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Apple Cider

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FOOD
November 1, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Whether sweet, hard or packing an inebriating wallop, apple cider is the potion to down by the dram when foliage flares to ocher and red. It is the lacquer that paints a plain roast chicken with a glaze of just-fallen fruit. And it's the jug on the pantry shelf that calls us to luxuriate in another harvest before winter settles in. Cider is made by crushing apples into a pulp, then pressing the pulp to extract its juice. After that, the juice can be bottled and sold immediately as sweet cider.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
On chilly fall nights, there is nothing quite as cozy as a mug of hot cider - except for a mug of hot cider spiked with a shot of Snap. When added at the last moment, this ginger- and molasses-infused liqueur from Philadelphia's Art in the Age, inspired by Pennsylvania Dutch ginger bread, has the effect of an instant mulling spice. I didn't expect to like this so much. I haven't had much luck with Art in the Age's line of boldly flavored organic liqueurs, which, such as Root, are so commandingly distinctive they do not always play nice as congenial mixers in cocktails, where they tend to overpower.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Diane Struzzi, Special to The Inquirer
Making apple cider can be messy business. Chunks of apple skin spit from pressed cheesecloth; juice sprays in all directions. It's a sticky process. "Running the press, you're not supposed to get wet," said Caroline Friede, a Temple University senior horticultural major. "But you do. " Friede should know. During the first run, she was at the side of the presser, getting drenched with apple debris. As students at Temple's Ambler campus were preparing to make their second run on the apple press, Friede made a small request.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
You may never have heard of alcoholic apple cider, let alone tasted it, because not much is sold in Pennsylvania. Cider makers are hoping that will change soon now that the Pennsylvania legislature has approved a bill for Gov. Ridge's signature that would allow the up-and-coming beverage to be sold in beer distributorships around the state. But that victory for cider producers did not come without a loser - E & J Gallo Winery Inc. of Modesto, Calif., which produces Hornsby's, the biggest selling hard apple cider in the country, Gallo said.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I need your help. Is cider a wine or a beer, or just juice? It keeps showing up on tap at the pub, and my pals and I are stumped. Marnie: Cider terminology is a little confusing, Buzz. Almost everywhere else in the world, a cider is a fermented alcoholic drink made from apples or pears. However, in the U.S., "apple cider" is simply apple juice that has not been filtered or pasteurized. That's the cloudy juice you see at the grocery store.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
It's autumn once again. For many people, autumn means many different things. But there are a few mainstays of autumn that are embedded in nearly all New Jerseyans - football, raking leaves, wool sweaters and, of course, apples. Apples, apple cider, apple pie, all just a few of the harbingers of autumn. And for the 10th year in a row, the Medford Historical Society will celebrate the advent of the apple season with its annual Apple Festival, which will be held Saturday.
FOOD
October 31, 1999 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Supermarket aisles are filled with endless bottled salad dressings of every variety imaginable, many containing long lists of mysterious ingredients and preservatives that I'd rather not eat. The produce section has another whole selection of fresh-made dressings of higher quality, and also higher price. To keep commercially prepared dressings emulsified (meaning creamy and evenly combined), they are often thickened with vegetable gums such as xanthan (a corn syrup product) or carrageen (also called Irish moss and derived from a special type of seaweed)
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Karen Vollmecke and her family have been harvesting apples on their farm in West Brandywine Township for as long as she can remember. Their 400 trees produce 13 different varieties of the fruit that symbolizes autumn. Karen will be bringing the pride of the Vollmecke farm to the 16th Annual Harvest Market at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford. The festival runs every weekend from now until Oct. 30. "We sell our apples by the half bushel, bushel, and peck," said Vollmecke, a horticulturist.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
The Barns-Brinton House and the Chaddsford Winery have collaborated to make the apple the toast of a weekend festival. At the 18th-century Barns-Brinton House, visitors can learn the ABCs of apple butter cookery, said Susan Hauser, spokeswoman for the Chadds Ford Historical Society. The society maintains the house, which was once a tavern, and the John Chads House. Hauser said visitors would get to see apple butter being made. "Hopefully, if the weather is good, we will be making the apple butter outdoors," Hauser said.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Sure, there may be nothing like Paris in the springtime or moonlight in Vermont. But for year-round delight, Susan Robinson prefers Aisle 4 at the University City Thriftway. There, nose pressed against the frozen-food case, the 21-year-old baby- sitter ogles such goodies as the Haagen-Dazs Chocolate Chocolate Chip ice cream, the Celeste Frozen Pizza, and the Farm Rich Frozen Mozzarella Sticks. Across the aisle other treats await, like the Cocoa Puffs cereal and the Lucky Charms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Makes 13/4 quarts 2 quarts apple cores and peels 2 quarts water 1/3 cup sugar 1. Put the apple cores and peels in a large glass or ceramic bowl. Dissolve the sugar in the water and pour over the cores and peels. Cover with a plate and weight down with something heavy to keep the solids submerged. Cover the entire bowl with cheesecloth or a kitchen towel and leave on the counter out of direct sunlight for 7 days. 2. Strain the cores and peels from the liquid and discard the solids.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
