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BUSINESS
December 8, 2012 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Apple spoiled the stock market's party on Friday. Stocks shot higher in the early morning, after the government reported that the United States added jobs in November. But Apple Inc., which has been flailing in recent weeks as investors wonder how long its momentum can continue, dragged down certain indexes. The Dow Jones industrial average, which doesn't include Apple, rose 81.09, or 0.6 percent, to close at 13,155.13. The Standard & Poor's 500 and Nasdaq, which do, were less impressive.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Apple briefly surpassed Exxon Mobil yesterday as the nation's most valuable company. The iPhone and iPad maker had the lead for much of the afternoon before its stock closed just behind Exxon's. The two companies are so close that Apple is likely to keep the top spot soon. Apple Inc.'s stock gained 5.9 percent to $374.01 yesterday, bringing its market capitalization to about $347 billion. Exxon Mobil Corp.'s stock, meanwhile, closed up 2.1 percent at $71.64.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Computerware Inc. has been chosen by Apple's education division as its exclusive sales organization for all Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware school districts. "Our education team worked long and intense hours to deliver the best proposal to Apple," said John Kovalcik, president of Computerware, noting that there was heavy competition. As Apple's representative in the area, Computerware will offer consulting and technology planning services, as well as increased support, service and configuration options, to education customers.
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Makes 13/4 quarts 2 quarts apple cores and peels 2 quarts water 1/3 cup sugar 1. Put the apple cores and peels in a large glass or ceramic bowl. Dissolve the sugar in the water and pour over the cores and peels. Cover with a plate and weight down with something heavy to keep the solids submerged. Cover the entire bowl with cheesecloth or a kitchen towel and leave on the counter out of direct sunlight for 7 days. 2. Strain the cores and peels from the liquid and discard the solids.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes a generous 2 cups 1/2 teaspoon nigella seed (also called kalonji or black onion seed) 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed 2 crisp green apples, such as Granny Smith Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon Generous pinch sugar, or as needed Pinch sea salt, or as needed 11/4 cups plain, low-fat Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped mint 1. Lightly toast the nigella, cumin, and fennel...
FOOD
August 5, 1987 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I baked blueberry muffins with Jiffy Muffin Mix and they were good, but on the box it says "imitation blueberries. " What in the world are imitation blueberries? Mary Solek Tuckerton, N.J. A. Ruth Stone of the Chelsea Milling Company's customer relations department tells us that the blueberries in the mix are actually little bits of apples which are flavored and colored to look and taste like blueberries. Why does Jiffy do this? Two reasons are given. "An apple," says Stone, "is a very nutritious and healthful food, and we chose that from which to make our blueberries for that reason.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
BEIJING - Apple issued an apology to Chinese consumers Monday after government media attacked its repair policies for two weeks in a campaign that reeked of economic nationalism. A statement Apple posted in Chinese on its website Monday said the complaints had prompted "deep reflection" and convinced the company of the need to revamp its repair policies, boost communication with Chinese consumers and strengthen oversight of authorized resellers. The ruling party's flagship newspaper, People's Daily , had accused Apple of arrogance, greed and exploiting the Chinese consumer.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2012 | By Peter Svensson, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Apple said Monday that an independent group, the Fair Labor Association, had started inspecting working conditions in the Chinese factories where its iPads and iPhones are assembled. Amid growing criticism over labor and environmental practices - especially in China - Apple last month for the first time disclosed a list of suppliers for its gadgets. The Fair Labor team began the inspections Monday at Foxconn City in Shenzhen, China, Apple said. The complex employs and houses hundreds of thousands of workers.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me," says Apple head honcho Tim Cook in a new essay in Bloomberg Businessweek. Well, he may be proud, but he never acknowledged it publicly before. He said that announcing it "wasn't an easy choice. " May we someday have a world in which it's easy. As it is, some behind-the-timesers, I guess, have their knickers in a bunch. Cook is now one of the highest-ranking businesspeople of self-acknowledged same-sex orientation.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Jordan Robertson and Adam Satariano, Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. and the FBI denied claims by hackers who said they stole information on 12 million Apple Inc. user accounts from an FBI computer. Many of the hackers' claims were posted this week in a long, online missive from the group calling itself Anonymous. The FBI said in a statement Tuesday that there was "no evidence indicating that an FBI laptop was compromised or that the FBI either sought or obtained this data. " Apple said it did not provide any user information to the FBI or other organizations.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 23, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Serving up more features in smaller packages was the major theme at Apple's media event Monday, as the company ushered in a downsized four-inch iPhone SE and a refreshed 9.7 inch iPad Air called the iPad Pro - with both products borrowing tricks from their bigger sisters. Unlike Samsung, which sells a ton of big-screen "phablet" phones, Apple has seen its 6 series iPhone sales be far stronger in the smaller-screened, 4.7-inch 6S model than in the 5.5-inch 6S Plus. Consumer Intelligence Research Partners suggests the smaller iPhone 6S made up 48 percent of all U.S. iPhone sales during Apple's fiscal first quarter this year, while the iPhone 6S Plus accounted for 19 percent.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes a generous 2 cups 1/2 teaspoon nigella seed (also called kalonji or black onion seed) 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed 2 crisp green apples, such as Granny Smith Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon Generous pinch sugar, or as needed Pinch sea salt, or as needed 11/4 cups plain, low-fat Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped mint 1. Lightly toast the nigella, cumin, and fennel...
