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Appalachia

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NEWS
November 9, 1992 | by Denise Giardina, From the New York Times
Appalachian mountain communities are struggling for survival. For the past 12 years it has been easy for the rest of the country not to care. In the American imagination Appalachia always has been distinctly other. Mountain people are, it is assumed, a special case. We are simple throwbacks to the past, inhabitants of a land time forgot, lazy and shiftless, quick-tempered and ready to grab a gun to settle differences. The gray images of mountain poverty that dominated TV newscasts in the mid- 1960s still live today.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Charlotte Gunn-Golkin FOR THE INQUIRER
Kentucky's Cumberland Gap and the national historical park that surrounds it form a breathtakingly beautiful slice of America. Few scenes have left me as breathless as the seemingly countless stars poking holes in the dark blanket of night, impossibly high above the treetops. I spent four weeks in that park during August 2002. It wasn't a vacation in the typical sense; I was one of six teenage volunteers with the Student Conservation Association, a nonprofit organization that works with the National Park Service and runs volunteer trail restoration crews every summer, across the country.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Flight Behavior By Barbara Kingsolver HarperCollins. 448 pp. $28.99 Reviewed by Judith Musser   For fans of Barbara Kingsolver's fiction, Flight Behavior will be a pleasant return to a familiar setting with recognizable characters, memorable dialogue, common themes, and well-written prose that has become associated with a Kingsolver novel. As in Prodigal Summer , Kingsolver revisits Appalachia and re-creates a plot imbued with ecological and biological importance.
NEWS
July 8, 1996 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Appalachia has never had much political muscle, and Congress' plans to eliminate funding for Legal Services has the poor here fearful that their strongest weapon to fight cuts in welfare benefits will be blunted when they need it most. "It really is an attack," said John Rosenberg, who 25 years ago started a Legal Services agency in mountains where 30 percent of people live in poverty. "You cut people's benefits off, and you put them in the street, and then you leave them with no legal representation.
LIVING
November 29, 1999 | By Nancy Jalasca Randle, FOR THE INQUIRER
In a prosperous age of bull markets, billion-dollar mergers, and record-low unemployment, Rory Kennedy's American Hollow is a poignant reminder that there are those who continue to live on the economic edge. The award-winning documentary film, which will be shown tonight at 8 on premium cable channel HBO, chronicles a year in the lives of the 50-strong Bowling clan in Mudlick Hollow, a patch of rural Eastern Kentucky tucked between two mountains in one of Appalachia's poorest regions.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
SO, THE millionaire senators band together to deny extended unemployment benefits for the working poor if the rich don't continue to get their tax cuts. No surprise, but theirs is a conflict of interests, writ large. If they were honest, a lot of them would recuse themselves from voting on bills that line their own pockets. But, they aren't. If they were Christians, as a lot of them profess to be, they'd show some charity to those less fortunate. They must not be Christians. If they were patriots, they'd act in the best interests of the country as a whole and not just those who enable their predations.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Three years ago this Sunday, the life of Francis Bible Schulte, a Philadelphia priest, took on a dramatic change. It was on that day that Father Schulte, urban-bred and Jesuit-educated, was named bishop of the sprawling Diocese of Wheeling, W.Va., there to serve the Lord amid the breathless beauty and tragic poverty of Appalachia. The elevation and assignment were something that Father Schulte, the only child of a North Philadelphia druggist, never imagined. When Frankie Schulte was a boy in North Philadelphia, he spent many a happy hour in his dad's drugstore on Lehigh Avenue, just down the street from old Shibe Park.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The felled poplars and oaks resembled piles of brittle whisk brooms as Damon Morgan stuffed his hands into bib overalls and simmered in mountain anger over what bulldozers and chain saws have wrought on the knobs and steep slopes of his childhood. "What hurts me is the size they're cutting," said Morgan, who brews tea from the bark of cherry birch and watches over these mountains from the zip-down plastic windows of his Jeep. "A lot of these trees aren't much thicker than your leg. The forest cannot last.
NEWS
December 28, 1995 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Mike Chowning is a New Age circuit rider: a clergyman who brought the Bible and the Internet to these gnarled mountains where mention of cyberspace draws squint-eyed puzzlement from Appalachia's miners and loggers. "When I arrived here two years ago, I set up a computer bulletin board. It was the only one in a 50-mile radius," said Father Chowning, a Franciscan with a data bank of 28 CD-ROMs. "Most people here have limited knowledge of computers. The phone lines are bad, and there's no local access to the Internet.
