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NEWS
March 27, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis Quinn talked about his brother to a group of mostly strangers. He spoke in a matter-of-fact way made easier by the passage of 18 months: "Kyle Quinn was my younger brother, and he was murdered at Kutztown University. " That cold reality was delivered over omelets and hot coffee at a breakfast meeting of the Horsham Rotary earlier this month. Later, it was the unavoidable truth underlying a visit to fifth graders at a Warminster school. Dennis Quinn tells the story with what seems like an emotional ease, but in his case, the demeanor doesn't signify acceptance.
SPORTS
July 18, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this tired river town - 15 miles north of Harrisburg, on the west bank of the Susquehanna - there are several churches, two laundromats, a couple of bars and an old brick boarding house called the Doyle Hotel. There are 23 rooms in the three-story hotel and about half of them are occupied, in the words of the proprietress, "by permanent guests, fellas in town who don't have families. " The rest of the rooms, this time of year, are occupied by Appalachian Trail hikers, who seek hot showers and cheap beer.
NEWS
January 2, 2005 | By Calvin Cobb Jr. FOR THE INQUIRER
Bubbling springs forcing their way through rock, scenic vistas, and good fellowship are all just parts of a hike along the trail - the Appalachian Trail, that is. No, we didn't "through hike" the 2,000-plus miles that many trek from Georgia to Maine, but we hiked about a 50-mile section across Maryland, including side trails. My 21-year-old son, Brandon, and I backpacked this beautiful section of the trail over the summer. Traveling south from the Pennsylvania border, we entered Pen Mar Park with its beautiful view off the western side of the park.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE WAS nothing more Michael Sparks and Kelly Quain could do, so they grabbed their gear and hiked down a trail without their friend, the weight of what just happened too unreal to weigh them down yet. It was Sunday morning, and they were heading out from the Washington County, Md., shelter where Philadelphia folk singer Jason Parish, 36, had just been killed by a fallen tree, and the two men stumbled upon something strange, stuck in the mud....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1987 | By Dorothy Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe it was the promise of lunch and granola bars at the top that encouraged the children to race ahead. Or perhaps it was the adventure of hunting for butterflies and toads along the way. Or it might have been the age-old challenge of getting to the top that made them hustle. Whatever the reason, our family hike up to the Pinnacle, one of the most spectacular lookouts on the Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania, was one of those amazing days. The children didn't complain, and the grown-ups got some peace and quiet.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Caught in an early spring storm, Rick Maerker and Sam Beyer trekked toward a log shelter miles ahead, high in the mountains of North Carolina. The winds blew the snow sideways and elbowed them off the trail. The winds whited out their vision and dropped already-freezing temperatures off the wind-chill charts. Walking produced enough body heat to survive. To stop was to die. They reached the shelter and awoke the following morning to a misty forest sanctuary blanketed white.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A hiker's cellular phone brought a rescue crew to the aid of a 14-year-old Blue Bell boy who suffered an apparent asthma attack while climbing one of the highest mountains in New England, authorities in Rumford, Maine, said yesterday. David Andrew O'Hara was a couple of hours into a four-day hike along the Appalachian Trail from Maine to New Hampshire on Sunday night when he became short of breath and his arms went numb, said Paul Fournier, spokesman for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
His legs a mass of red welts and cuts, one of his ribs broken, a blind man is stumbling down the precipitous 500-foot drop of a trail not far from here, tripping on rocks, feeling his way with a green ski pole. His guide dog, Orient, usually leads on harness 18 inches ahead of his master, but the rocks are too sharp here even for the big German shepherd's paws. So Orient is bounding down the incline, leaping six and eight feet at a time, pulling the blind man tumbling down after him. Later, after the day's 15-mile hike, the man will sit in a small hotel room near here, slip his size-14 feet into soft dry slippers - the feet battered, the toenails falling off for a third time - and humbly discuss his quest to become the first blind person to conquer the entire Appalachian Trail, 2,146 rugged miles from Georgia to Maine.
NEWS
August 1, 2010
A caption in the Sunday Travel section misstates the first name of Earl Shaffer, considered the first person to hike the entire Appalachian Trail in one season. The section was printed in advance. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.
NEWS
May 3, 2016
ISSUE | FOREST TRAILS Help on the way? The National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act (House Bill 845) would address the growing backlog of maintenance needed in our national forests. If passed, this legislation would keep more trails open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteers and partner organizations - a wonderful solution to a persistent problem. Democrats and Republicans in Washington don't agree on much, but they agree that this bipartisan bill would do a lot of good.