NEWS
March 2, 2016
ISSUE | SECURITY VS. PRIVACY Apple is right to oppose court order Apple CEO Tim Cook should continue resisting FBI overtures to circumvent the company's encryption software ("CEO defends Apple's stance," Sunday). If the company gave in and wrote a software program to access the content of a single terrorist's iPhone, who could assure us that the master key to unlocking data of Apple iPhones worldwide would not be abused? What if the software got into a terrorist's hands? Would accessing the data of one terrorist, now deceased, be worth giving a terrorist organization the ability to access every iPhone, including those with highly classified information?
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Benjamin Powell
Politicians of both parties are prone to making economically illiterate promises and claims during campaign seasons. Donald Trump is turning this illiteracy into an art form. One of his latest insane promises is to force Apple to manufacture in the United States. In a recent speech at Liberty University, Trump boasted, "We're going to get Apple to build their damn computers in this country instead of other countries. " In these few words, Trump gets trade economics wrong and shows his ignorance of modern manufacturing.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Carol Fragale Brill
Imagine it is leap year, February 1972. My best friend, Tina, and I had just turned 20. To celebrate and make the most of Feb. 29, our bonus leap day, we planned an extra-long weekend in the Big Apple. It meant taking two precious vacation days from our first "real" jobs at the telephone company - this is back in the day, when working at "the telephone company" could only mean Ma Bell. All these years later, the four-day weekend we invested those vacation days for still makes my top-10 list of all-time favorite adventures.
NEWS
February 29, 2016
Contemplating the powerful computers many of us carry around in our pockets these days can be confusing, especially to the law enforcement officials who keep coming to the conclusion that they should have unprecedented access to everything on them. Given the complex technology at hand and the government's efforts to defeat it with a statute dating to the 18th century, perhaps the FBI's standoff with Apple over smartphone security can be clarified by an analogy also set in low-tech early America.
SPORTS
February 29, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
INDIANAPOLIS - Just three years after leaving Eastern Regional High School for Ohio State, Eli Apple is now a potential first-round NFL draft pick. The Voorhees native is one of the top cornerback prospects in the draft. He played only two seasons of college football, but he started both years for the Buckeyes, and his 6-foot-1, 199-pound frame fits the prototype for a press-coverage cornerback in the NFL. "That's something in the NFL that's really important, to be a physical guy at the line of scrimmage and be able to take receivers off their path," Apple said.
NEWS
February 27, 2016
By George A. Nation III Apple's reluctance to cooperate with the government in its investigation of Syed Rizwan Farook, one of the San Bernardino shooters, is motivated by concern for its reputation and ultimately for its sales. Put simply, it's a matter of money. Apple will and should lose this battle with the government. Any business, including Apple, that can provide information relevant to a criminal investigation will and should be compelled by the government to do so. The All Writs Act specifically gives the government this authority.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
By Pat Meehan FBI Director Jim Comey knows terrorism. He served as Manhattan's U.S. attorney and, before that, led the investigation of the Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia. Tim Cook knows technology. As the CEO at Apple, he is responsible for the direction of the world's largest technology company. They are central figures in the standoff over Apple's resistance to facilitating a search of the iPhone used by San Bernardino terrorist Syed Farook. They both present compelling cases.
NEWS
February 24, 2016
ISSUE | PRIVACY AND SECURITY Terrorist's information no longer critical Under extraordinary circumstances in which imminent danger is involved and the lives of people are immediately at stake, Apple should be required to unlock a terrorist's cellphone ("Apple defies judge's order to unlock terrorist's phone," Thursday). But given the unsavory track record of the federal government, which has invaded and abused the privacy of the American public on countless occasions, I would be reluctant to unlock a cellphone at its request.
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