NEWS
February 15, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Mum Puppettheatre artistic director Robert Smythe is back on Philadelphia's theatrical radar. This time around, he's a Temple University MFA student premiering an adaptation of Ram?n del Valle-Incl?n's Divine Words. As one expects, there are some puppets. Less expected - to those unfamiliar with Valle-Incl?n's style of grotesquerie - one of them is a well-endowed dwarf whose face is eaten by wild pigs. Consider yourself warned. A contemporary of Lorca and devotee of Goya, Valle-Incl?n (1866-1936)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Flight Behavior By Barbara Kingsolver HarperCollins. 448 pp. $28.99 Reviewed by Judith Musser   For fans of Barbara Kingsolver's fiction, Flight Behavior will be a pleasant return to a familiar setting with recognizable characters, memorable dialogue, common themes, and well-written prose that has become associated with a Kingsolver novel. As in Prodigal Summer , Kingsolver revisits Appalachia and re-creates a plot imbued with ecological and biological importance.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Dan Sewell, Associated Press
MOUNT ORAB, Ohio - It's winter, so Donna Robirds puts on two sweaters in the morning and keeps heavy blankets handy as she sets her thermostat low - 60 at night - and bundles up to keep her utility bill down. At 67, with a fixed income and a $563-a-month mortgage, she lives on a tight budget. Food stamps help the retired state employee stretch her budget in this Appalachian village. So has the mild winter. "We haven't had the extreme cold, so it hasn't been too bad," she said.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
SO, THE millionaire senators band together to deny extended unemployment benefits for the working poor if the rich don't continue to get their tax cuts. No surprise, but theirs is a conflict of interests, writ large. If they were honest, a lot of them would recuse themselves from voting on bills that line their own pockets. But, they aren't. If they were Christians, as a lot of them profess to be, they'd show some charity to those less fortunate. They must not be Christians. If they were patriots, they'd act in the best interests of the country as a whole and not just those who enable their predations.
NEWS
February 15, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Mum Puppettheatre artistic director Robert Smythe is back on Philadelphia's theatrical radar. This time around, he's a Temple University MFA student premiering an adaptation of Ram?n del Valle-Incl?n's Divine Words. As one expects, there are some puppets. Less expected - to those unfamiliar with Valle-Incl?n's style of grotesquerie - one of them is a well-endowed dwarf whose face is eaten by wild pigs. Consider yourself warned. A contemporary of Lorca and devotee of Goya, Valle-Incl?n (1866-1936)
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Charlotte Gunn-Golkin FOR THE INQUIRER
Kentucky's Cumberland Gap and the national historical park that surrounds it form a breathtakingly beautiful slice of America. Few scenes have left me as breathless as the seemingly countless stars poking holes in the dark blanket of night, impossibly high above the treetops. I spent four weeks in that park during August 2002. It wasn't a vacation in the typical sense; I was one of six teenage volunteers with the Student Conservation Association, a nonprofit organization that works with the National Park Service and runs volunteer trail restoration crews every summer, across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
To dramatize the awe and excitement that attended the discovery of something we now take for granted is a deceptively difficult task, which Maggie Greenwald manages with pleasing aplomb in Songcatcher. A story about tracing the roots of Appalachian folk music may not seem the most promising material, but Greenwald's film is filled with an infectious love for the region's songs. It could hardly be otherwise, given the level of musical talent she recruited for Songcatcher. The movie, set in 1907, follows the familiar trajectory in which a journey of discovery becomes a means of self-exploration and growth.
SPORTS
June 22, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Some players shun the Carpenter Cup because they'd rather spend a week at the shore, or someplace more exotic. Infielder Ed Turner, of St. Joseph's Prep, earned a spot last year on the Catholic League's Cup roster as a coaches' first-team All-Catholic pick, but his face was not in Veterans Stadium. Don't down him. Don't think he has only a lukewarm interest in baseball. Turner was serving his country. Part of it, anyway. A rather bleak part. "I was in Appalachia on a service trip with Prep kids," he said.
LIVING
November 29, 1999 | By Nancy Jalasca Randle, FOR THE INQUIRER
In a prosperous age of bull markets, billion-dollar mergers, and record-low unemployment, Rory Kennedy's American Hollow is a poignant reminder that there are those who continue to live on the economic edge. The award-winning documentary film, which will be shown tonight at 8 on premium cable channel HBO, chronicles a year in the lives of the 50-strong Bowling clan in Mudlick Hollow, a patch of rural Eastern Kentucky tucked between two mountains in one of Appalachia's poorest regions.
NEWS
July 7, 1999
It's a lot easier to share the American dream with all Americans, including the millions stuck in poverty, when the economy's humming. That's the starting point for President Clinton's fly-around this week from Appalachia to the Mississippi Delta to Watts. The President knows the jarring juxtapositions. The unemployment rate is under 5 percent, the stock market is setting records, and the government can almost pay its bills without raiding Social Security. Yet one out of every five children is living in poverty, and the poverty rate for blacks and Hispanics is twice the national average.
LIVING
August 6, 1996 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The jobless men come every day, finding shade against the brick courthouse and sitting until dusk, when their cigarette embers linger with the fireflies that float down from the foothills and over the tobacco fields. And every day, just beyond their smoke and their lazy stories, Stella Marshall pushes open the door to her office, hoping for a miracle, but depending on whatever little things the Lord sends her way - second-hand clothes for a poor child, donations for a family beset by rats and a rickety roof.
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