three times as many auto accidents as the rest of the population, according to a major study released yesterday. And men and women with undiagnosed sleep apnea are seven times more likely to have multiple accidents, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin. Alarmingly, the risk exists whether or not the person feels drowsy, said Terry Young, author of the study and a professor at the university's school of preventive medicine.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphians who can't get a good night's sleep have plenty of places to turn for help. Eight hospitals in the city and suburbs treat sleep disorders, as do about a half a dozen in South Jersey. But although sleep problems have been studied here since the late 1970s, many people don't regard them as a valid medical condition until a crisis arises. Doctors say patients often don't seek treatment until they've fallen asleep at the wheel of a car, or on the job, or until a spouse delivers an ultimatum.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Carrying a toothbrush and change of clothes, Charles Woodard of Stratford was ready for one of the most important evenings of his life. Before his wife read a magazine article on sleep laboratories, he never expected that there would be a medical explanation for his problem. According to Woodard, his family has complained for the last five years that his snoring is so loud that it keeps them awake at night and that during the day, he simply cannot keep his eyes open. "I've stopped driving because I fall asleep at the wheel," he told Eva Morozsan, respiratory care director at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals/Stratford Division, which opened in 1981 as the first sleep laboratory in South Jersey.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Rip Van Winkle he wasn't. No matter how early Uyless Bradford tucked himself into bed, he never got a good, long sleep. The Willow Grove man, 37, had all the classic symptoms of sleep apnea. He had fallen asleep so often in school that he had been referred to special education classes. But in one sense, he was lucky. He was on the maintenance staff at Abington Memorial Hospital, which opened the area's first sleep disorders center three years ago. Co-workers who witnessed his daytime naps directed him to the center, which diagnosed his problem.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
For Charles Capella, a long-distance truck driver, sleeping on the job could be a dangerous practice. The Bristol resident, 43, learned to cope with his chronic drowsiness by pulling off to the side of the road for a nap. At home, he often dozed while watching television. Yet when he went to bed, he was restless. And when he slept, his snoring was so raucous that his wife had to move to another bedroom. "I was getting disgusted with him," Sandy Capella, his wife of 15 years, recalled recently.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
A judge who kept falling asleep on the bench . . . a Catholic priest who constantly dozed off and began snoring while hearing confessions . . . a casino pit boss who was about to be fired because he would fall asleep while counting hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of chips. Not to mention a financial analyst who was about to lose his job because he would nod off over his computer, and a government official who was about to be canned because he couldn't stay awake at important meetings.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
Jeanne Alper, mother of 2-month-old, dressed-in-pink Elizabeth Ann, doesn't mind when babies cry. "You know they're breathing when their screaming," said the Audubon mother with a rueful smile. While her comment might seem strange to outsiders, the group gathered recently at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees knew exactly what she meant. They are parents of infants afflicted with apnea, a temporary cessation of breathing that can result in crib death. At West Jersey, parents meet twice a month to discuss their experiences and hear speakers.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | By Eddie Olsen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kevin McKenna shrugged. "I feel deeply for the parents," McKenna said, shaking his head. "You can see the fear in their eyes. You know they feel helpless. I admire their courage. " This was at Cooper Hospital / University Medical Center in Camden, where McKenna discussed studies of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) last week. McKenna, Cooper's chief sleep-lab technician, has conducted hundreds of studies on babies since 1982. He is also the inventor of a new sleep- monitoring device that hospital officials consider a breakthrough in the study of SIDS.
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