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NEWS
May 3, 2016
ISSUE | FOREST TRAILS Help on the way? The National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act (House Bill 845) would address the growing backlog of maintenance needed in our national forests. If passed, this legislation would keep more trails open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteers and partner organizations - a wonderful solution to a persistent problem. Democrats and Republicans in Washington don't agree on much, but they agree that this bipartisan bill would do a lot of good.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"A WALK in the Woods" is a so-so comedy, but it does restore a wholesome normalcy to the idea of traversing the Appalachian Trail. This was undone a few years back by South Carolina governor Mark Sanford, who cheated on his wife and lamely covered for it by claiming to be "hiking the Appalachian Trail. " Sanford ruined things for guys like me, who actually make use of the Appalachian Trail and found ourselves operating under the taint of suspicion. Thanks to Sanford, if I actually wanted to hit the trail, I had to lie and say I was going to Delilah's.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE WAS nothing more Michael Sparks and Kelly Quain could do, so they grabbed their gear and hiked down a trail without their friend, the weight of what just happened too unreal to weigh them down yet. It was Sunday morning, and they were heading out from the Washington County, Md., shelter where Philadelphia folk singer Jason Parish, 36, had just been killed by a fallen tree, and the two men stumbled upon something strange, stuck in the mud....
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
At the University of Chicago, Ginny Too was "the Asian girl with glasses hanging out at the library. " She was neither athletic nor outdoorsy. "It was never part of my upbringing," she says. How things have changed. Too, now 34, a McKinsey consultant who lives in Center City, has climbed three challenging mountains: Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Cotopaxi in Ecuador, and Mount Whitney in California. More impressive, the "geek" who graduated Phi Beta Kappa has hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail and, for good measure, America's two other long-distance trails, the Pacific Crest Trail and the Continental Divide Trail.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2014 | By Steve Gallagher, For The Inquirer
In March, I flew to Georgia to embark on an epic adventure to hike the Appalachian Trail. It was an amazing experience on which I met interesting and inspirational people and gazed upon breathtaking vistas very few people will ever see. It was not all sunny days and effortless descents, however. After about two months and 500 miles, I decided to end my journey. It was a combination of nagging injuries and a realization that trail life wasn't for me, at least not four more months of it. Reading the "Personal Journey: Learning if a bear sniffs in the woods" article posted to philly.com on Sept.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia and its suburbs are slowly making good on an ambitious plan to build a 750-mile network of biking and walking paths throughout the region. Mayor Nutter last week opened a 12-foot-wide, 1.6-mile-long asphalt sidewalk along North Delaware Avenue through the industrial heartland of Port Richmond, and this month, Chester County will open a seven-mile segment of the Chester Valley Trail along Route 202 near Chesterbrook. A $10 million, 2,000-foot-long concrete "boardwalk" being built out into the Schuylkill will extend the Schuylkill River Trail from Locust Street to the South Street Bridge in 2014.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
Dozens injured at Va. parade DAMASCUS, Va. - An elderly driver plowed into dozens of hikers marching in a Saturday parade in a small Virginia mountain town, and investigators were looking into whether he suffered a medical emergency before the accident. About 50 to 60 people suffered injuries ranging from critical to superficial, but no fatalities were reported. Three of the worst injured were flown by helicopter to area hospitals. Another 12 to 15 victims were taken to hospitals by ambulance, and the rest were treated at the scene.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Bruce Smith, Associated Press
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Former Republican South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford revived a scandal-scarred political career by winning back his old congressional seat Tuesday in a district that had not elected a Democrat in three decades. The comeback was complete when he defeated Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch, the sister of political satirist Stephen Colbert. With 87 percent of the precincts reporting, Sanford had 54 percent of the vote. Sanford, who turns 53 later this month, has never lost a race in three runs for Congress and two for governor.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ian Sarmento thought he was ready to walk the 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail from the Mexican border to Canada. After all, hadn't he already hiked the 2,184 miles of the Appalachian Trail? The Chester County 21-year-old had made that trek as a teenager, without compass, GPS, or locator beacon, which beams a hiker's location to a satellite and down to authorities. Not even a cellphone. So in May, he set out to do it again, on the big daddy of Western trails. He wanted to confront nature with a natural tool kit - his wits.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Wilson Ring, Associated Press
WEYBRIDGE, Vt. - One of the longest hiking trails in the United States stops 40 miles short of its most famous cousin, but a group is trying to bridge that gap. The North Country National Scenic Trail runs 4,600 miles from North Dakota to New York's eastern border. From there, it's about 40 miles across Vermont fields and mountains to the Appalachian Trail, the 2,170-mile hiking trail that runs from Georgia to Maine. Seeking to bring them together are a push from the organization that runs the North Country Trail; a changed attitude from officials in Vermont, where the connection was blocked decades ago; and a growing movement to connect the nation's longest hiking trails.
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