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Apparel Industry

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BUSINESS
May 4, 1992 | By Tawn Nhan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Philadelphia native Regina Marucci, the city's knitting mills were always more than just providers of jobs. Not only did the mills put food on the table and pay the bills, they also taught her about hard work, pride and independence, attitudes that pushed her children to graduate from college and helped her survive the death of her husband almost two decades ago. But now, the 77-year-old Marucci, who has made button loops and mended sweaters...
BUSINESS
October 24, 1995 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deb Shops Inc., seeking to offset losses brought on by flagging interest in women's apparel, has entered the book business, buying Atlantic Book Shops Inc., of Montgomeryville, for $4.7 million in cash. The deal, made Friday, was announced yesterday. Atlantic has distinguished itself from other retailers by selling used books, publishers' overstocks and hard-to-find titles at steep discounts. Founder Martin Simon, now 72, started by selling used books to department stores, and today the chain includes book warehouses in Montgomeryville, Cherry Hill and Dover, Del., and 11 retail stores in resort areas in New Jersey and Delaware.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a 35-year career in the apparel industry, Frederick Gillette worked for seven companies before landing at Artex Knitting Mills Inc. eight years ago. Not that he is a job-hopper. "They all went out of business," Gillette said of his previous employers as he slipped a spool of black yarn onto a creel on one of Artex's 100 knitting machines, whose humming fills the South Jersey factory. For Gillette, 61, and many of his colleagues who make up Artex's 90-person unionized workforce, the Westville, Gloucester County, producer of knit hats and scarves has become a refuge.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The once-booming apparel industry in Philadelphia suffered another in a long series of setbacks with the foreclosure this month of the Good Lad Co. As a result of the July 6 foreclosure, manufacturing of children's clothing by the once-prosperous Kensington firm will stop this fall. The company that had employed as many as 500 union workers will become a distribution center for imported clothing that may hire up to 140 people. "It is too early to predict whether the [new] investor will be able to turn around what had been an ailing business," said a statement released through David S. Lorry, an attorney representing the former owners.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | By Tawn Nhan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Employees at the Good Lad Co. probably had a better Christmas than some of their competitors in the area's apparel-manufacturing industry. Besides having a holiday party, the 600 employees at the children's clothing-maker got two weeks off with pay. But perhaps the best gift was the assurance that their jobs would be there when they returned from the holiday: Good Lad will be in business for another year. The 46-year-old company is one of an increasingly small circle of survivors in Philadelphia's apparel industry.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
A Philadelphia apparel manufacturer has been awarded a $322,768 low- interest loan from a Pennsylvania Department of Commerce-administered fund created to modernize the area's clothing industry. The Leonard Corp., an emblem manufacturer at 321 E. Allegheny Ave., received the money at a 4 percent interest rate last month after Commerce Bank/Pennsylvania lent the company a matching amount at 9 percent, said Frank C. Nuciforo, a spokesman for the Council for Labor and Industry, a quasi- public agency that administers the state loan program locally.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Albert Nipon has sold his family-held, high-fashion company to the Leslie Fay Cos. in New York for an undisclosed sum, executives of both firms announced late yesterday. John Pomerantz, chairman and chief executive of Leslie Fay, said he is "thrilled" with the acquisition, which "gives us what we've been looking for - entry into the designer business with a new and better level of clothing. " Albert Nipon, who with his wife Pearl, founded the Nipon firm that is headquartered at Broad and Wallace streets, said Nipon will be an autonomous division of Leslie Fay. Local operations and the company's staff of 250 to 300 people here won't be affected, Nipon said.