On chilly fall nights, there is nothing quite as cozy as a mug of hot cider - except for a mug of hot cider spiked with a shot of Snap. When added at the last moment, this ginger- and molasses-infused liqueur from Philadelphia's Art in the Age, inspired by Pennsylvania Dutch ginger bread, has the effect of an instant mulling spice. I didn't expect to like this so much. I haven't had much luck with Art in the Age's line of boldly flavored organic liqueurs, which, such as Root, are so commandingly distinctive they do not always play nice as congenial mixers in cocktails, where they tend to overpower.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I need your help. Is cider a wine or a beer, or just juice? It keeps showing up on tap at the pub, and my pals and I are stumped. Marnie: Cider terminology is a little confusing, Buzz. Almost everywhere else in the world, a cider is a fermented alcoholic drink made from apples or pears. However, in the U.S., "apple cider" is simply apple juice that has not been filtered or pasteurized. That's the cloudy juice you see at the grocery store.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011
Special Events Boat to Bartram's Garden River Tour Boat trip down the Schuylkill river to Bartram's Garden. Tour the botanic gardens & Bartram House. 215-222-6030 x100. Schuylkill Banks, Market St.; Reservations required: 215-222-6030 x100. $30; $20 children 12 and under. Closes 10/16. Hella Fresh Fish 3.0 Ten Minute Play Festival B. Someday Productions & Hella Fresh team together to bring 12 new 10-minute plays. Closes 10/23. Walking Fish Theatre, 2509 Frankford Ave.; 215-427-9255 (WALK)
NEWS
September 25, 2011
It's apple season now - both in the local orchards my family loves to frequent, and also in my glass. So the timing couldn't be better for Crispin, a bright new hard cider from Colfax, Calif., that debuted this month in local bars and bottle shops. Unlike many big-label competitors, Crispin is made from 100 percent pressed juice apples, with no added sugar or concentrate. And it's noticeably lighter in color. That doesn't mean weak flavor, though. This cider may have a lightness of weight, but it delivers a vivid apple sweetness on the nose, and a long dry finish of real fruit and skin-peel tannins, lingering even above the recommended glass of ice. Even more intriguing, though, is Crispin's potential as a cocktail mixer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk
Saturday Old-fashioned cider Howell Farm invites visitors to use old-fashioned cider presses, peeler-corers, and "stomper-strainers" to process apples. Learn this century-old way to make apple cider, applesauce, and apple pie between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday. Enjoy a demonstration by third-generation New Jersey apple grower Coles Roberts of Vincentown. A children's walk-in craft program, "Apple Pomander," will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a $3 fee for each craft.
SPORTS
September 28, 2010
WASHINGTON - The last out was made, the championship was won, the customary display of jubilation began. Of course, since Mike Sweeney was only 17 years old back then, some allowances had to be made. So the youngsters partied like it was 1991 after Ontario High School completed a 26-0 season and captured the California Interscholastic Federation 3-A title. "We were able to celebrate with apple cider. There's no sting in apple cider," Sweeney, now 37 and completing his 20th professional season, noted the other day. "So I want to see what it's going to feel like with champagne.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
Peddler's Village in Lahaska invites families to celebrate the crisp feeling of a fall weekend full of delicious apple specialties at the 36th Annual Apple Festival. Visitors can dig into their favorite apple dishes from crisp apple fritters and warm apple pie to savory apple dumplings and freshly pressed apple cider from restaurant and merchant booths. For those who'd rather take baking matters into their own hands, green, golden and red delicious apples will be available from local orchards.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until two years ago, every peach that Santo Maccherone couldn't send to market cut into his profit margin. There was nothing wrong with the peaches - in fact, they were probably the best-tasting ones because they were perfectly ripe. But that also meant they couldn't be shipped without suffering bruises or turning overripe. "I was throwing out at least 10 percent, sometimes more, of the crop each year," said Maccherone, a third-generation farmer who owns Circle M Fruit Farms in Mullica Hill.
FOOD
November 13, 2003 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
Some time-squeezed cooks prepare one showstopping dish when they entertain and rely on take-out for the rest of the menu. Not Rachael Ray. For this Food Network star and cookbook author, singling out one recipe would be like asking a parent to select a favorite child. "I'm an impatient girl, and that carries over to entertaining," says Ray, whose new book, 30-Minute Meals: Get Togethers (Lake Isle Press, $18.95), has just been released. "But I don't know if I could contain myself to one dish.
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