NEWS
September 17, 1986 | By HERBERT LONDON, From the New York Times
Bob Hope, Carol Channing, Sammy Davis Jr. and other celebrities have television spots in which they point with pride to products "Made in the U.S.A. " Here is an unabashed attempt to convince consumers to buy products made at home. The appeal is old-fashioned flag-waving. To my astonishment, there is evidence that it works. A summer survey found that 80 percent of the respondents said they had viewed the commercial, and one-third of these people went on to buy American-made garments.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The apparel industry is in tatters, undone by foreign imports, by GATT, and by consumers who accept the notion of "dress" blue jeans. A lost cause. So it's perhaps surprising that DuPont Co., the Wilmington chemical giant, is forging into the brave old world of garment-making. "It does sound a little on the bizarre side," said Thom Brown, an analyst who follows DuPont for Rutherford Brown & Catherwood, a Philadelphia securities firm. Long a leader in the development and sale of fibers used in apparel, the company is creating a subsidiary in the West Chester area to manufacture women's sportswear and separates.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The May 27 editorial "Protectionist trade bill is exercise in self- deception" is itself an exercise in self-deception. Without apparent knowledge of the trade issue and using worn-out shibboleths, you summarily dismiss any action on trade issues by Congress. The answer to the trade question, you argue, "must come from American business and industry, management and labor knuckling down to meet the competitive challenge from abroad. " While this concept may sound good and may even have merit, to use it as a generalization flies in the face of reality.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Red tape? Wayne Mills Co. Inc. thrives on it. Not the torturous-regulation kind, but the thin woven ties behind the expression "cut through the red tape. " Last year, Wayne Mills supplied more than 100,000 yards of it, used mostly in courthouses and law offices to bind official documents. The 104-year-old North Philadelphia weaver of narrow fabrics has had that line of business since the 1940s. Not that this manufacturer of rare longevity is a one-trick loom. Housed in a redbrick complex with Southern yellow pine floors and wood-beam ceilings across the tracks from SEPTA's Wayne Junction station, Wayne Mills exists now - into the sixth generation of its founding family, the Milneses - because, like the yarn it weaves, it has remained pliable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Vikki Ortiz Healy, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Sophia Saverese attended her first day of kindergarten last week wearing a delicate floral print dress, ballet flats, and a bow in her hair, no thanks to the displays at the mall promoting glittery miniskirts, wedge sandals, and one-shouldered tank tops in kiddie sizes. "She did see the other stuff, and she picked it out and said she liked it," said Nicole Saverese, the Glen Ellyn, Ill., mother of three who, with her mother-in-law's help, steered Sophia away from the adult styles during a recent shopping trip.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago, Philadelphia's apparel industry employed 20,000 people. Today, the industry has virtually disappeared, with just 2,000 workers scattered among niche players. Amid the wreckage, a local company stands out: Fishman & Tobin Inc. Founded by immigrants 90 years ago in South Philadelphia, the firm had to make tough decisions about what to make and where to make it. It expanded into the southeast in the 1960s, entered Latin America in the 1970s, and now makes makes clothing in 22 countries.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a 35-year career in the apparel industry, Frederick Gillette worked for seven companies before landing at Artex Knitting Mills Inc. eight years ago. Not that he is a job-hopper. "They all went out of business," Gillette said of his previous employers as he slipped a spool of black yarn onto a creel on one of Artex's 100 knitting machines, whose humming fills the South Jersey factory. For Gillette, 61, and many of his colleagues who make up Artex's 90-person unionized workforce, the Westville, Gloucester County, producer of knit hats and scarves has become a refuge.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The once-booming apparel industry in Philadelphia suffered another in a long series of setbacks with the foreclosure this month of the Good Lad Co. As a result of the July 6 foreclosure, manufacturing of children's clothing by the once-prosperous Kensington firm will stop this fall. The company that had employed as many as 500 union workers will become a distribution center for imported clothing that may hire up to 140 people. "It is too early to predict whether the [new] investor will be able to turn around what had been an ailing business," said a statement released through David S. Lorry, an attorney representing the former owners.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
For Victor Jaramillo and his family, NAFTA has been a gateway to the American dream. For Teodoro Guido, the treaty has become a Mexican nightmare. The North American Free Trade Agreement helped Jaramillo, a Mexican native, start his own business in the United States. His Red & Hot Produce, based in this border town, is an importer and distributor of dried hot pepper and other crops grown in his home state of Zacatecas in central Mexico. "The mentality is different here because only good merchandise sells," he said.
SPORTS
July 30, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Larry Hughes couldn't have known what he was doing when he walked into a tattoo parlor before his senior year in high school carrying a logo from the Main Line company AND 1. To say that he did would suggest he was clairvoyant. Hughes just liked the company's logo, "The Player," a picture of a faceless, raceless, muscled player driving to the net with a basketball in his hand, and he wanted it on his right arm. "It was a spur-of-the-moment thing," Hughes said. "I had seen it. I liked the way it looked.
LIVING
March 31, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Oh, the celebrity arrivals. Elizabeth Hurley in a one-button pantsuit that flashed cleavage and tummy, boyfriend Hugh Grant in tow. Oscar nominee Minnie Driver in a black fat-free sheath. Whitney Houston in a jacket with satin lapel, all huggy with hubby Bobby Brown. Woody Allen in his usual geeky getup - blazer, cotton shirt, chinos - accompanied by new bride Soon-Yi, who wore a crystal-pleated tent dress that immediately started rumors that she was pregnant. And on it went - Lenny Kravitz, Mira Sorvino, k.d. lang, rappers Puff Daddy and Lil' Kim. Was it the Oscars?
BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Americans want something, they want it now. And business has responded promptly with everything from fast food for the appetite to liposuction for over-indulgence. Soon, the nation's apparel industry might just follow suit. A custom blouse or suit cut to your exact body measurements? It'll be ready for you in a few days, a few hours - minutes, even. Students studying fashion-apparel management at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science got to glimpse their industry's future yesterday - a high-tech wonderworld driven by such oxymoronic concepts as "mass customization.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1997 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is the latest brouhaha at the Smithsonian Institution the son of Enola Gay? Or is the debate enveloping a planned exhibition on sweatshops "a little hiccup," as a National Museum of American History official is suggesting? In recent days, the museum has come under fire from representatives of the apparel industry, who have withdrawn their participation from a show called "Between a Rock and a Hard Place: A Dialogue on American Sweatshops, 1820-Present. " The show is scheduled to open in Washington in April.
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